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Preface 





N TENDERING this volume, The X-Ray of 
1914, to the Students and Faculty of the Medi- 
cal College of Virginia and the public in gen- 
eral, we are aware of its faults and short- 
comings, but for its contents we have no apolo- 
gies to make. AV'e have tried to make it an 
annual of the whole student body. To those who 
are inclined to destructively criticize, we would 
ask them to reflect on the aid they have given to make it a 
success. To those who have received "brickbats" where they 
expected "bouquets," we would ask that they take it in the 
spirit in which it was meant. We trust that at some future 
time when, after the years, our student days of the past will 
begin to grow dim, this volume will be deemed worthy a place 
on some A^ledico's table ; there to recall the friendships, asso- . 
ciations, sorrows and joys of our student days of the long ago. 

The Editors. 



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College History 




HE MEDICAL COLLEGE OE VIRGINIA, as it now stands, 
is the result of the amalgamation of the two medical schools 
existing in Richmond prior to 1913. These were the Medical 
College of Virginia and the University College of Medicine. 
The history of the present college necessarily includes those 
of its two parts, and in brief we present them here. 

The Medical College of Virginia was established in 1837, 
under a most liberal State charter. Its first quarters was 
the Union Hotel, at Nineteenth and Main Streets. In 1845 the building 
on Marshall and College Streets was completed ; this building standing 
today as one of the most beautiful examples of Egyptian architecture in 
the country. 

When the war between the States came on, this was the only medical 
college within the borders of the Confederacy which kept open its lecture 
halls. Two sessions of six months each were conducted to furnish the men 
who, with practically no drugs except those captured from the enemy, and 
with even less hospital equipment, were to minister to the wounds and ill- 
nesses of the ragged boys in grey, and to the hordes of their prisoners. 
After the war, the college fought with the rest of the South through the 
horrors of readjustment, and by the faithfulness of Faculty and Alumni 
kept up its march of progress. 

The University College of Medicine was founded in 1892. Under the 
policy of the college for more liberal and extensive medical education, the 
school grew rapidly. It had no State appropriation, and the funds necessary 
for its maintenance were largely met by the liberality of the Faculty. In 
January, 1910, the building was burned to the ground, together with its equip- 
ment, museum, and several invaluable personal collections of members of 
its Faculty. 

But fire could not burn the enthusiasm of its supporters, and lectures 
were immediately continued in nearby halls, and in the laboratories of the 
Medical College of Virginia, which were most kindly offered. Plans for 
rebuilding were soon made, and owing to the tireless work of the President, 
the Faculty and Board of Directors, a building was started on the site of 



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the old. As a restilt, one of the best buildings for medical training i; 
South now stands there. 

In the spring of 1913, with practically no warning, it was announced 
that articles of amalgamation had been signed by the boards of the two col- 
leges. Neither one was to lose its identity, but both were to give of their 
best to the formation of the new. Both Faculties resigned, and from them 
a new one was chosen, while on the Board of Directors equal representation 
was secured. And so begins a new chapter in our history. The first year 
is over now, the rough edges worn smooth, differences buried, and the future 
very bright. In truth it seems that the past histories of the two institutions 
speak well for that yet to be written. The spirit, enthusiasm, loyalty and 
efforts which have achieved so much in the past must now achieve vastly 
greater things in their coordination. 




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X-Ray Staff 

R. E. Glass Editor in Chief 

G. W. ScHENCK Business Manager 

G. W. RoLSTON Assistant Editor in Chief 

C. B. Harloe ) ^ ., -cju^,.^ 

- Literary Editors 

J. H. ROYSTER ) 

J. C. Braswell j Assistant Business Managers 

B. F. Brugh ) 

L. B. StATON ) ^^.^ £^,;^^,^ 

T. M. FiTTs i 

P\ B. HuTTON Fraternity Editor 

J. C. Walker Athletic Editor 

D. F. Keel '. Club Editor 

F. Flinn ) T , , r- ■ ^ 

'- Jokes and Grinds 
1. K. Redd \ 




Cf)e Idlap, 1914 






'A 



Board of Publication 

Dr. S. C. Mitchell Chairman 

M, P. DlLLARD . . ) 

. „ „ [ Seniors 

A. L. SiNTON ) 

G. W. ScHENCK Junior 

F. M. FiTTs Soph-more 

W. S. Granger : Freshman 

W. M. Chandler Dental 

E. M. Hardin Pharmacv 




Samuel Childs Mitchell, Ph. D., LL. D. 

President Mitchell comes to us from the University of South Carolina. 
\Ye have 'known him but a short time, but in that time he has endeared himself 
to all of us by his frank and congenial manners. Dr. Mitchel during this 
time has labored unceasingly and unselfishly for the upbuilding of the Greater 
Medical College of Virginia. 






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C. A. BLANTON, M. D., 
Emeritus Professor of Diseases of Children. 

J. F. BRIGHT, M. D-, 
Emeritus Professor of Anatomy. 

HENRY H. LEVY, M. D, 
Emeritus Professor of Practice of Medicine- 

J. W. LONG, M. D, 
Emeritus Professor of Diseases of Women and Children. 

GEORGE ROSS, M. D, 
Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics. 

WILLIAM H. TAYLOR, M. D., 
Emeritus Professor of Chemistry. 

CHRISTOPHER TOMPKINS, M. D., 
Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics. 

LEWIS C. BOSHER, M. D., 
Professor of Genito Urinary Surgery. 

MANFRED CALL, M. D., 
Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

W. G. CHRISTIAN, M. D., 
Professor of Anatomy. 

JOHN DUNN, A. M, M. D-, 
Professor of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology. 

WILLIAM S. GORDON, M. D., 
Professor of Medicine- 

ALFRED L. GRAY, M. D., 
Professor of Physiology. 

J. ALLISON HODGES, M. D., 
Professor of Clinical Neurology and Psychiatry. 

GEORGE BEN JOHNSTON, M. D., 
Professor of Surgery. 

E. P. McGAVOCK, M. D., 
Professor of Dermatology and Syf'hillis. 




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CDe I^iaap, 1914 




Professors — Continued 

EDWARD McGUIRE, M. D, 
Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

STEWART McGUIRE, M. D., 
Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

S. B. MOON, M. D.. 
Professor of Pathology. 

McGUIRE NEWTON, M. D., 
Professor of Pediatrics. 

CHARLES R, ROBINS, M. D., 
Professor of Gynecology. 

W^ORTLEY F. RUDD, A. M., Ph. B., 

Professor of Chemistry. 

W. A. SHEPHERD, M- D., 
Professor of Histology and Embryology, and Associate in Pathology. 

HUGH M. TAYLOR, M. D., 
Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

BEVERLY R. TUCKER, M. D., 
Professor of Neurology and Psychiatry. 

FRANCIS W. UPSHUR, M. D., 
Professor of Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 

JOSEPH A. WHITE, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Opthalmology. 

JOHN F. WINN, M. D, 
Professor of Obstetrics. 






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Associate Professors 



GREER BAUGHMAN, M- D., 
Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

SAMUEL C. BOWEN, M. D., 
Associate Professor of Laryngology. 

JOHN W. BROADNAX, M. D-, 
Associate Professor of Anatomy. 

A. G. BROWN, JR., M. D-, 
Associate Professor of Medicine. 

ROBERT C. BRYAN, M. D-, 
Associate Professor of Genito Urinary Surgery. 

WILLIAM W. DUNN, M. D., 
Associate Professor of Surgery. 

ST. GEORGE T. GRINNAN, M. D., 
Associate Professor of Pediatrics. 

JAMES W. HENSON, M. D., 
Associate Professor of Surgery. 

E. GUY HOPKINS, M. D-, 
Associate Professor of Pathology. 

G. PAUL LA ROQUE. M. D., 
Associate Professor of Surgery. 

C HOWARD LEWIS, M. D., 
Associate Professor of Physiology. 

WILLIAM P. MATHEWS, M. D., 
Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

STEWART N. MICHAUX, M. D-, 
Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

CLIFTON N. MILLER, M. D., 
Associate Professr of Otology and Rhinology. 

E. C. L. MILLER, M. D., 

Associate Professor of Ciieuiistry and Associate in Bacteriology. 

ROSHIER W. MILLER, M. D. Ph. G., 
Associate Professor of Neurology and Psychiatry. 

J. GARNET NELSON, A. M., M. D., 
Associate Professor of Medicine. 



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J. LOWNDES PEPLE, 
Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

A. H. STRAUS, B. S., 
Associate Professor of Bacteriology- 

J. McCAW TOMPKINS, M. D, 

Associate Professor of Medicine. 

DOUGLAS VANDERHOOF, AM., M. D., 
Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

LESLIE B. WIGGS, M. D, 
Associate Professor of Materia Mcdica and Pharmacology and Associate in Physiology. 

ENNION G. WILLIAMS, M. D., 
Associate Professor of Hygiene and Public Health. 

A. MURAT WILLIS, M. D, 
Associate Professor of Surgery. 




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Ci)e I^map, 1914 



23 



Associates — Continued 

B. L. HILLSMAN, M. D., 
^ Associate in Surgery. 

M. D. HOGE, M. D, 
Associate in Medicine. 

J. MORRISON HUTCHESON, M. D., 
Associate in Medicine. 

W. RUSSELL JONES, M. D., 
Associate in Medicine. 

H. G. LATIMER, M. D-, 

Associate in Materia Medica. 

HERBERT MANN, M. D., 
Associate in Surgery. 

G. B. MARTIN, M. D., 
Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

R. F. McCRACKEN, A. M., 
Associate in Chemistry. 

W. F. MERCER, M. D., 

Associate in Otology. Rhinology and Laryngology- 

T. W. MURRELL, M. D. 
Associate in Dermatology and Syphillis. 

M. E. NUCKOLS, M- D., 
Associate in Surgery. 

B. W. RAWLES, M. D, 

Associate in Surgery. 

B. M. ROSEBOROUGH, 
Associate in Pediatrics. 

JAMES H. SMITH, M. D., 

Associate in Medicine. 

D. D. TALLEY, M. D, 
Associate in Surgery. 

J. M. WHITFIELD, M. D., 

Associate in Medical Jurisprudence, Ethics and Economics. 

B. C WILLIS, M. D,, 
Associate in Surgery. 




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Cl)e I'Uap, 1914 




Instructors 

M. L. ANDERSON, M. D, 
Instructor in Obstetrics. 

S. J. BAKER, M. D., 
Instructor in Obstetrics. 

. JOSEPH BEAR, M. D., 
Instructor in Obstetrics. 

CARL S. BLACKWELL, M. D., 
Instructor in OpthaJmology. 

J. R. BLAIR, M. D., 
Instructor in Clinical Gynecology. 

T. N. BROADDUS, M- D, 

Instructor in Histology and Embryology. 

Instructor in Clinical Gynecology. 

O. C. BRUNK, M. D., 
Instructor in Medicine. 

H. A. BULLOCK, M. D., 
Instructor in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

GILES B. COOK, M. D., 

Instructor in Medicine 

E. A. DRUM, M. D, 
Instructor in Obstetrics. 

J. M. EARNHARD'T, M. D., 
Instructor in Pathology. 

N. THOMAS ENNETT, M. D, 
Instructor in Pediatrics. 

J. O. FITZGERALD, M. D, 

Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health, 

Instructor in Pathology. 

R. S. FITZGERALD, M. D., 
Instructor in Obstetrics. 

J. F. GEISINGER, M. D., 

Instructor in Gynecology. 

WILLIAM T. GRAHAM, M. D., 
Instructor in Anatomy. 
Instructor in Surgery, 

Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 





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Cfte J'Bap, 1814 



25 



Instructors — Continued 

B. H. GRAY. M. D., 
Instructor in Obstetrics- 

M. GROVE-HAGAN, M. D., 
Instructor in Clinical Medicine. 

C. C. HASKELL, M. D., 
Instructor in Pliysiology and Pharmacology. 

A. L. HERRING, M. D., 
Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

W. H. HIGGINS, M. D-, 
Instructor in Clinical Medicine. 

G. F. HIGHSMITH, M. D., 
Instructor in Clinical Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

FRED HODGES. M. D., 

Instructor in Medicine. 

Instructor in Clinical Medicine- 

W. B. HOPKINS. M. D., 
Instructor in Otology. Rhinology and Laryngology. 

P. W. HOWLE. M. D., 

Instructor in Clinical Surgery. 

Instructor in Clinical Gynecology. 

F. S. JOHNS, M. D 

Instructor in Materia Medico- 

P. D. LIPSCOMB, M. D., 
Instructor in Histology and Embryology. 

F. K. LORD, M. D., 
Instructor in Clinical Medicine. 

A. A. MARSTELLER, M. D., 
Instructor in Neurology and Psychiatry. 

C. W. MERCER, M. D.. 
Instructor in Clinical Ortho[<cdic Surgery. 





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Cfie $*iaap, 1914 



Instructors — Continued 

H. B. SANFORD, M. D., 
Instructor in Obstetrics. 

F. G. SIMMONS, M. D., 
Instructor in Pediatrics. 

JAMES H SMITH, M. D, 
Instructor in Therapeutics. 

M. C. SYCLE, M. D.. 
Instructor in Clinical Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

E. H. TERRELL, M. D., 
Instructor in Surgery- 

A. E. TURMAN, M. D., 
Instructor in Obstetrics and Therapeutics. 

W. F. WILLIAMSON, M. D, 
Instructor in Anatomy. 



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CDe 3e*map, 1914 



27 



Assistants 

C. C. COLEMAN, M. D., 
Assistant in Surgery. 

ROBERT L. EDWARDS, M. D., 
Assistant in Opthainiology. 

G. A. EZEKIEL, M. D., 

Assistant in Medicine. 

R. C. FRAVEL, M. D., 

Assistant in Surgery. 

H. NORTON MASON, M- D., 
Assistant in Surgery. 

F. D. MERRICK, M. D., 
Assistant in Otology, Rhinology, and Larynology. 

R. S. PRESTON, M. D, 

Assistant in Pediatrics. 

F. R. RUPP, M. D, 
Assistant in Neurology, and Psychiatry. 

E. S. TALBOT, M. D, 
Assistaitt in Orthopedic Surgery. 

A. L. WINFIELD, M. D., 
Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 



Denistry 



C. C. COLEMAN, M- D, 
Professor of Oral Surgery and Anaesthesia. 

W. J. COWARDIN, M. D., D- D. S, 

Professor of Prostlietic Dentistry and Instructor in Operative Dentistrv. 

J. A. CAMERON HOGGAN, D. D. S., 

Professor of Orthodontia. 

J. MORTIMER HUGHES, D. D. S., 

Professor of Crown and Bridge Work. 

Instructor in Prosthetic and Croivn and Bridge Work Technic. 

R. H. JEFFRIES, D. D. S., 
Associate Professor of Dental Materia Medica and Instructor in Prosthetic Technic. 




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Ci)e %'Mav, 19X4 



Dentistry — Continued 





T. M. SCALES, D. D. S., 
Professor of Dental Pathology and Therapeutics, and Instructor in Operative and 

Porcelain Technic. 

RICHARD L. SIMPSON, A. M, D. D. S., 

Professor of Clinical Dentistry. 

P. B. WALTON, D. D. S.. 
Professor of Metallurgy, Jurisprudence, Ethics and Economics. 

HARRY BEAR, D. D. S., 
Instructor in Metallurgy. 

G. R. HARRISON, D. D. S., 
Associate in Oral Surgery and Instructor in Anaesthesia. 

FRANK R. KELLY, D- D. S., 
Instructor in Dental Materia Medica and Operative and Prosthetic Dentistry. 

H. L. HEARS, D. D. S., 
Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry. 

W. W. SPRATLEY, D. D. S, 
Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 



Pharmacy 



A. BOLENBAUGH, B. S. in Pharmacy, Chairman, 
Professor of Pharmacy. 

WORTLEY F. RUDD, M. A., Ph. B, 
Professor of Chemistry. 

H. G. LATIMER, Ph. G., M. D., 

Professor of Materia Medica and To.vicclogy. 

(To be elected.) 
Professor of Botany and Pharmacognosy. 

A. H. STRAUS, B. S., 
Professor of Bacteriology and Hygiene- 

E. C. L. MILLER, M. D., 
Professor of Physiology and First Aid. 

Associates 

E. W. MAGRUDER, Ph. D., 
Associate in Chemistry. 

LACY T. FORD, Ph. G., 

Associate in Pliarmacy. 







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Cbe J^iaap, 1914 



29 



Board of Visitors 

J. N. Barney, M. D Fredericksburg 

E. L. Bemiss • Richmond 

H. L. Cabell • • Richmond 

C. P. Cardwell Richmond 

George L- Christian Richmond 

J. B. Fisher, M. D Midlothian 

W. L. Harris, M. D Norfolk 

John S. Harwood Richmond 

Eppa Hunton, Jr ■ • • Richmond 

Paulus a. Irving, M. D Farmville 

John M. Johnson Alexandria 

J. D. Johnson Roanoke 

W. R. Miller • • Richmond 

Thomas L. Moore Richmond 

L. Z. Morris • ■ • • • Richmond 

H. S. Myers, M. D - Forks of Buiifalo 

Robert C. Randolph, M. D Boyce 

E. D. Taylor Richmond 



Executive Committee of the Board 



L. Z. Morris, Chairman; 
E. L. Bemiss, 
C- P. Cardwell, 



Eppa Hunton, 
W. R. Miller, 
Thos. L. Moore. 



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Dr. I.e. Beo.hr 

X-Ray 
Specialist 



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C!}e I*Hap, 1914 




ROBERT COFER BARRETT, 
Q T $ 

Virginia. 

"Cofer" was securely launched on the 
wings of the Freshman class four years 
ago. Since then, he has steadily, surely and 
serenely floated in a semi-comatose condi- 
tion (but he can be aroused) towards the 
longed-for degree. 

Thoroughly domesticated as he is, we 
can recommend him highly to the fair 
sex as one who can be easily tamed when 
caught. He is particularly interested in 
experimental work, and his future patients 
may rest assured that any medicine he 
ma)^ deign to prescribe has been thoroughly 
demonstrated to his own satisfaction by 
first using it on himself. 

Cofer expects to enjoy a large practice, 
and in anticipation is already negotiating 
for assistance. He believes in Suffrage. 






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F. MACK BENNETT, 
North Carolina. 

"Mac" hails from Clinton, N. C. and it 
is reported that the reason he is tall and 
thin is because he stretched himself reach- 
ing for the high "berries" during adoles- 
cence. "Mac" suffers some from paranoia 
and is a member in good standing of the 
"Dill Pickers" club, having passed the 
thirty-third degree. 

Calico appeals to him strongly and he 
doesn't believe in single blessedness so a 
matrimonial alliance seems to be his ulti- 
mate fate. When you fully know "Mac" 
he is warm hearted and generous and has 
made a good record in college. 




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JAMES GORDON BOISSEAU, 
Q T $ 

Virginia. 

"With modesty and persistence he pushes 
on to the goal of his ambition." 

Gordon entered the University College of 
Medicine 1910; the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia 1913. A hard worker but not a book 
worm, always successful in his examina- 
tions and yet ever ready for diversion from 
studies. He is a believer in "Mens saiia in 
corpore sano," a loyal friend, a jovial com- 
panion, and, with an affable disposition, he 
bids well to succeed in his chosen pro- 
fession. 



RAY C. BLANKENSHIP, Q T $ 

Virginia. 

"Blankie" arrived here four years ago, 
with firm intentions of enlightening his 
professors, but on account of having to 
move so often, his determinations have 
waned. He has sampled every species of 
"hash" dished out from the local boarding 
houses. 

He is a very versatile young man, having 
been at one time nurse girl to certain 
Bovine live stock at V. P. I. and at other 
times amusing himself by biting holes in 
Swiss cheese. 

Sometimes he sings (?) 

Seriously, Ray is an excellent student and 
a very lovable fellow, and we wish him the 
success he deserves in his chosen profession. 






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C!)e X'Wiav, 1914 




GEORGE EDWARD BOWDOIN, 
X Z X 

North Carolina. 

This big, brawny, overgrown specimen of 
the old North state comes to us from 
Wilmington, N. C. and, in the words of 
the history, he is a "fairly" well nourished 
individual. 

"Bo" is possessed of a voice like a fog- 
horn and in answering to roll call sounds 
like the explosion of a cannon cracker. He 
is a wrestler of some merit, and tackles 
all comers using the cement floor of the 
amphitheatre as a mat. There is no ques- 
tion about Bo's physical ability to practice 
medicine. In the "Frat" house, "Bo" is not 
much on washwomen and gives his patron- 
age to the "Chinks." 





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EARLE LEDBETTER BOWMAN, 
K W 

North Carolina. 

This promising young six footer comes 
to us from Liberty, N. C. Liberty Normal 
College attended to his early education and 
there he learned his motto — ^"Do as you 
like, where you like and when you like." 
Earle is an optimist and looks innocent 
despite his many love affairs. He is a 
great defender of his native heath, as all 
good "tarheels" should be, and attained 
great fame "down home" by doing some 
skillful operations on live stock. 

He is energetic and studious and his 
"long suit" is diagnosis. 

When he arrives late for class he always 
assures the professor that "Dr. Bowman" 
is "on the job." 




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Ci)e %'Mav, iei4 



35 




GEORGE BENTLEY BYRD, 

K s, n M 

Virginia. 

Bentley hails from Kellar, Va., and is not 
a little proud of the Eastern Shore. Before 
coming to us, he went to William and Mary 
for three years; his life before this having 
been devoted to racing horses and raising 
sweet potatoes on the Eastern Shore. He 
is a member of the R. L. I. B., company B., 
and watches the Mexican situation with in- 
terest not to say anxiety Next year he ex- 
pects to take hospital work in Norfolk, Va. 
He is not married — yet. 



CLARENCE MONROE BYNUM, 
K W 

North Carolina. 

"Germ" or "Shrimp" comes to us from 
Goldston, N. C. where he secured his early 
education in the Goldston High School. 

Habits and Characteristics — Studying, 
cussing, loving, smoking, buying caps, wear- 
ing extreme peg legged trousers and suits 
of coppery hue and walking with hands in 
his pockets. 

Chief Drj/rM— Chocolates and their end 
products. To possess dog, gun and place 
to hunt. 

Synopsis — The man who went through 
school without talking. 

Future — Husband, father. Ford, and 
specialist on clildren. 




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Cbe I^lRap, 1914 




MASON BLAKE CALD\\'ELL, 
K T 

West \'irginia. 

Some long time ago before the days of 
obstetrical "Johnnie" and the parcel post, 
the good old stork deposited on a farm in 
Mercer county, West Virginia, little Mason 
Blake, surnamed Caldwell. 

After being used as a farm implement for 
many years he grew weary and started to 
cultivate the minds of the West Virginia 
mountaineers. He would have continued as 
a pedagogue had not he become infected 
with the bacillus "amores" and united his 
life with that of Miss Elsie White in 1910. 

Recently it has been noticed that Mason 
is somewhat pale and "sleepified" and, after 
investigation, it was found that since 1913 
he has been continually suffering from In- 
somnia Neonatorum. 



VIRGIL HOPE CARSON, $ P S 

Virginia. 

"Skinny" specializes on the brain, es- 
pecially his own. A pair of glasses, a 
unique and indeed pathognomonic smile, 
six feet in the air, with tan shoes at the 
bottom — the diagonosis is complete. He is 
of a sweet, gentle, winning disposition, pop- 
ular with women and men. After a year 
at Gouveneur Hospital, New York, he \yill 
be engaged in building up what we believe 
will be a large and lucrative practice in his 
home in Henrico county. 




CI)e I*map, 1914 



37 



'iiEE 




EDWARDO GABRIEL CATA, A. B. 
K W 

Cuba. 

"Whop" hails from the sunny Isle of 
Cuba. He was born during an insurrection 
(which probably accounts for his pugilistic 
nature) and raised on bull fights and mo- 
lasses. He drifted to us (after getting his 
A. B. at University of Missouri) during 
our Freshman year and admitted to the 
class of 1914, after being curiously gazed 
at and considered harmless, by students and 
professors. Now we know him well — a 
fair sample of innocence and fury and 
genius and amiability combined. His pe- 
culiar characteristics are : To sleep little, 
except during lectures, talk a language that 
no one understands, smile often, and "cuss" 
his professors in Spanish when they don't 
agree with him. We see him in the future 
gathering his sheckels in the flowery land 
of his fathers with a dark haired senorita 
as life companion. 



HARRY GILMORE CARTER, A. B 

e A X, $ X 

Virginia. 
President Degree Men's Club. 

"Duke" is a product of the farm. Having 
passed successfully his bare foot days and 
the "stone bruises" and the "ground itch," 
he went to college and secured his diploma. 
He next taught school for two years and 
gained a reputation as a "model young 
man" ; a title which he has nearly lived 
down since entering M. C. V. in 1910. He 
is very fond of dancing the latest "con- 
tortions," but does not approve of the West 
Point rules for dancing. "Duke" evidently 
started to use Herpicide too late, for he 
sufifereth with Alopecia. He has made an 
excellent record in college as well as taking 
an active part in college affairs. "Duke" 
expects to give up single blessedness soon. 






JJ-iJx ujLLmxLUJ.i,UMll!iMllllllUJ±UJi,UjilJJJlUiJLiimj^ 



Ci)e I=Hap, 1914 




HARLOW RICHARD DWIGHT 
CONNELL, X Z X 

Canada 

If you can't say it, sneeze it. He comes 
to us from Ontario, Canada, and is some- 
times called "Frenchy" or "Canuck." He 
brings with him a good deal of the breezi- 
ness of that far northern clime, and has 
made many friends, a goodly number being 
among the fair sex. In his varied experi- 
ences, "Frenchy" has, at different times, 
been a deckhand, stoker and truck wheeler, 
but says he has only spent one night in 
jail. His last venture was in the ranks 
of the Medicos and we feel that the "land 
of the maple" will have no occasion to be 
ashamed of her son. 



EDWARD M. CORNS, K W 

Virginia. 

This dark-haired specimen comes to us 
from Gate City, Va. In his infancy he 
was considered (by his parents) to be the 
handsomest in Southwest Virginia. He 
comes to us as a specimen of old Hickory 
on the map of Ireland, with the ambition 
to reach the zenith of the medical pro- 
fession. He is not a chiropodist, as his 
name might suggest, but being possessed 
of a full-sized surgical tool chest at his 
room, he is prepared to do any operation 
whether "gran mal" or "petit mal." He 
has a reputation as a manufacturer of nitro- 
glycerin ; but it usually explodes before he 
gets it on the market. A great believer in 
pituitrin and a "jokester" of merit. Good 
luck to you, Ed. 




m 



-.-^-^ 



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Cfte I^map, 1914 



39 = 




WILEY SIMON COZAKT, $ B H 

North Carolina 

He arrived on a large tobacco plantation 
near Stem, N. C, twenty-three years ago. 
Having appropriated as many chemical 
names as possible for his own, he launched 
forth in life. The horn worms, tobacco 
barns and cross roads meetings entertained 
him till he dropped into Richmond four 
years ago. As a student he has been a 
ticket maker, both "calico" and medical. He 
wears a serious face that often smiles, and 
walks fast for a "tar heel." -He distin- 
guished M. C. V. as a Junior practitioner 
of medicine in West Virginia last summer, 
and speaks daily of his calls and cures. 
He aspires to a surgeon-generalship in the 
U. S. A., and will tackle this ambition with 
his characteristic enthusiasm and ability. 




^^ 




RICHARD HUNTER CROSS, 
A K K 

Virginia 

"Fats" comes to us from Randolph- 
Macon, and was well known as a debater, 
and earned his title "Cutie." He is re- 
served in manner, and is one of those 
"quiet, still waters" whose depth you can 
never sound; but of whose powers you are 
confident. He first attracted attention by 
appearing in the dissecting hall all "dolled 
out" in rubber gloves. His course in col- 
lege has been a "howling" success and he 
now holds the reputation of best diagnos- 
tician in class. He is always in love, and 
ever and anon it's a different "calico." 

Dick distinguished himself during his sec- 
ond year by curing a case of spinal menin- 
gitis with a dose of urotropin. 

His chief complaint is an acute mania 
for green hats and tan shoes, which is 
gradually passing into a chronic variety. 





40 



Cfte X'Mav, 1914 




HYMAN DANISH, 

("Up to Date") 

New Jersey 

Funny how some will migrate all the 
way from sand dunes and smoke to our 
fair city. This little one's mind was beaten 
into shape at Bayonne (N. J.) High School, 
and then sent to Bellvue Medical tO; be im- 
proved upon. His parents, realizing some- 
thing was lacking, sent him to us for the 
final touches. These have been applied and 
we now can stamp him "Guaranteed to 
wear well," and send him Jersey-ward. A 
regular bookworm and hustler(?) "on the 
side." 



HEATH ASHBY DALTON, K W 

(President Married Men's Club) 
Virginia 

"Heath," tired of growing buckwheat on 
the rough hillsides of Carroll, leaves the 
Allan clan for V. P. I. to begin the life 
of a mechanic. 

Finding the shops too warm for a red- 
headed youngster, he again changed his 
plans, and this time wandered into the 
Medical College. Here he rested very con- 
tent until the beginning of the Senior year, 
when, desirous to accomplish still higher 
things, he robs Dr. Nelson (of the Woman's 
College) of a prospective, and most prom- 
ising, student on September 27, 1913, and 
since then has taken active part in the 
organization and upbuilding of the Mar- 
ried Men's Club of M. C. V. 

When this young gentleman carries his 
M. D. back into the hills, he intends to 
sell his moonshine still and settle down. 





CI)e xmav, 1914 



41 




WHITFIELD POINTER DAVIS, 

Virginia 

Davis comes to us from Galox, Va., and 
was a graduate of Woodlawn High School 
in igog. He is noted for his quietness and 
good disposition and keeps very much to 
himself. A great magazine reader, but a 
good student, and expects to go back, after 
graduation, to the grand old Southwest 
Virginia, and take up his father's practice. 




ELMORE SLEET DEANE, 

Masonic Club. 
Virginia 

Whether you measure him antero pos- 
terior, laterally or perpendicularly, there is 
no astigmatism about him, for he is the 
same in all meridians, and he tips the beam 
somewhere between two and three hundred. 
It is reported he has been elected presi- 
■ dent of the Dill Pickers' Club. "Dillberry" 
doesn't believe much in the efificiency of 
Cascara Sugrada, for he always follows 
it with two C. C. pills. 

Big of body and big of heart, he is a 
conspicuous figure in bedside clinics, and 
when he goes back to Charlottesville, Va., 
the town of his nativity, he will reflect 
credit on the class of 1914. 




42 



Cl)e I*lRap, 1914 





GUY BLAIR DENIT, $ X 

Virginia. 

"Mutt" came to us from V. P. I., where 
he obtained his preliminary education. 
While we find him a little below the average 
in years and stature, it is our pleasure to 
acknowledge that he ranks second to none 
as a student. It is rumored among his class- 
mates that his ambition is directed toward 
the most difficult specialty in medicine and, 
knowing his ability as we do, we expect 
in future years to see his name among 
those of the great men of the age. 




MALCOLM PEEL DILLARD, 

Virginia 

President Junior Class (M. C. V.) ; Board 
of Publication, 1914. 

"Mac" hails from Center Cross, Va.,' and 
in 1905 went to William and Mary College 
to show the faculty what a good student he 
was. He "blew" into Richmond in 1910 
and entered on his career of medicine. 

He has been a consistent student and 
liked by all. His greatest fault is his over- 
whelming desire to talk and, at every gath- 
ering, he must needs indulge in some vocal 
gymnastics. He is one of the chief "root- 
ers" and "cheer leaders" on the athletic 
field, and there he yells till his voice sinks 
to a "chirp." 

He is strongly thinking of the Govern- 
ment service, and we wish him the success 
he deserves. 







SAMUEL DOWNING, $ X 

Virginia 

He is better known as "Sam" or "Pop" and 
was born in the wilds of Lancaster county. 
When "Sam" graduated at the Lancaster 
High School it took a two-horse wagon to 
carry the flowers home. He has been an 
athlete of note in his high school days, and 
was noted for the perfect form of his gas- 
trocnemius, of which he was justly proud. 
A man of Chesterfieldian manners, rosy 
cheeked and everlastingly good-natured and 
wearing a smile that won't come off. Sam 
is popular with all who know him. Sam's 
ambition is to get his "Dip" and "hike" 
back home, settle down, and become a 
"pop" in reality. 



LUIGI DOMINIC DISTEFANO, 

$ A r 

Maryland 

Familiarly known as "Wop," and by 
some as "Strophanthus" and "Strabismus." 

The man with a name, not only long, but 
hard to pronounce. If you don't believe us 
ask any of the professors who call the roll. 

Luigi is happily married, and he very 
proudly refers to the fact that there are 
two little "Luigis" at home. 

A good fellow and a good student, and 
he knows the physiologic action of "coca 
cola" from "A" to "Z." 

We certainly wish him success in the ob- 
taining of his degree, and for the sake of 
the little "Luigis" we hope he will have a 
large practice. 





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-""S^ 



44 



Cl)e X'Mav, 1914 




WILLIAM BROWN DUDLEY, 
B. A., $ X 

Virginia 

Martinsville, Va., yielded "Slippers" to 
the medical profession ; on account of 
which fact they declare a public festival 
on the anniversary of his natal day. He 
is a congenial soul, is Slippers, and a good 
student. His specialty is getting Dr. Call 
balled up on quizzes. 



§^ 



JOHN BLAIR FITTS, X $, n M 

A, B. 

Virginia. 

Blair is a product of Hampden-Sidney 
College. He is the proud possessor of a 
fine red moustache. All are not agreed as 
to whether this hirsute appendage is be- 
coming to him or not — but, anyhow, we 
have gotten used to it. Chief among 
Blair's virtues is his good disposition — he 
has never been seen ruffled but once, and 
that was when a man accused him of being 
a North Carolinian. 

The troubles, cares and worries of life 
don't set very heavily on this young man; 
he just takes things as they come, and they 
usually come like he wants them. 

He is a member of that gallant band who 
have fought valiant battles on the Confed- 
erate Museum "dump," and he seems to 
have always come out unscathed. 




aii-LU-U-LiJ-i 




Cfte I^Hap, 1914 



45 



I ' 




EDWARD LATANE FLANAGAN, 
Q T $ 

Virginia 

"Still water runs deep." Born in Amelia 
County ; resides at Powhatan ; prepared for 
medicine at Randolph-Macon College, took 
three years of medicine at U. C. M., en- 
tered serior class, M. C. V., September, 
1913. He says little but thinks much, and 
his thinking results in accomplishing things. 
In his quiet unassuming way, he goes about 
his work with a determination to win, and 
has always made his work with credit. 

We do not doubt his success, for "Dr. 
Flanagan's" fame has already spread 
abroad among his many patients in Jackson 
Ward. 

To know him is to admire him, and few 
have more friends than "Lat." In him, 
with his quiet, dignified, gentlemanly man- 
ner, we see a most successful physician. 






RICHARD EDWARD FLOYD, Jr, 

"Multum in Parvo." 
Virginia 

Stop ! Look ! Listen ! 

Our genial friend materialized February 
3, 1889, at Nassawadox, Va. 

After cavorting about the Indian mounds 
of his native heath, was corralled, and pre- 
pared for his chosen vocation, the finish- 
ing touches being applied at the Franktown 
and Nassawadox High Schools. His life 
is governed by Simmon's Regulator. Dick 
is a Fellow of the Midnight Oil Burner's 
Club, and a deep student of Osteology. 




WILLIAM BURTON FOWLKES. 
A. B., $ K S, n M 

Vice-President Sopliinore Class, M. C. V. 

This boy with the golden locks was born 
in Virginia, the exact spot we cannot say. 
When we first heard of him he was armed 
with a diploma from Washington and Lee. 
Bill entered M. C. V. in 1910, and after 
many a hard "struggle" we expect him to 
receive his M. D. Bill is a deep student of 
Osteology. 



Cfje I*iaap, 1914 



47 




LOKIE M. FUTRELLE, A K K 

North Carolina 



Lokie hails from Severn, N. C, from 
which State he brought an enviable ath- 
letic and scholastic record. He has not 
lived up to this record here — he has sur- 
passed it. As athlete, scholar and holder of 
many offices in the U. C. M., he was de- 
servedly popular, and now as president of 
the student body of M. C. V. he is 
equally so. 





THOMAS FRANKLIN GARRETT 

3\ $ B n 

Virginia 

Bessie," the fair-haired Saxon, comes 
to us from Shanghai, Va., a railroad me- 
tropolis somewhere in King and Queen 
County. "Bess" possesses the heart of a 
song bird, and having a tenor voice of good 
timbre, he is prone to exercise it at various 
and sundry intervals. For the past year 
he has been acting as Relay Officer at the 
College Dispensary, where he presides in a 
glass cage, keeping a complicated system of 
books, handing out pass cards and "steer- 
ing" the "halt and the lame" (who come 
there for treatment) to the various depart- 
ments. His odd moments he spends at 
Hygeia Hospital, holding down an interne- 
ship and aiding in making some brilliant 
"diagnosees" in nervous and mental cases. 



48 



Cl)e I'laap, 1914 





ROSCOE EUGENE GLASS, S. B. 

N s, $ B n 

Florida. 



Editor-in-Chief of X-Ray, 1914. ■^ =:: 

"Senator" is the graduate of two uni- 
versities, the University of Chicago and 
John B. Stetson University. He came 
among us with great dignity, and soon won 
our highest esteem. Since his entrance he 
has been scared only once — on "practical on 
bones" — and perhaps on that occasion he 
was excusable, for everybody was in the 
same fix. 

There is no doubt that his personality, 
rotundity of person, and dignity will all 
combine to make for him a most successful 
career. 




EDWARD LE BARON GOODWIN, 

A. B., B. S. 

K S, n M, $ B K 

Virginia 

Goodwin came to the new school from ' 
the classic shades of old William and Mary. 
He had gained fame as a scientific man in 
Williamsburg, and he has kept up his repu- 
tation since he came among us. He is a 
very opinionated person, and in spite of 
Gray's Anatomy and Dr. Brodnax, he has 
always insisted that there is no such muscle 
as the Tibialis Posticus. He is going to 
Detroit in June for an interneship in the 
United States Marine Hospital, where we 
know he will reiiect credit upon his alma 
mater. 

And now prepare yourself for a great 
shock — Goodwin is going to be a medical 
missionary. Selali! 



■iTmTiTTrfrrrrpTr-rTrri-rrtTr,TTT 






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^ 




Cfte I'Kap, 1914 



49 




JAMES RAYMOND GORMAN, 
X Z X 

Virginia 

Manager of Baseball Team (M. C. V.), 
I9i2-'i3. 

James R., or "Ike," Gorman, as he is 
known, was born in Lynchburg, Va., some 
twenty-four years ago. He received his 
preliminary education in the Lynchburg 
High School, and later at Old Point Com- 
fort College, Fortress Monroe, Va. Before 
entering upon the study of medicine "Ike" 
held a very responsible position with the 
U. S. Government in Lynchburg. Like 
others, he thought there was a calling 
higher than Uncle Sam's, so in the fall of 
1910 he began the study of medicine. Since 
being in college "Ike" has made quite a 
name for himself as a business man. He 
possesses a good head, and knows how to 
use it, and is an earnest student. 




m 



KENNETH DAWSON GRAVES, 

North Carolina 
"A strictly eugenic person." 

"Be thou as pure as the driven snow. 
Thou shalt not escape calumny." 

So say we all where "Katie" is con- 
cerned. After "scholasticating" at Bedford 
City High School and Southwestern Pres- 
byterian Universitj', the parents of our 
child were in a quandary as to whether a 
"dominie" or "medico" would suit. 

"Medico" won out, and so the boy was 
sent to us to be patterned after the fashion 
of Hippocrates and others of note. He 
has succeeded, and means well. His atti- 
tude and spirit are strictly- missionary. We 
need him in our midst. Why send him to 
foreign lands? "Kate" is somewhat of a 
psychologist, giving suggestive treatment, 
when not at school. A blazing trail will 
follow wherever he treads. 




■:s^:^^^^^;^^;^^^^;;>^'j;:^^^^<^^g^^^^^ 




50 



Cfte I^map, 19X4 



■I 




JULIUS RUGG HAMILTON, 
$ A A, Q T $ 

California 

"Jule" comes to us from Southern Cali- 
fornia. He also lived in Illinois fifteen or 
twenty years — ;'. e., while he was attending 
the University there. 

His experiences are legion. To begin 
with, he discovered the gold mines of Cali- 
fornia in 1848. He would be a millionaire 
today but for the fact that he cared so 
little for money that he lost everything he 
had speculating in live-stock. Oh, yes, he 
was on the ranch several years. You can 
tell that by his walk; also by the fact that 
he wore rubber gloves in the dissecting 
hall during his freshman year. 

Jule has always been very popular with 
the professors. Some of us believe that 
he won the doctors' admiration with his 
songs. 



FREDERICK E. HAMLIN, X Z X 

North Carolina 

President Senior Class, 1914; President 
North Carolina Club. 

Another product from the land of the 
'Tarheels." Fred comes to us from Dur- 
ham, N. C, where his steps were first 
started in the ways of learning. From 
thence he went to Trinity College. In 
1910 he joined the ranks of the medicos. 

For the past year he has been interne 
at the Soldiers' Home. The old "warriors" 
all have a good word for him. They are 
afraid not to, for look at the mortality rate 
of the place ! Fred also made himself fa- 
mous this year for proposing an altogether 
new and interesting operation on the 
trachea. 

■We all join in wishing you success, Fred, 
both in medicine and domestic life. 







;-^ - .^-^-"^i ^ Xi^ =-?^''" '■.'Tz.^ 



Cfje I'Hap, 1914 




_,..^^^^^^^^ 



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52 



mt J^Hap, 1914 




HOMER SILON HENKEL, ^ X 

Virginia. 

Born in Staunton, Va., Henkel was edu- 
cated in the Staunton Military Academy. 
He migrated to New York in early life 
and acquired a grouch, from which recov- 
ery has been only partial. His pessimism, 
however, is purely personal in nature, and 
he just can't believe that he is probably 
the most cultured and one of the finest fel- 
lows in the class. His college record is 
most enviable. After serving' in the Ortho- 
pedic General Hospital, Philadelphia, next 
year, Henkel will start in on what we be- 
lieve will be an unusually bright career. 



HENRY JACKSON HAYES, 

Virginia. 

"L'horreur du vice, et I'amour de la vertu, 
sout les delices du sage." 

A local product. Prepared at Richmond 
High School and Mechanics' Institute. En- 
tered our halls of learning four years ago, 
and has made incomparable progress, and 
will continue to do so after receiving the 
coveted "skin." A palmist predicted a trip 
soon after graduating (?) — North, ol 
course. "Johnny" is timid and retiring to 
the letter, but Irish to the core. 




--^ 


\ 

7 

1 



m 





Cfte 3e*map, 1914 



53 




LEWIS SIDNEY HERNDON, 
Q T * 

Virginia. 

Football 1911-12, 1912-13. Pianist of Glee 

Club. Leader of College Orchestra. 

"Tubby" is a native of Richmond, and 
obtained his early education at Nolley's 
School. The dying words of that great 
Confederate chieftain, Stonewall Jackson, 
"Let us cross over the river and rest under 
the shade of the trees," is so applicable to 
Tubby's college career that we paraphrase 
it with all due respect to the memory of 
the South's great hero. 

In fact, Tubby's "trying" words are, in 
the winter, "Rest in bed"; in the summer, 
"Rest under the shade of the trees of 
beautiful Barton Heights, across the river 
Shockoe." Whether in sunshine or shadow, 
"Tubby" pursues leisurely the even tenor 
of his way, smoking Piedmonts, and un- 
perturbed by the flight of time. However, 
he'll "get there" after a while. 




DAVID HENDRIX HILL, 

$ N E, n M 

Virginia. 

Dave is a "pippin" from Albemarle. He 
resides in Richmond quite frequently, 
though most of his time he winters at the 
White Sulphur. Dave is the rarely seen 
"all-round" man, good at everything. He 
practiced medicine for two days in Ken- 
-tucky last summer, but is gradually recov- 
ering now. He is one of the few men in 
college who has never been known to be 
in Murphy's, day or night. Dave is going 
to make good with a vengeance. 





L ^- 



Cfje I*iaap, 1914 



n 




WHITNEY CROPPER HOLLAND 

Virginia. 
"Ever hustling, ever anxious." 

Who have we here? We knovir he is 
mortal. What else can we say? 

Having lived and prepared his mental 
faculties for the "calling" at University of 
Virginia one year and Onancock High 
School, our confrere decided to leave the 
village and come to life; which dictate he 
followed, and, no doubt, will depart as he 
entered. Our friend is a student of nature 
and fowl culture. We- predict a scientific 
branch of medicine for him as a specialty. 
Whitney's common name is "Sphinx." 



HARRY BARTON HINCHMAN, 
A. B., 

Virginia. 

Member of Memorial Hospital Nurses' 
Staff. 

"Andy," as he is known by all, is a grad- 
uate of Rock Hill College, Ellicott City, 
Md. While at Rock Hill "Andy" made 
quite a name for himself as a pitcher, and 
before he finished school he was being 
sought by several big league clubs. But 
the desire to take up medicine deafened 
him to the call of the diamond, so the 
fall of 1910 found him at the Medical 
College of Virginia. "Andy" is a very 
quiet sort of a fellow, and has won a 
place in the hearts of all of his classmates. 

We predict for him great success in his 
chosen profession and an early benedict. 

May her soul, and all the souls of the 
faithful departed rest in peace. Amen. 




iiiiiiiniminmiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiinimii 



Cfte I^iRap, 1914 



55 




JAMES MINOR HOLLA WAY, 
A K K 

Virginia. 

"Raven" "eased in" on us four years ago, 
after the roll-call, and leisurely took his 
place among us. His cranium being sparse- 
ly "settled" with hair, it became the ob- 
ject of many friendly "pats" which would 
have aroused the animosity of 'most any 
one but "Joe." He takes things as they 
come — never "ruffled," never angry. Inci- 
dently, "Raven" has made good as a stu- 
dent and made himself famous back home 
by administering typhoid vaccine to the 
natives. "Raven" possesses another nick- 
name — "Sure." 



FRANCIS BEATTIE HUTTON, Jr., 
X $, T N E 

Virginia. 

Annual staff 1913-14. 

He is better known as "Pete." He has 
been seen hanging around college quite a 
good deal of late, and we now suspect that 
he will graduate. Seriously, Pete has a 
good mind and a wonderful memory, and 
that is why we say that he has made good 
and will make a successful practitioner, in 
spite of his youth and rosy cheeks. 




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^iiC %'Mm 1914 




WILLIAM RAMSEY LAIRD, Jr., 
* X 

Virginia. 
President Sophmore Class, U. C. M., 'ii-'i2. 

"Student," "Dr. Crile," "Murphy," "Wil- 
lie" — call him what you will, and he will 
come to tell you why he isn't going to make 
the next "quiz." This goes to show that 
he is a pessimist, as regards himself. He 
zi/ill wear loud ties and write an utterly 
illegible hand. Otherwise he is almost hu- 
man. As President of the Sophomore Class 
(U. C. M.) he called class meetings regu- 
larly after each quiz on anatomy, but never 
gained his point. 

"Student's" chief accomplishments are 
eternally and everlastingly shaking hands, 
giving verbatim the cause of the ureters 
and talking about his Alma Mater. 



^ 




ROBERT CHARLES LEDDY, 

Connecticut. 

Leddy, the "Cosmopolite," comes to us 
from Baltimore Medical College. He is a 
typical New Englander and proud of it. 
"Bob" is the champion borrower of cig- 
arettes in college, Di Stefano being the 
chief source of supply. "Stef" says he had 
hoped the acute stage of Piedmontitis had 
passed, but finds, on going over his stock, 
that the "total count" is still high. After 
all, "Bob" is a good "scout," friendly, open- 
hearted and generous, and will always do 
you a favor — if you give him a cigarette. 




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Cbe xmav, 1914 



57 




BENJAMIN LIPSHUTZ, 
New Jersey. 

"Ben" wandered down South from the 
wilds of New Jersey to study medicine at 
M. C. V. four years ago. He has been 
successful, to say the least, and we hope 
that he has secured sufficient knowledge 
to wrestle with that famous animal. The 
Jersey "Skeeter." 

Note. — He is famous for taking post- 
mortem pulse and temperature. 




JOHN WILLIAM MARTIN, H M 




^^^^ 



^U I=Elap, 1014 




WALLER NELSON MERCER, 
O T $ 

Virginia. 
Sec.-Treas. Junior Class, U. C. M., '12-13. 
"A high head holds he, 
For a surgeon in the navy he expects to 
be." 
Nelson is of local origin, and made him- 
self more or less famous by advocating 
"calomel with soda." He is always in a 
good humor and ready for a joke, espe- 
cially when there is to be a drill of the 
Hospital Corps. 

As a student, he is good ; as a maker 
of friends, he is better. The latter is well 
shown by the way he "bums" free rides 
out of the milkman when "Dr. Johnny" 
calls early in the morning. Recently Mer- 
cer picked a huge dill by making the ex- 
aminations for interne at Gouverneur Hos- 
pital, New York. We expect him to grad- 
uate with high honors. 



BURLEIGH NICHOLS HEARS, 
n J\I 

Virginia. 

"Fats" is a "well-nourished" individual, 
born on the Eastern Shore some time in 
the early nineties. Since birth he has 
steadily gained weight. At the tender age 
of sixteen he entered Hampden-Sidney Col- 
lege, and in his "shape" the coach recog- 
nized a football star. Today it stands a 
monument to Richmond's boarding houses. 

He is a very consistent lover and studies 
some whenever he can find time. So we 
predict for him a great professional and 
domestic career. 




irsr:!-:^ -S. ;■: 






EDGAR P. NORFLEET, $ B n 

North Carolina. 

Behold, another long, lean product from 
Carolina, better known as "Scholar." He 
comes to us from among the mosquitoes 
of Roxobel. He is long and narrow, reach- 
ing about six feet in altitude and pulls the 
scales for 140. 

E. P. comes to us from Trinity and War- 
rington High School, where he received his 
preliminary education. His career has been 
a successful one. While an embryo saw- 
bone, he starred as a student of osteology, 
always becoming frightened as the lecture 
hour approached, when he would come face 
to face with "Bobbie." Nevertheless, at the 
final roll-call, he was among the first, while 
in the dissecting hall he was also noted for 
his ability as a "yarn-spinner." 




WALTER JOSEPH OTIS, Q Y $ 

Louisiana. 

"Father" comes to us from New Or- 
leans, but with the love of Philadelphia 
in his heart. If he wears any gray hairs, 
'tis not due to age nor trouble for his 
own self, but he carries a mind for many 
others on his shoulders. 

He has, for the last year, enjoyed the 
position as chairman of a band of senior 
volunteers, who are doing research work 
in the interest of the neurotic and feeble- 
minded element of our population. 

It is interesting to note "Father's" ad- 
miration for the South and Southern meth- 
ods. To the hospitals which he may visit 
he will no doubt take some excellent ideas 
of method and technique. 

It is not uncommon to find "Father," per- 
haps in evening (?) dress, confidentially 
explaining to central what he thinks of the 
Richmond telephone company's service. 






'liiriiiimiii 



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Cbe J'Hap, 1914 



6i 





J. O. PARRAMORE, K S, H M 

Virginia. 

"Croak" is a product of Hampton, Va., 
and is of uncertain age. He is a quiet man 
at times, but has a habit of making himself 
conspicuous on occasions, such as in foot- 
ball games and on exams. He is especially 
strong on knowing more than he let's peo- 
ple think he knows. At right half he is as 
much at home as a crab on his native beach, 
and it is said that he is^ some golf player. 
(See Dr. Moon.) Those who know him 
best speak of him as "the best man I know," 
which sums up his character. 



ROBERT LUCAS OZLIN, K W 

Virginia. 

"Laugh and the world laughs with you." 
Robert possesses the soul of an optimist 
and he works his "risorius" night and day. 
He recently made himself famous by dem- 
onstrating a case of asthma in medical 
clinic. "Robert" could hardly keep his face 
still, even when Dr. "Billy" was looking at 
him. An excellent student and athlete and 
true friend, we wish to shake your hand, 
lad, and wish you well on your mission in 
this sad old world. 




— 1 VT -Tr-Wrl-t-^T "r >. 1 - ,^ ■ 



62 



Clje I^dap, 1914 







JOHN CLANCY PARRISH, $ B H 

Virginia. 

Vice-President, Junior Class, 1912-13. Vice- 
President, Senior Class, 1913-14. 
John came to us from that section of 
Virginia which is famous the world over 
for Smithfield hams and peanuts. He is 
possessed of that wonderful quality of 
minding his own business ; yet he has al- 
ways a smile and a word of good cheer. He 
has been a hard worker for the Y. M. C. A., 
and it is unnecessary to say that he is a 
good student and will make a success in 
medicine. 



GEORGE WILLIAM PARROTT, 

Virginia. 

Charlottesville, Va., has the honor of be- 
ing the native city of "Polly." "Polly" 
has always been a booster of the great 
"Valley of Virginia." He tells us of a prize 
pig raised down home with tushes 14 inches 
long. The diet of this wonderful hog has 
long been a matter of conjecture. It is 
generally conceded that it must have been 
raised on "Pepo." Polly is a member of 
the Married Men's Club and has a host 
of friends in college. Having a life com- 
panion, such as he has, Polly's success in 
his chosen field is assured wherever he 
locates. 






Cfte I^iaap, 1914 



63 




SETH BRIDGEMAN PERRY, K W 

North Carolina. 

President Masonic Club. 

"Penoid" hales from Williamstown, a 
thriving little city in the "Tarheel" State, 
and took his preparatory work in the Pied- 
mont High School of his native heath. 
During his freshman year at U. C. M. he 
made himself famous for his knowledge 
of the sphenoid (penoid) bone when Dr. 
Bobbie held dominion over things osteo- 
logical. Being a sufferer with alopecia 
areata, he is a great believer in Biers' hy- 
peremic treatment for the scalp, having ex- 
hausted other remedies. During his senior 
year he has resided at the City Jail Hos- 
pital. At this pleasure resort he developed 
his voice yelling down the corridors, "Who's 
sick" and has also grown proficient in the 
making of epsom "salts" cocktails. He is 
the originator of the famous ammonia 
treatment for "fits." 



^ 



BERNARD B. PITKOWITZ, 

New York. 

"Pick" first saw the light in dear old Lon- 
don town ten months after his natal day ; 
that is, when the fog lifted. He is of an 
effervescing disposition, being short of 
stature and naturally given to small talk. 
Pick has graced three honorable institu- 
tions of learning in his educational career, 
namely, Michigan State College, George 
Washington University and Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia. We predict that, with 
such ample foundation, he will be an honor 
to his triple Alma Mater. We believe that 
he intends either to wield the opthalmo- 
scope or to take the mantle of Dr. Mc- 
Gavock at some future date. 

He has no bad habits — to speak of. 



m 








64 



Cfte I-'iaap, 1914 




LOUIS LEAK PUTNEY, K W 
Virginia. 

On January 21, 1890, "Big" Putney (Inez) 
drew a lung and one-half full of Prince 
Edward county air and emitted three lusty 
shrieks, thereby proclaiming himself a per- 
manent citizen of the city of Darlington 
Heights. Possessed of more than ordi- 
nary energy, he soon launched a diversi- 
fied career, in which he has planted tobacco, 
got licked at school, run Baptist prayer- 
meetings, learned a dignified bearing at 
Fork Union Military Academy, sold life 
insurance to the innocent, and has been 
taking medicine by brain for four years. 

His big, open face, bigger heart, honest 
purpose and ability, will make him as de- 
servingly popular in his future community 
as he has been in college. 



ROBERT HERBERT PUTNEY, 

$ B n 

Virginia. 

"Little" Putney gave his first yell in 
Guinea Mills, Va., November 7, 1889. Born 
"little," he has stayed that way, and al- 
ways answers to the name of "Little" Put- 
ney. His preliminary ' education has been 
liberal in picking horn-worms, stemming 
tobacco and learning military tactics at 
Fork Union. As a medical student he has 
neither flunked on a single class nor spoken 
to any professor. He possesses a quiet 
dignity that makes for him friends and a 
memory that fails him not. Without ceas- 
ing he injects into all conversation at op- 
portune and inopportune moments experi- 
ences from his last summer's coal mine 
practice. Not satisfied with the usual med- 
ical course with nurses, he has become a 
most ardent specialist ; his tireless endeav- 
ors assuring early reward. 



m 




^=^^r^ 



lilMiilllh 



CI)e J*map, 1914 



65 




ISRAEL KAY REDD, A K K 

Virginia. 

Izzy is our extremist. He can study- 
harder (before exams) and play harder 
than any man in the class. He will take 
hospital work in Norfolk next year, after 
which he expects to take "post" work in 
New York. He will be most successful in 
whatever branch of medicine he takes up. 
Izzy is also a deep student of "Osteology." 



1-^ii 



CHARLES THOMAS ROEBUCK, 

North Carolina. 

"Surgeon" hails from Williamston, N. C, 
and rs a "Tarheel" born and a "Tarheel" 
bred. He usually selects a seat in the class- 
room far back from the Dill Pickers' row, 
where he sits in solitary state. He has fur- 
nished more amusement than any man in 
class, and does it in an unconscious way 
that always "brings down the house." 
There is not a better hearted boy in college, 
and he possesses a keen intellect that he 
tries hard to hide. "Surge" is a regular 
interrogation point, and he quizzes the 
"profs" on all occasions. It is reported he 
is well known at the Colonial. 





66 



Cf)e X'Mav. 1914 





CHARLES LEWIS RUDASILL, 

n M 

Virginia. 

Rudasill hails from Creiglersville, Va. 
He was educated at Locust Dale Academy, 
and since his entrance here has made an 
enviable record. ' He is quiet and given to 
the estimable habit of taking many notes 
in class. What he undertakes he finishes, 
and there is no doubt but that his future 
career will be but a continuation of his suc- 
cess attained here. . 




JAMES EDWARD SHULER 




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Cfte X'Mav, 1914 



67 




ARTHUR CLAYTON SINTON, Jr. 
B. A., K S, n M 

Virginia. 

His real name is Mike, and it is abso- 
lutely untrue that he is conceited ; he will 
tell you so himself. Jovial, easy-going and 
graceful, he is one of the hardest students 
in school, and his success in the "Big Four" 
examinations was well earned. He is presi- 
dent of a Baraca class and author of the 
well-known aphorism, "Work hard and live 
pure." His monograph, recently published 
in the New York Medical Journal on "The 
Symptomatology of Stone in the Common 
Duct" was most highly spoken of. Seri- 
ously, Mike is an unusually bright man, 
and when time shall dole to each of us the 
true reward of our labors, his name will 
stand in its usual place around about the 
top of the list. 




JOSEPH SMITH, $ P S 

North Carolina. 

Joe has made a deep impression upon 
those with whom he has come in contact 
as a most earnest and thorough student. 
He passed examinations for a New York 
appointment. It has been often commented 
on that he has never been known to speak 
unkindly of any one. He is admired, re- 
spected and liked by every one who knows 
him. 



68 



Cbe X'Mav, 1914 




LEWIS BETTY STATON, 
e A X, Q T $ 

Virginia. 

Vice-Pres. Freshman Class, U. C. M., 1910; 

Art Editor X-Ray, 1914. 

Lewis B. was born some time during the 
nineteenth century in or around Richmond ; 
and, even though confronted by such odds, 
he grew up and waxed older each suc- 
ceeding year, till now he measures 5 feet 
51-10 inches in Hanover shoes ($3.00). 
According to Dr. Mac Newton, he should 
extend sVz more inches during the next 
decade. (See table.) 

Now, Lewis is equally well noted for en- 
tertaining the student body with daily car- 
toons as for his ability as a physical diag- 
nostician (?). Staton possesses the cardi- 
nal attributes of a successful M. D. — knowl- 
edge of carbureters, dignity, cool head, 
cleanliness, and a perfect system of book- 
keeping. 



^ HENRY SYCLE STERN, 

Virginia. 

Secretary Senior Class, 1914. 
This dark-haired specimen is of local 
origin and a devotee of the tango and Cas- 
tle walk at the Jefferson Club. Except on 
rare occasions, "Heinie" is always in a 
good humor, earnest and unpretentious, and 
is absolutely unselfish in his estimate of 
his fellowmen. The versatility of his mind 
is a puzzle to his closest friends. He is 
the Nemesis of Otis and takes pleasure in 
calling down that worthy. Heinie is a 
great believer in Pineoleum for the nasal 
mucous membrane, and distributed samples 
freely in the dispensary. He has great 
aspirations to become a "Jacobi." As a 
student he reflects credit on his class. 




= ^^ 



Cfte I^Uap, 1914 



69 




ROBERT RAYMOND STEWART, 
$ X 

Virginia. 

"Troubles sit but lightly on his shoul- 
ders." 

He comes from the mountains of Vir- 
ginia, and you would expect him to have 
as a nickname "Bob" or "Ray," but. alas ! 
it is not so. He is known by the name of 
"Mary." But there is nothing at all femi- 
nine about this dark -haired beauty(?) 
"Mary" has that happy faculty of making 
friends and keeping them, also of making 
tickets with very little exertion, although 
he is a hard "boner." 

We wish you the success you deserve and 
a large practice when you hang out your 
shingle. 



LEWIS T. STONEBURNER, A. B., 

$ B n 

Virginia. 
President Athletic Association, I9i3-'i4. 

"Stoney" is true to his name, for he is 
a hard student and takes life seriously. 
Also, last year he took unto himself a 
wife. He is considered the most reliable 
man in his class — always on time and ready 
to take notes. His favorite occupation is 
calling roll for Billy and eating pie. 

We wish you the success you so richly 
deserve. 





t':5,^<ii^5^^M^.4< 



liiillillllllilllliilil 



70 



CI)e t'Mav, 1914 



m^ 




WILLIAM P. THOMPSON, X Z X 

North Carolina. 

Bill, better known as "Fuzzy, How Are 
Fizzed?" and as the "Grand Master of the 
Ancient Order of United Dill Pickers," 
founded at M. C. V. 1837, Q. S. A. D. He 
picks them t- i. d. a. c. and p. c. in a half 
a glass of hop extract. 

Bill came to M. C. V. after having made 
a failure of everything else, and decided 
to study medicine. His great ambition is 
to be a real "doctor," which he will be as 
"soon as he gets his degree. We wish him 
much success. 



ROBERT E. TIMBERLAKE, X Z X 
Virginia. 

Robin, better known as "Nutrient," comes 
to us from Atlee, A^a. 

Robin's "long suit" is "hirin " wood, as 
Connell's woodpile shows. He is also some- 
thing of a miser and never takes any flan- 
nel nickles for fear they will shrink. 

He is a conscientious worker and good 
student, and has made good. Of late he 
has become addicted to the wearing of 
"yaller" shoes. His ambition is to get 
started in his profession and get married. 





^^^^^: 




Ct)e J'laap, 1914 



71 




GEORGE ABBITT TORRENCE, 
X Z X 

Virginia. 

George came to us from the old histori- 
cal town of Appomattox, Va. Here he re- 
ceived his preliminary education at Appo- 
mattox High School and romping over the 
fields and hills where Lee made his last 
stand- 
George is a good fellow and is popular 
among the fellows as well as among the 
fairer sex. 

He has been a successful student, and, a 
thing most remarkable, he has no nick- 
name, but he seems to be somewhat of a 
kodak fiend and a traveller. Most of his 
travelling is done via the Seven Pines car 
line. We know not where he goes. 



=- m 



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-— 


---.■1 




GEORGE BOYD TYLER, 

$ A e, $ X 

Virginia. 

Boyd is quiet and unassuming, a hard 
worker and deservedly popular, and all this 
spells success. He lives at Gwathmey, Va., 
and on his daily trips to and from Rich- 
mond acts as medical advisor to his fellow- 
commuters- Next year he expects to be in 
the Marine Hospital at Chicago. 




^^^^^^^^^^ 



72 



Ci)e I^Bap, 1914 



A = 




JOHN BARRETT WALKER, 

North Carolina- 

"Little Walker" came to our fold from 
the University of North Carolina, where 
he completed his first two years of medi- 
cal work, joining the M. C. V.'s in his 
junior year, and has combatted the foes, 
both physically and mentally, with forti- 
tude. He says he might consider an in- 
terneship, but by reason of a highly pos- 
sessed affinity for the fairer sex his time 
proves most too precious for such an ap- 
parent trifle. We presume a life partner 
is the urgent goal. 

Being a member of the widely distrib- 
uted order of Freemasons, he consults, in 
secrecy, his own judgment as to his pleas- 
ures and affairs. We shall allow him to 
"precipitate" back "down home," where we 
commend him to the patronage of his na- 
tive State, feeling confident that he will 
serve them creditably. 



HOWARD URBACH, $ B H 

Virginia. 

Urbach is our champion "dill picker." He 
can find dills where even dark field illumi- 
nation would fail to show them. He is very 
much married, and after the training got- 
ten in raising his son, expects to be equipped 
for specializing in pediatrics. He is one 
man who numbers all friends and no ene- 
mies among his acquaintances. He will be 
a great success. 





Cfte X'Mav, 1914 



73 



m 




HOMER ALLEN WALKUP, B. S., 

West Virginia. 

Walkup hails from the hills of West Vir- 
ginia, and was thought at one time to have 
been connected with the famous Hatfield 
and McCoy feuds- He corries to us from 
the University of West Virginia, where he 
took his first two years in medicine. From 
his flow of language he ofttimes reminds us 
of the therapeutic action of that unofficial 
drug, sumbul. Though at one time closely 
associated with Dr. Winn, he differed with 
him on a question of infection and dis- 
solved partnership. At the present time he 
is engaged in cultivating a benign growth 
on his upper lip, which is quite flourishing. 

An energetic worker and good student, 
he has made an excellent record in college. 



JAMES CLOWDLEY WALKER, 

N S N 

Minnesota. 

Football Team 1912-13, Captain Football 
Team 1913-14. 

James Clowdley is his real name, yet we 
know him by the name of "Jim." He is the 
biggest and best natured man in the class. 
"Jim" was Walter Camp's selection for 
tackle on the Ail-American team of 1910. 
At that time he was studying medicine at 
the University of Minnesota- 
He decided to try the Sunny South, and 
entered M. C. V. in 1912, and on first sight 
all who saw his smiling face liked him. 

Jim, if you conduct yourself in your 
chosen profession as you do on the grid- 
iron, success is yours for the asking. 




r— 


i 




s^^"^^^^^^ 



MMiiiiiiiimiiiiiL 




74 



Cf)e J^map, 1914 




LIEF ELMER WALTON, K W 

West Virginia. 

Late in the nineteenth century the peo- 
ple of some unknown place near the banks 
of the Greenbrier river were startled at 
the arrival of a boy who was to bear the 
marks of a thoroughbred West Virginian- 
He thrived among the hills for several 
years, and after spending a few years at 
the University of West Virginia, migrated 
to U. C. M. 

Lief was a very diligent student until the 
latter part of his junior year, when a change 
came over him. This explained why he 
sat in class in deep meditation, with a long- 
ing expression, as if to say, "Only a few 
months and we shall go back to the dear 
old hills." We predict for Lief an early 
matrimonial adventure and extend to her 
our sympathy. 




^ ROBERT GRAHAM WIATT, $ X 



Mrginia. 

"Sir Robert Gallbladder Wiatt" attained 
his title by always holding his head up and 
maintaining his dignity, even under the 
great stress of being associated for four 
years with a class of "medical students" — 
a feat announced by the majority as being 
impossible. His middle name was attained 
by his great experience with, and operations 
upon, the said organ. "Bob" is said to be 
especially fond of certain kinds of music 
(but there are only a few of his most inti- 
mate friends who know this). He has been 
an excellent, consistent student, standing at 
the very top of his class, and whether the 
roll was called or not, Wiatt was always 
there to answer, Here. A pair of brown 
or black eyes may deviate him occasionally, 
but he never forgets the serious duties of 
college life- 




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iiini.'iiiiM 



CI)e X'Mav, 1914 



75 




WILLIAM JOHNS WIGINGTON 

Virginia. 

"Some upon relatively small diet form 
much fat, while others remain thin despite 
the consumption of large amounts of food." 

"Wiggie" hails from the lofty mountains 
of the celebrated Southwest Virginia, com- 
ing from Rocky Mount, Va. 

Possessed of soft speech and modest and 
retiring in nature, he usually secures a 
front seat, so he won't have to answer very 
loud to the roll-call. For this reason he 
has been unjustly claimed by the "Dill Pick- 
ers' " Club. He does not have much to 
say, but makes good as a student, and we 
feel he will succeed when he goes home and 
starts dispensing urotropin and C. C. pills 
to the laity. 





STERLING EDWIN \\TLHOIT, 
K W 

Virginia. 

He comes to us from the scenes of Fox's 
great novel, "The Trail of the Lonesome 
Pine," and it is even rumored that he has 
posed for several artists besides the 
"movies." 

Sterling is popular in class and known 
to the whole student body; a member of 
several prominent clubs that hold regular 
meetings above the amphitheatre. He has 
never been known to let pleasure interfere 
with studies nor studies interfere with his 
attendance on the fair sex, and yet he is 
classed as a good student, and will surely 
make good. 





m 



76 



mt I'Bap, 1914 






DON CREED WILLS, 

Virginia. 

Wills is a product of the Old Dominion, 
having decided to study medicine some time 
ago, and graced us with his presence ; and 
we are glad that he decided to cast his 
lot with us, for he has been a most ad- 
mirable fellow, always willing to help and 
lend a hand, and yet he never intrudes. 
There should be a big success awaiting the 
day when you shall open your office. 



WILLIAM MOORE WILLIS, 
A K K 

North Carolina. 

Captain Basketball Team 1914- 

This admirable young man began his 
medical career at Wake Forest College, N. 
C. After following in the footsteps of 
Hippocrates for one year in that institu- 
tion, he betook himself to Richmond and 
entered the University College of Medicine. 
On landing here he was promptly dubbed 
"Turkey," not on account of his likeness 
to that bird, but more to his fleetness of 
foot. In fact, we feel that the mantle 
of Mercury has fallen upon him. Since 
entering here he has m_aintained a high 
standard as a student, ranking among the 
first of his class. "Turkey" is a man of 
pleasing address and forceful personality, 
having full command of kis powers- 







l^ 




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■ iJiU-UJ-UJJ-lJJ-LUi 




Cfte X'Mav, 1914 



77 




THOMAS HOOPER WILSON, 

North Carolina. 

"Dick was the pride of his father's life, 
so he was permitted to choose his own ca- 
reer. We first hear of him in the land 
of the Tarheels, picking huckleberries for 
his own palate. Tiring of this gastronomic 
diversion, he wandered into the Trinity 
Park School, where he had a diploma 
thrust upon him. Having a bloodthirsty 
desire for fame, he entered the class of 
1914 four years ago. 

The god of Luck is a boon companion 
of Dick's, and he can cut more classes 
and take more chances at any game than 
any other man in school — and the curious 
part is, he always comes out ace high. 

Genial, good-natured and honest, we wish 
him the best luck in Life's great game. 



i 



CARL BUCHANAN YOUNG, 
X Z X 

Virginia. 
"Short, but sweet." 

This product of Virginia hails from 
Lynchburg, "the city of hills." 

Young, familiarly known as "Kid," 
claims to be a ball player, and has distin- 
guished himself on several occasions. Aside 
from knowing a little baseball, "Kid" has 
been most successful in his studies, and 
stands today with a clean sheet. 

"Kid" received his preliminary education 
at Rock Hill College, Ellicott City, Md. 

By the way, Kid's hair is curly and is of 
a blondish hue. He is almost as big around 
as he is tall (which is not much over five 
feet, hence the "short, but sweet"). He is 
decidedly loquacious and attempts to sing 
at times. For further information see the 
Nurses' Training School- 





35n ^emorp 

of 

O^ur 25elotieii Classmate anb iFrienb 

Herop ^mitf) 25ennett 

2?orn— J^ofaemfaer 20, 1888. 
J^ieb— ipEbruarp 14, 1914. 




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Clje I*iaap, 1914 




WEBSTER M. CHANDLER 

\'irginia. 

"We recognize a gentleman by instinct." 

The worst thing that can be said about 
"Webby" is that he came from Norfolk. 
In the history of the college he has been 
the second student to pass the State board 
as a Junior. He is a good sample of that 
English classic type of gentlemen that take 
the difficult college turns as a matter of 
course and does them as any Virginian 
should. Fifty years ago he would have 
been a colonel certainly. If he does not 
make his mark in dentistry, it is because 
he is making it somewhere else. 




HOWARD L. BOATWRIGHT 
S T $ 

Virginia. 

"Much might be said on both sides." 

He came from New Canton, Va., a fact 
that he has almost lived down. Boat- 
wright occupies the unique position of hav- 
ing been Senior, Junior and Graduate in 
one month — but he does not believe in 
specialties. He is now preparing for the 
grand finale, when he hopes to finish amid 
the blare of trumpets and roar of cannon. 
Here's to a square deal from the world 
and Kismet. 



>^?^^^:;^^f^^^^^ 





Cfje %'Mav, 1914 




VIVIAN V. GILLUM, 
¥ O 

Virginia. 

"I am not of the ordinary race of men." 

Vivian V. V. is one of the illustrious 
nine of Orange county, Va. His father is 
manager and his eight brothers compose 
one of the world's best known baseball 
teams. However, he is out for dentistry 
now, and we know that he will make all 
of his bases and cross the home plate of 
his desire- It would surprise us just as 
much to learn that "Pete" had become a 
general as it would to hear of him playing 
the coward. But he will always be found 
a close friend of the Generals and a credit 
to dentistry. 




M 





ROBERT FOWLER HAM ETON, 
E ¥$ 

Virginia. 

Vice President Student Body, 1914 

"A man's best fortune or his worst is his 
wife." 

Hamilton came very near being born on 
the R., F. & P., but for some reason, at 
the last moment, he chose Portsmouth- 
why, I do not know ! And in spite of this 
he , has grown up with a level head and 
plenty of perseverance. At school he was 
voted the vice-presidency of the student 
body, and is going further D. V. We 
hazard a guess that his next aspiration is 
a seat on the State board (?), and, if the 
R., F. & P. is on time, he will make it. 





r^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



82 



mt i*map, 1914 





DENNIS FLEET KEEL. 
E T $ 

North Carolina. 

We suspect Keel of being a man good 
enough for any graduating class. Our 
evidence is not all in as yet, but we are 
optimistic. He could make good in several 
other callings, if necessary. If North Caro- 
lina happened to be on the market, he 
would make a good barker for them. Den- 
nis claims that it will never be, but, if it 
ever is, he will buy it in himself. He 
"allows" that you can't have too much of 
it. However, politics or dentistry will find 
him on a front seat- He has the happy 
faculty of making many friends, and has 
as much ability as assurance. Here's to a 
successful man. 



i 




I'AH 



WILLIAM GREEK WAGNER, 

North Carolina. 

"God made him; therefore, let him pass 
for a man." 

Wagner, dear boy, hails from Vox, N. C. 
In our early acquaintance with Wagner we 
had rather hazy ideas of just where Vox 
was hidden in the land of tar and turpen- 
tine- But, as time passes on, the doctor 
so dilated on the magnitude, importance 
and beauty of Vox that we have finally 
come to think more of Vox than of Billy. 
However, he is sure of his degree and a 
bright future, having already passed the 
State board. We understand that Wagner 
was called — called just as a parson is called; 
but we are not prepared to say whether 
the voice coming from this mysterious 
place was human or not. However, here's 
hoping. 




W'rM 



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Senior Pftarmacp 



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84 



Cl)e X'May, 1914 




LAWSON W. ARMENTROUT, 
Z A X 

Virginia. 

Pharmaceutical Association. 

"Trout" is the most lady-like fellow 
among our number, and we can readily 
imagine that he would cut quite a figure 
in a split skirt. He even goes so far as 
to faint in the laboratory every now and 
then. The smartest man in the class, and 
knows just how to go after a book so as to 
get the most out of it. His enormous ap- 
petite has made him the horror of all the 
boarding-house landladies with whom he 
has boarded. 




m 



EDWART PERRY BERLIN, 

Virginia. 

Pharmaceutical Association. 

Berlin is generally recognized as the 
babe of our class. It is a real delight at 
times to hear his childish prattle, but there's 
lots of sense stored away in his cute little 
cranium. He's real cherubic looking, too; 
but, you know, there's a saying that looks 
are often deceiving. 




2:^=^>Y^^e^^^^=^:-r->^ 





Chanting comes to us from the "Flowery 
Kingdom," and his glowing tales of finan- 
cial opportunity in that sunny land have 
won the hearts of F. B- Smith and "Bob" 
Hawkins, who declare he shall not return 
unaccompanied. Chung is no bookworm, 
but he gets there just the same, and is the 
real sport of the class. 





GEORGE BERGER COCKE, H 6 S 

Virginia. 

The fattest man in the class. According 
to Mr. Rudd, he has enough potential en- 
ergy stored up in the way of fat to exist 
longer without food than a camel can with- 
out water. He would have made a hit as 
a missionary to some cannibal island of 
the South Sea. He has done considerable 
research work upon the effect of cider upon 
the human metabolism, and his success 
along this line has led him to decide to 
spend the rest of his days trying to figure 
out the problem, "why cider becomes hard." 



86 



CI)e I=Jaap, 1914 




M 



GEORGE VAN DURRER, 

Virginia. 

Pharmaceutical Association. 

"Gus" passed the -State board this year, 
but has decided to remain with us long 
enough to annex a Ph. G., which, we pre- 
dict, he will accomplish with comparative 
ease. At almost any hour you can hear his 
melodious (?) voice ringing through the 
laboratory in quest of his graduate or 
burette, as the case may be. 



HENRY THOMAS HALEY, Z A X 

Virginia. 
Pharmaceutical Association. 

This good-looking young man hails from 
Christiansburg, and is proud of it- A good 
student, a good fellow and just chuck full 
of good, hard common sense. We predict 
for him a full measure of success in his 
chosen profession, and he richly deserves it. 




Cfte X'Mav, 19X4 



EDWARD M. HARDIN, ONE 
North Carolina. 
Sec.-Treas. Athletic Association (i) ; Pres- 
ident Pharmaceutical Association (2), 
'14; Publication Board Annual (2), Foot- 
ball, Class Prophet. 

During his two years in college he has 
been an ideal student. Few men have been 
more successful in every phase of college 
life, and he has been espcially successful 
in planning his attacks upon the hearts and 
affections of the Richmond belles. He is 
the biggest and best-looking man in the 
class, and his unquestioned ability and gen- 
ial manner have won for him the confi- 
dence and popularity of his classmates and 
instructors. Hardin is president of the 
Pharmaceutical Association and a member 
of the Athletic Association Nominating 
Committee, and has won other honors too 
numerous to mention. We all predict for 
him a brilliant future. 




.^^^^^^^^ 



;i JiUiJiiu 1 1 1 i M 'J 1.1.1.1 111 1 1 1 1 u 1 1 M 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 umjii I 



88 




Cfje xmny, 1914 




ROBERT K. HAWKINS 




Virginia. 

Secretary Junior Class, M. C. 
President Class, '14. 



v., 1913. 



''Bob" is of the genus homo termed 
"sport." That he is a general favorite 
is evidenced by the fact that we chose him 
as President to guide us through our Sen- 
ior year. Not only is he liked by the boys, 
but is strong with the fair sex. He can 
usually be found at a dance when not 
studying. He is one of whom the class 
of 1914 now, and will in future, take a 
great pride. 




RICHARD M. HAWTHORNE 
Z A X 

Virginia. 

Vice-Pres. Junior Class, M. C. V., '13; Sec- 
Treas. Student Body, '14. 

To the ladies of Richmond "Dick's" name 
need not be near his picture. He hails 
from Lunenburg county, where, perhaps, 
he got his inspirations, but not to study 
pharmacy. He is a great advocate of wo- 
man suffrage, and thinks the ballot in the 
hands of women will remedy every form 
of existing evil. He is especially pleased 
with the new styles of dress, and believes 
the "harem" comes nearest the ideal. 
"Dick" is a good-looking boy, and we all 
covet his friendship. 



-l^^^^^^^^^^b-JSr^ ' ^^:^^ 




Cf)e %'Mav, 1914 



89 




JOHN BEVERLY HOLLAND, 

Virginia. 

Pharmaceutical Association. 

"Gee Whiz" or "Duke Arbuckles" wan- 
dered down to us from upper Virginia. He 
shines in chemistry, having found out, after 
a long series of experiments, that H2O is 
the correct formula for water, and he has 
a bad habit of exploding hydrogen genera- 
tors- He is never at a loss for something 
to say, punctuating every remark with 
"Gee whiz !" He expects to devote his time 
to the upbuilding of his profession in the 
little town of Boyce, Va., and if he makes 
good as a citizen, as he has as a student, 
well may the "Boycians" be proud of him. 




CARL LAFAYETTE INGRAM, 

Virginia. 
President Junior Class, M. C. V. 




90 



Cf)e I*map, 1014 



^ 




^:^ 



CLARENCE GERNALD JACKSON 

Virginia. 

Pharmaceutical Association, Secretary- 
Treasurer of Class '14. 

"Stonewall" is from down in King and 
Queen county, where the stillness of the 
night is broken only by the doleful croak 
of a bullfrog or the crow of a rooster. 
He had the impudence to tell Mr. Rudd that 
barium sulphate was insoluble, which dis- 
play of wisdom was quite surprising. 
Jack is one of our best students, but 
finds time to keep up with the latest in 
the "movies." He says it is habit-forming. 



WILLIAM LYNN IRWIN, n 6 S 

Virginia. 

Bill's ancestors came from old Sparta 
and settled among the vine-clad rocks and 
citron groves of Woodstock. He is a real 
favorite and liked by all with whom he has 
been associated. He is always in a good 
humor, and has made a host of friends 
among his classmates. Bill is exceedingly 
brilliant, especially in chemistry, and his 
chief joys are to make all the noise possible 
while at work in the laboratories and dis- 
cuss the pharmacy bills with legislators. 




Cfte %'Mnv, 1914 



91 



LEWIN ANDREW JOHNSON, 
Z A X ' 




92 



Cl)e I^iaap, 1914 




ROBERT LEROY MILLER, 

North Carolina. 

Pharmaceutical Association. 

"Robert" is the best little timepiece we 
have. Every day promptly at twelve he 
strolls into the laboratory, jamming the 
last of an apple pie into his face. He 
drifted up to us from the Tarheel State, 
and we believe the change has done him 



EVARTS WALTON MORROW, 

nes 

West Virginia. 

Pharmaceutical Association. 

"Liquor" is the greatest consumer of 
food known to the pharmaceutical depart- 
ment. He still contends that C2H5OH is a 
food. Truly there is quite an encouraging 
prospect revealed in the future for Evarts, 
though he will never be more than a second- 
rate "toxicologist," if any at all. Yet his 
charming voice and good looks (?) will 
win for him friends and make his life 
easy. 




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mt I'Clap, 1914 



93 



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SAMUEL HONEY PARKINS, Jr., 

Virginia. 

Pharmaceutical Association. 

"Sam" is a real lady-killer. Every day 
he is deluged with delicately perfumed mis- 
sives from unknown members of the fair 
sex, and really, after looking Sam over, 
we can't blame the "sweet young things-" 
He has made love to everything dressed up 
in woman's clothes he has met, and doubt- 
less he meant it all. 



DAVID WALKER PAULETTE, 
Z AX 

Virginia. 

Baseball '13. 

This handsome young gentleman in point 
of years is one of the youngest in our 
class, but in wisdom he ranks along with 
Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. He is never 
content with asking one question on some 
trivial matter, but would rather ask a thou- 
sand. He has made rapid strides in his 
Senior year in mastering the difficult prin- 
ciples of pharmacy, and gives every indica- 
tion of becoming a star in this profession. 




i^ --^-^'^^^ ^^^-g;:^-^^^^ 






f^^^^^^^?^^^ 



94 



Cbe J=map, 1914 







CLIFFORD WALLA RAY, H 6 S 

North Carolina. 

Pharmaceutical Association, Vice-Presi- 
dent of Class '14. 

He is from the "Old North State," and 
well might that State be proud of him- He 
is the best manipulator in class as well as 
the best humored. He was never known 
to get mad but once, then only long enough 
to have a three-round bout with Smith in 
materia medica class while Prof. Lee was 
quizzing. He is a favorite with the fac- 
ulty, especially Dr. Barksdale- He has 
made us a Vice-President that will long be 
remembered. When we part he leaves a 
lasting impression upon the minds of his 
classmates. He is all in all a good fellow. 



HARRY SIMON RAMSEY, 

Virginia. 

Pharmaceutical Association. 

Harry is the original "Slow Silence." He 
very seldom speaks, but when he does there 
is generall}'" weight in what he says. We 
think that the months between September 
and June is his closed season, for he is 
never seen except at college. He honestly 
believes that the subject of organic chem- 
istry was prepared especially for his perse- 
cution. 





Ci)e I*map, 1914 



95 



fig! 




FOREST BOVVLEY SMITH, 

Oklahoma. 

Pharmaceutical Association. 

This guy is from Oklohoma as can be 
seen at a glance- He is known at every 
fruit stand in town. His motto is "friend- 
liness." His flower is "Four Roses." 

He dearly loves to debate with "Pat" 
Harloe and as a local option worker he 
can't be surpassed. It is to be regretted 
that his work is so confining that he only 
has from six until morning to devote to 
this worthy cause. He is the most popu- 
lar man in class and has the true Western 
generosity. He says he is going to China 
with Chung and when he goes he will take 
the best wishes of each and every member 
of his class. 



i 



ii 




WILLIAM RUSSELL SMITH, 

ne s 

Virginia- 
Pharmaceutical Association. 

"Willie" comes to us from the Eastern 
Shore and if he is a fair sample of the 
product, we can use lots more of them. 
Did you ever see him when he was not 
talking about that piece of "pie" ? He has 
made a "killing" with the sales ladies from 
the five and ten cent store and is real 
proud of it. 




^^f^?^^:^^^ 




96 



Ci)e I^map, 1014 




WILLIAM THOMAS ELWOOD 
SMITH, 

Virginia. 

This wise-looking sage, better known as 
"Deacon," is to all outward appearances a 
married man (we draw our conclusions 
from his sparsely covered pate) but to hear 
him talk of his numerous "flames" would 
lead one to believe that he intends to make 
his future home in Salt Lake City, Utah, 
where bigamy is no crime. As a filler of 
prescriptions, "Deacon" is the prize-taker, 
having filled twice as many as any other 
man in the Dispensary this year. 




WILLIAM EARL STROLE, 

Virginia. 

Pharmaceutical Association. 

"Babe Poison" claims Norfolk as his 
home but investigation has proven that he 
hails from that part of Virginia that is 
never disturbed by the toot of a locomo- 
tive whistle or the honk of an automobile 
horn. "Babe" has delved deeply into the 
study of bichloride of mercury and serious- 
ly asserts that three ounces of a saturated 
solution of the substance will produce toxic 
symptoms. 





- ^ -■• — " -^^ -"^^1 f 



Cfte I^Hap, 1914 



97 




JESSE ROSE WHITLEY, 

North Carolina. 

Pharmaceutical Association. 

Better known to the ladies as "Rose." 
"Whit" has been doing some reseach work 
this year and just recently discovered that 
the Bunsen Burner will not burn when the 
gas is cut off. Don't mention Paulette's 
name to "Whit" unless you are ready for 
a lively "scrap." 




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Cije I^map, 1914 




Senior pij^rmacp 

Two years ago we gathered here. 
Those years have heen of toil, of cheer. 
But yet who now would them exchange. 
With all their toils, with all their pains, 
For any other time. 

We have tried hard to do our best; 
May God in love forgive the rest. 
We all, we know, at times did wrong, 
But such is human nature's song, 
Can we be harshly blamed? 



And now that these two years are o'er, 
And we as class will meet no more. 
Let peaces, good will, to each one be 
(Let joy be unconfined) 
Our parting gift, from you from me. 

— Class Poet. 




f^'^ 



Cbe X'Mav, 1914 



Junior Class History 



:=^ 




ISTORY often repeats itself. It has been said there is no better 
way of judging the future than by the past. Although this 
aphorism is essentially applicable to the history of a State or 
nation, yet it may be said of the history of the Junior Class. 
Our uprisings and downsittings have been those of hundreds 
of medical men who have gone before. 

In the fall of 191 1 two small bands of men assembled 
at what was then known as the old Medical College of Vir- 
ginia and the University College of Medicine to enter upon the study of 
medicine. Each man saw before him the wonderful work of relieving the 
pain and suffering of the world. He pictured himself honored because of 
somte miraculous cure. Happily, a veil was drawn over the long, hard hours 
of study and the bitter disappointments, or some of them would not have had 
courage even to begin. 

For a few days we were allowed to roam aimlessly about. We were, 
indeed, as strangers in a strange land. Soon work commenced in earnest. 
Never* shall we forget the hours we wrestled with the vertebrae and the long 
bones, putting them in their anatomical position ; then, on being quizzed, 
to put them in just exactly the wrong ones! As we gradually fitted into 
this strange new world of drugs and tissues, the year quickly and pleasantly 
passed, in spite of hard work and Whitfield's quizzes. 

With the Sophomore year came classes from nine until seven. The days 
seemed to be endless. As in the year previous, anatomy was our hobby. We 
talked, walked and slept anatomy. In the spring of 1913 the much-talked-of 
consolidation of the two medical schools became a reality. The men looked 
forward to their Junior wonk with renewed interest because of the great 
changes that would come with the new regime. 

All came back to the grind again in September feeling like kings of 
finance, having gathered together enough "chink" by various and sundry 
methods to ward oft', for a while, the C. O. D.'s. After a few "Better Ac- 
quaintance" weeks, we forgot to talk of "my" school and "yours" but spoke 
of it as "ours." 



^&s^ 



^ 



Cl)e ^^Bap, 1914 



lOI 




Our class contains the usual mixture of good students, boners, several 
sports, and one "cute"(y) lover. We even have some future research workers. 
For further information ask Evans for his "Mustard Plaster Treatment of 
Stomatitis." 

Having had all illusions in regard to the size of our "knowledge bumps" 
cast aside by glimpses into the great unexplored zone of medical facts, we 
are determined to enter upon our Senior year with the purpose of getting all 
the practical training necessary to go forth to battle with the forces of disease 
and death. 

C. A. FowLKES, Historian. 



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JUNIOR CLASS 



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Cf)e r*Eap, 1914 



Junior Class Roll 



IP 



Anderson, J. B ■ ■ Virginia 

Anderson, C S Virginia 

Arbuckle, L. D ■ West Virginia 

Barnett, T. N Virginia 

Bell, B. I North Carolina 

Blackwell, R. B Virginia 

BocoCK, E. A Virginia 

Braswell, J. C • ■ North Carolina 

Brockwell, R. H Virginia 

Brugh, B. F Virginia 

Bucalo, H. D New York 

Bullock, J. H North Carolina 

Butler, L. J North Carolina 

Castillo, D. del. Cuba 

Childress, C. H Virginia 

Collier, T. R Virginia 

Courtney, C. B Virginia 

Cox, E. P Virginia 

Crumpler, L. O North Carolina 

Davis, Paul Virginia 

Davis. R. B • ■ Virginia 

Deans, W. W North Carolina 

Dixon, G. G- North Carolina 

DoGGETT. B. A Virginia 

Doles, H. M Virginia 

Emmett, J. M North Carolina 

Evans, R Indiana 

Fletcher, F. P , . ■ • • Virginia 

FoLKES, C. A '. Virginia 

Foster, J. B Virginia 

Gayle, R. F. . Virginia 

Gill, G. B Virginia 

Glover, E. T. ' Virginia 

Godwin, G. C 

Gregory, H. L ■ Virginia 

Haynes, W. R Virginia 

Hedgpeth, H. M 

Hill, P. L Virginia 

Hodes, S. M , Virginia 

HoLLENBECK, L. L New York 

HosKiNS, J. H Virginia 

Iden, C. H. . Virginia 

Irving, C. R. . .' Virginia 

Jones, B.N North Carolina 



C|)e %'Uav, 1914 



105 




JuNKiN, G. G Virginia 

Kapiloff. M New Jersey 

Karp. William Virginia 

Kellam, F. J • • Virginia 

KiLBY, E. B Virginia 

Lee, H. E • ■ Virginia 

Lee, J. M • • ■ • • North Carolina 

LiGON, J. J ■ • • • Virginia 

Martin, J. A • ■ North Carolina 

Mason. R. L • • Virginia 

Mayer. J. M • ■ ■ ■ ■ New York 

MoFFATT. B. H • • West Virginia 

Moore, B. D • • North Carolina 

Moore, M. A Virginia 

Munsey, p. J ■ Virginia 

McAnally. W. F North Carolina 

McChesney, W. W. Virginia 

McClees, J. E • ■ North Carolina 

McCuiston, C. M North Carolina 

McGuire, John Virginia 

Newman. Benj ; • New York 

Parker, C. P. North Carolina 

Peake. R. H ■ ■ ■ Virginia 

Peters, W. A ■ Virginia 

Phipps, W. M • ■ • Virginia 

Porter, J- E North Carolina 

Ransone, C. B • - • • Virginia 

Ratcliffe, E. a Virginia 

Reese, W. A. Virginia 

Rhudy, G. G • • ■ Virginia 

RiGGiNS. G. S Virginia 

Saunders, A. W Virginia 

Sease, C. I South Carolina 

ScHENCK, G. W Virginia 

ScHULLER, F. X Virginia 

Scott, W. W Virginia 

Shelburne, J. T. Virginia 

Smith, G. A West Virginia 

Smith, J. G South Carolina 

Smith, P. S Virginia 

Spencer, J. R North Carolina 

Stoneburner, R. W Virginia 

Sumrell, G. H North Carolina 

Thomas, J. G- North Carolina 

Trower, W. B Virginia 

Vaden, M. T Virginia 

Varn, W. L. Virginia 

Vaughan, J. C North Carolina 




]o6 



Ci)e X'Mav, 1914 



ViVAR, M. E ■ • • ■ • Cuba 

West, G. B ■ Virginia 

White. H. T Georgia 

Wire, B. O- ■ ■ West Virginia 

Wood, G. V Virginia 

Wood, T. M • • Virginia 

WooDARD, G. B North Carolina 

YoHANNON, J. I Persia 




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nt X'Mav, 1914 



107 



All the Doctor's Fault 

I am strictly on a diet — for the doctor made it plain 

That my stomach was rebelling at the gastronomic strain. 

Which my palate put upon it (I am prone to eat with zest 

A lot of fancy dishes which don't easily digest). 

The doctor told me sharply that I musn't eat so much, 

That I'd have to quit the rabbits and the cakes and pies and such. 

So he figured out a diet which was certain to agree 

With my broken-down condition — it was merely toast and tea. 




Yet my stomach isn't better, and I siififer just the same, 

And I think the doctor's faking — spite of all his fees and fame; 

I've been truly very faithful to his dietary wish. 

Though I've varied it a little with some steak and chops and fish, 

With some nicely-fried potatoes, and some doughnuts fresh and hot, 

And a fine old English pudding that was smoking from the pot ; 

Yet my chronic indigestion is as bad as it can be. 

And I've lost all faith in diets, such as simple toast and tea. 

In fact, I think it harmful, for last night I nearly died ! 

My pangs were something terrible — I moaned and groaned and cried ! 

I had the fiercest nightmare that a mortal ever knew ! 

Yet toast and tea were all I ate — except a clam or two, 

A link or so of sausage, and a glass or two of wine, 

A nicely roasted pigeon, and a lobster that was fine. 

Now I know the other items never yet have troubled me, 

And it couldn't be the lobster, so it must have been the tea ! 

— Charles T. Roebuck. 





.A^V^J^yi^-^S^ 



io8 



Cl)e ^^map, 1914 



A PRAYER 

for 

Doctors and Nurses 





E praise Thee, O God, for our friends, the doctors and nurses, 
who seek tlie heahng of our bodies. We bless Thee for their 
gentleness and patience, for their knowledge and skill. We 
remember the hours of our suffering when they brought 
relief, and the days of our fear and anguish at the bed- 
side of our dear ones, when they came as ministers of 
Thee. May we reward their fidelity and devotion by our 
loving gratitude, and do Thou uphold them by the satis- 
faction of well done. 

We rejoice in the tireless daring with which some are now tracking the 
great slayers of mankind by the white light of science. Grant that under 
their teaching, we may grapple with the sins that have ever dealt death to 
the race, and that we may so order the life of our communities that none may 
be doomed to an untimely death for lack of the simple gifts which Thou 
hast given in abundance. 

Make Thou our doctors the prophets and soldiers of Thy kingdom, which 
is the reign of cleanliness and self-restraint and the dominion of health and 
joyous life. 

In their whole profession, strengthen the consciousness that their calling 
is holy and they too are disciples of the Saving Christ. May they never through 
the pressure of need or ambition surrender the sense of a divine mission and 
become hirelings who serve only for money. Make them doubly faithful, in 
the service of the poor who need their help most sorely, and may the children 
of the working man be as precious to them as the children of the rich. 

Though they deal with the frail body of man, may they have an abiding 
sense o'f the eternal value of the life residing in it, and by the call of faith 
and hope they may summon to their aid the powers of Thy all-pei-vading life. 

Walter Rauchenbusch. 








Sophomore Class Roll 




Alfaro-Diaz, F Porto Rica 

Allen, CD Virginia 

Barney, Q. H ■ • West Virginia 

Barr, E. S ■ ■ • Ohio 

Belcher, A- C Virginia 

Bell, N. K Virginia 

Bender, E. L North Carolina 

Brigman, W. B South Carolina 

Boyette, W. T. North Carolina 

Burcher, a. W Virginia 

Carr, M. L • • North Carolina 

Carroll, P. M Virginia 

Clark, D. D North Carolina 

Crank, G. O * ■ • Virginia 

Daniel, H. S., Jr Virginia 

Davis, R. B North Carolina 

DoDSON, A. I Virginia 

Edwards, C. J- North Carolina 

Farmer, F. A Virginia 

FiTTs, F. M • • Virginia 

Ford, P. A West Virginia 

Freeman, J- D North Carolina 

Gaskins, V. B North Carolina 

Gilmer, W. P. • • Virginia 

Graham, C. F Virginia 

Gregory, G. P- Virginia 

Hamlin, P. G Virginia 

Hammer, J. L Virginia 

Hannah, W. N Virginia 

Harper, E. C Virginia 

Harward, p. C North Carolina 

Hester, J. R North Carolina 

Hill, L. B Ohio 

HoBGOOD, A. J. . . : . North Carolina 

HoRTON, H. M North Carolina 

HuGHSTON, G. F South Carolina 

Irwin, W. C . Tennessee 

Jennings, C. W North Carolina 

Johnson, M. A. Virginia 

Johnston, H. C Virginia 

JusTis, L. H Virginia 

Kay, W. V South Carolina 





1 1 1 1 1 imm IJ±lJX'.Jll.i ' ' 'Jl!J..lL'd;j L I iLLLLimjJii-UiJ-UJ-U.llL'J.iUl.l-LiJJJJ.ULUlUi 




m 



Ci)e X'Mav, 1914 



Lewis, S. V North Carolina 

Llewellyn, C. E • • Virginia 

Marion, T. L South Carolina 

Mercer, C. T. . . • • • • Virginia 

MiDDLEKAUF, H. G Virginia 

McAlpine, L. a • • Virginia 

Neel, J. T Virginia 

Nelson, William • Virginia 

Otey, W. M ." Virginia 

Parker, P. G North Carolina 

Parker. W. R North Carolina 

Parson, A. D Virginia 

Peery, V. P Virginia 

Phillips, Charles Virginia 

Phipps, J. C Virginia 

Poindexter, E. O Virginia 

Ransone. a. T Virginia 

Ray, R. C North Carolina 

Remine, W. H • • • Virginia 

Rhudy, B. E Virginia 

Rives, J. D • • Virginia 

Robertson, A. F Virginia 

Robertson, P. A Virginia 

RoLSTON, G. W • • Virginia 

Rucker, a. B Virginia 

Sinclair, M Virginia 

Spencer, J. J Florida 

Spencer, J. M Virginia 

Stafford, F. B Virginia 

Strickland, E. L North Carolina 

Sutherland, F- Virginia 

Tabb, J. L Virginia 

Thomas, H. B South Carolina 

Thomas, W. C North Carolina 

Tipton, J. W Virginia 

Trivette, W. a North Carolina 

Tyler, D. G Virginia 

Van Pelt, J. F .Virginia 

Vaughan, R. W Virginia 

Vivo. J. E Porto Rica 

Watkins, R. E North Carolina 

Whitehead, L. J North Carolina 

WiLKiNS, W. W • Virginia 

Williams, W. E South Carolina 

Wyatt, H. L North Carolina 

Yates, O. R North Carolina 





CI)e I^map, 1914 



:| 




iiM 



History of Sophomore Class 

"X one hand, students of M. C. V., loyal, defiant and strong; 
on the other, men of U. C. M. retaliating with equal firmness 
and vigor. 

\A'hen the session of 1913-14 opened it combined two 
classes but newly imbued with the fire of a new devotion. 
AA'as it to be expected that all would be harmonious from the 
first? Was this thought possible ? No, not even by those who 
entertained the fondest hope for such a result; and yet from 
the very first they fused into a coordinate friendship ever increasing by closer 
associations. 

Association and common inte^^ests make friendship, and friendship rounds 
us into nobler men. The ties that bind "us to our college are not merely those 
of scholarship ; and the regards we have for anatomy and chemistry are not 
the only benefits to be derived from our Alma Mater. A something, tangible, 
coherent, lies deeper than all this — friendship. We may have knowledge 
and the power that ultimately comes with it, and yet be deficient in the quali- 
ties that must make up the guardians of the lives of our fathers, mothers, 
sisters, and brothers ; but if shoulder to shoulder we go through life with a 
friend of sincere trust, we must go as though conscience was our only guide ; 
we would not, we could not, deviate from the right. Sometime in the future, 
perhaps, we will stop amidst the mad rush of life and look back upon the 
days when we were undergraduates. Then we will not remember the im- 
pressions of a certain examination, but will recall some associate, one who 
was dear to us. 

The time is not far distant when we shall have to face the firing line — 
only the fittest can survive; aim true. If we fall, let us fall like men; the 
success of our next endeavor may depend upon experience. Stand for some- 
thing high, noble true, not because society wills it, but because we know wheron 
we stand ; that we will be happier, dearer and better and the world will be 
better off for our having lived in it. Live so that our life may be a joy to 
ourselves, an ideal to others and an honor to the class of 1916; and behind 
we will leave veneration and friendship in the hearts of our fellows. 



DoRSEY G. TvLER, Historiau. ^= 




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The Southern Girl 



God took the threads of a spider's web 
And dipped them in a pool of night, 

Then gave them the wave of the summer's sea 

And the gloss of the moonbeam's softening hght- 
Thus He made her hair. 

He took the ameth^'st sky of June 

And the laughing gleam of a midnight star, 
The magical depth of His universe — 
Thus He made her eyes. 

He took thei tint of the budding rose 

And weaved into the sunset's glow, 
And He poured the color upon a cloud 

As soft and white as the drifted snow — 
Thus He made her cheek. 

He took the sigh of a gentle breeze, 

A note from a silver celestial lyre, 
The clear free tone of a wild bird's cry, 

And the sweet soft song of an angel's choir — 
Thus He made her voice. 



He took the simplicity of the dawn, 
He added the freshness of the rain; 

He gave the tenderness of Himself 
To guide men over a world of pain — 
Thus He made her soul. 




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FRESHMAN C\A&%. 




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Cf)e Idltip, 1014 




History of Freshman Class 

HEN the. Medical College of V^irginia threw open its doors on 
September i6, T913, there had assembled already a large 
number of men from all parts of our own country, and some 
few from distant lands, who had chosen to follow the pro- 
fession of medicine. 

These men, who today constitute the Freshman Medical 
Class, realizing the growing importance of Richmond, as a 
medical center, the material advantages offered both in instruc- 
tion and equipment since the amalgamation of the Medical College of \'irginia 
and the University College of Medicine, determined to avail themselves of 
the unsurpassed opportunities and begin their study of medicine in the historic 
city of Richmond. 

Although we are as yet in the embryonic stage of development in our 
chosen profession, it is hoped that each and every member of our class has 
proven by his faithfulness and attention to his duties that he is worthy to 
follow in the footsteps of Aesculapius, the patron saint of physicians. There 
has been a marked unity of feeling and good-fellowship among the members 
of our class, spiced by a wholesome rivalry which urges each one on to a 
better accomplishment of his duties and a higher perfection in his work. 

Xowhere has this spirit of good-fellowship and warm friendship revealed 
itself more clearly than in our class election. In every case the election of 
the class officers was warmly contested, and as a final result the following 
men were chosen to represent the class of 1917 in its Freshman year: L M. 
Derr, President; AV. G. Suiter, Vice-President; J. H. Royster, Secretary and 
Treasurer; C. W. Colonna, Sergeant-at-Arms ; J. M. Harwood, Historian. 

Though our class history is of a necessity short since we are Freshmen 
and have just entered the state of being, what little there is we are proud 
of, and each and every one of us deems it an honor to have our names en- 
rolled as a member of the class of 1917. We have been well represented in 
every phase of college activity — literary, social and athletic — for upon the 
"X-Ray" staff, in the Glee Club and on the football squad are found members 
of our class. 

T. M. Harwood, Historian. 






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— . — 


PL. — 

















Freshman Class Roll 

Althizee, E. R • • • • • Virginia 

Ames, E. T Virginia 

Andes, G. C Virgir.a 

Baker, R. M Virginia 

Barber, T. M • • • • • ; West Virginia 

Bear, Harry ,• Virginia 

Benthall, R. F North Carolina 

Brake, B. S • ■ • ■ • West Virginia 

Broaddus, R. G Virginia 

Brooks, H. E • • North CaroHna 

BuRRUSS, T. S. D Virginia 

Cain, J. R • • • • Virginia 

Capo, F. J., Jr Porto Rico 

Carter, T. L • • • ■ • ■ • North CaroHna 

Chenery, a. J Virginia 

Chilton, O. B -...•■ • • Virginia 

Clarke, J. E Virginia 

Coffindoffer, C. C. . . . - ■ • • • West Virginia 

Cole, D. B • '• Virginia 

CoLONNA, C. W • • ■ • ■ Virginia 

Crenshaw, J. D Virginia 

Daly, A. R. • ■ • New York 

Derr, I. M ; • Virginia 

Devine, C. J • • ■ Virginia 

Dill, G. T Virginia 

Divers, D. S Virginia 

Dudley, H. H • • • • • Virginia 

Durham, L. E Virginia 

DuvALL, T. F. • • • North CaroHna 

Fields, J. A • -Virginia 

FoLTZ, J. D. . ■ • Virginia 

Ford, C. P. S West Virginia 

Ford, J. C West Virginia 

Ford, R. J Virginia 

Fox Lawrence Ohio 

Gay, W. T Virginia 




Cfte t'May, 1914 



119 



HM 




GiLCHKiEST, B. F Conneticut 

G^L^^N^ J- S Virginia 

Granger, W. S North Carolina 

Hamilton, E. W ^est Virginia 

Harris, Campbell Vir<^inia 

Harwood, J. M Virginia 

Hatcher, CM Virginia 

Henderson, J. P North Carolina 

Heyman. Jos New York 

Hodges. Churchill North Carolina 

HoRToN, A. G ^ North Carolina 

^"^"'^s, C. R , vj^gi^i^ 

Jones, B. B. . . ir- • . 

•^ Virginia 

K=^^' H. L Virginia 

Kenny, Cleaves Virginia 

Large, H. L \r ■ ■ 

' Virginia 

Laughon, W. I. . \T- ■ ■ 
Virginia 

Lilly, A, S -ijr ,. ^ r • • 

' • . ■ West Virginia 

Long, E. V \7- ■ ■ 

' Virginia 

Mancos, Geo., Tr ^r- ■ ■ 

' ■' V irgmia 

Martin, S. A. . . . wj ^ ^r- ■ ■ 
• ■ West V irginia 

Morgan, W. A \t„,.<-i n r 

' M orth Carolina 

McClEES, E. C. . X' ^1, r- 1- 

-• ISj orth Carolina 

Nickels, S. B ,,. . . 

Virginia 

Northington, p. O Tr- ■ ■ 
Virginia 

Oppenhimer, W. T. . . \T ■ ■ 

Virginia 

Outland, C. L M *i r- ,. 

North Carolina 

Pittman, E. E \T ^.u r- r- 

North Carolina 

PORTERFIELD, H. B ,,. . . 

• V irgmia 

Ratcliff, J. M ir ■ • 

Virginia 

Rock, M. G ^r- ■ ■ 

V irginia 

Rogers, J. M ,,. . . 

■ V irginia 

RoYSTER, J. H M 4.1 r- ,. 

' ■' ■ • . • • • North Carolina 

Sale, J. J \t- ■ ■ 

Virginia 

Sanders, J. A wi ^ \t- ■ ■ 

■^ ■ • • • West Virginia 

Sanders, U w ^ ^r- ■ ■ 

W est V irginia 

SCOTT, S. D TT- . ■ 

c ., „ •• Virginia 

Serrano, J. R p , o- 

• • Porto Rico 

Shank, Aud ii- ^ ir- . . 

VV est V irgmia 

Shepp.\rd, E. F. ,.. . . 
V irginia 




Miimiiiui 



Cbe X^Eap, 1914 




Sherrick, W. R ■ • ■ ■ Maryland 

Snead, G. C • Virginia 

Stone, N. T ........-■ Virginia 

SuAREZ, Ramon • Porto Rico 

Suiter, W. G • • • ■ North Carolina 

Summers, T. O West Virginia 

SwJSEKER, B. T ' ■ -Virginia 

Taylor, J. C ■ ■ • North Carolina 

Terrell, J. F • ■ • • Virginia 

Thornhill, R. F. : • ■ ■ Virginia 

Turner, H. C • ■ Virginia 

Turner, N. H 

Vorbrink, T. M ■ • North Carolina 

Waldron, J. V ■ • -Virginia 

Weiss, Glenn • ■ • -Virginia 

Wescott, H. H • ■ -Virginia 

Whaley, H. E • ■ • -Virginia 

Wightman, J. W ■ ■ • ■ -Virginia 

Wilkinson, R. W North Carolina 

Williams, S. D ■ - - • • - -Virginia 

Wine, J. E • Virginia 

Wolfe, H. C • • • ■ North Carolina 

Wood, C. L • ■ - -' ' Connecticut 

Woodruff, F. G ■ • • ■ ■ - -North Carolina 






■ ' ^ ■■ :^ . % - V^l^ ■^ • t^ ' V --^ i^.-.- 



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Cf)e ^=map, 1914 



i|ippocratic O^atf) 



SWEAR by Apollo the Physician, by ^sculo- 
pius, by Hygeia, by Panacea, and by all the 
gods and goddesses, calling them to witness 
that, according to my ability and judgment, I 
will in every particular keep this, my oath and 
covenant: To regard him who teaches this art 
equally with my parents, to share my sub- 
stance, and if he be in need, to relieve his necessities; 
to regard his offspring equally with my brethren, and to 
teach his art, if they shall wish to learn it, without fee or 
stipulation; to impart a knowledge by precept, by lecture, 
and by every other mode of instruction to my sons, to the 
sons of my teacher, and to pupils who are bound by 
stipulation and oath, according to the law of medicine, but 
to no other. 

I will use that regimen which, according to my abili- 
ty and judgment, shall be for the welfare of the sick, and 
I will refrain from that which shall be baneful and injur- 
ious. If any shall ask of me a drug to produce death, I 
will not give it, nor will I suggest such counsel. In like 
manner I will not give to a woman a destructive pessary. 

With Purity and holiness will I watch closely my life 
and my art. I will not cut a person who is suffering from 
a stone, but will give way to those who are practitioners 
in this work. Into whatever houses I shall enter, I will 
go to aid the sick, abstaining from every voluntary act of 
injustice and corruption and from lasciviousness with 
women or men — free or slaves. 




i^-^j i^'if 





122 



Cfte I^lRap, 1914 



w 



Whatever in the life of men I shall see or hear, in my 
practice or without my practice, which should not be 
made public, this will I hold in silence, believing that such 
things should not be spoken. 

While I keep this, my oath, inviolate and unbroken, 
may it be granted to me to enjoy life and my art, forever 
honored by all men; but should I by transgression violate 
it, be mine the reverse. 

— Translated from the Greek. 





124 



Ci)e X-mav, 1914 



Junior Dental Class Roll 

Baldwin, W. W Virginia 

Blalock, J. A . ■ North Carolina 

Brown. J. W North Carolina ■ 

Caldwell, W. B West Virginia 

Campbell, T. A • • • North Carolina 

Crutchfield, J. G North Carolina 

Davidson, G. B • • Virginia 

Dudley, A. D • Virginia 

DuNFORD, F. A Virginia 

Haller, J. B Virginia 

HoAG, C. W • ■ New York 

HoGE, E. A • • Virginia 

Kent, S. D Virginia 

Keyser, E. H Virginia 

Kramer, C. S • Virginia 

Mercer, O. T 

O'Keefe, C. S Massachusetts 

Tyler, F. A Virginia 

Williams, J. B .Virginia 




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126 



Cf)e I^Kap, 1914 



Junior Dental Class History 







FTER thoughts for a profession were decided on September 
18, 1912, there met at the U. C. M. fourteen boys who ma- 
triculated in the Dental Department, while at the M. C. V. 
one matriculated, and others "in both colleges for the five-year 
course. Finding all things new and strange, the "sight-seers" 
were at once lonesome and longed to be back at "Sour Wood 
Mountain" and hear the good old bell. After a short time, 
Gray's Anatomy was established for "Law and Gospel" and 
a box of bones laid as a night "sentinel" under the bed. Being instructed and 
advised by the Seniors, the "Fresh" met to elect officers, and "Pill Roller" 
WilHams was elected President and "Dream" Hoag Vice-President. The 
class was at odds, for the atoms in "Inorganic" were hard to see, and it took 
some time for each to fully understand the other, for a few "Yanks" were 
on hand. So the "Painless Home-Sickers" did dream much of" chemistry 
and anatomy, as well as of "Sallie," after burning some midnight gas. 

(B) After relating narrow escapes and adventures of Christmas, the 
class assembled and marched with the "Sawbones" to the Dissecting Hall, 
where tobacco was called upon, while some could not stand the "pressure" 
and took the bed of ease. The harmonious vibrating chords, with much song 
(Richmond is noted for both) failed to soothe near the final exams, for the 
Freshmen were without hope ; but after a most earnest stride, the messenger 
delivered the "goods" to the "summer weed-killer," and the dawn of "Junior- 
ism" was at hand. 

(C) On September 16, 1913, there met at the U. C. M. building the same 
fourteen classmates, with one from M. C. V., where he had not been selfish 
(only holding the three offices of his class), and three from the Baltimore 
Medical College — all spealking the good word and quizzing to see who did 
the most "bushwhacking," also initiating the four newcomers and handing 
them a little friendship as a token of home. Late January gave the class 
a five-year "flop-over"; sc, after traveling the road (it's easy), a sheepskin 
he will get. 

(D) The Baltimore boys are able to produce credentials as to their 
work, having specialized in bacteriology. They didn't buy artificial teeth, but 
just carved them, having held their own; for "Southwest Bill" fully threshed 
out Sophomore medicos, and many "avenues" were learned while helping Wil- 



son at the inauguration. Tliey are consoled here, and hadn't the many con- 
\eniences and the able faculty, beautiful Richmond, friendship, pretty girls 
and churches; but some get "snake bit" and can find too many quick "cures" 
along Broad street. By consolidation the "red paint" has faded, so this 
perhaps saved the one from' M. C. V. getting whitewashed. He is some 
"soldier boy," Uncle Sam having used him as a sailor. That is why he is 
our leader, having ridden the "high waves." 

(E.) Now as big Juniors we looked down on the "rats" and gave them a 
helping hand, for experience of the year past still lingered and the memory 
of the good old year of "sweat," when troubles were "few." After "Windy" 
Dudley was elected president and "bushwhacker" Blalock vice-president, the 
class started on the road of juniorism, determined to "bone" and make good. 
Some have seen the molecules in "organic" (for the "oh" in alcohol was 
removed) and the wandering "Bugs" in Bacteriology caught and incubated. 
Others relish surgery without thoughts of moving pictures or shooting "craps" 
for a "dope" or "ham and eggs." 

(F.) Killing many days at home Xmas, staying with "Santa Claus" and 
reviewing the past, the Juniors met January 5th, in the Infirmar}' to enter 
upon the Dental Profession, the "ever smiling painless ones" not fully seeing 
the Apical Foramen didn't worry while the tender hearted ones call for help 
saying: "The nerve is alive." The class is noted for its variety of individual- 
ism as daring, bravery, sports, musicians, songsters, moonshiners, bushwhackers 
and "runners." One was so brave as to tackle the State Board before Xmas ; 
while others have made history from Richmond to Petersburg. 

(G. ) Being equipped in the most modern building. Prosthetic and Operative 
Technique is m'ade a joy, and the good old Tar Heels smile a perpetual smile, 
even if the bridge is too "weak." While the good work is on, the five new 
ones steal out and are found in the "stiff hall" where they gazed much at 
nerves and arteries, having taken a "subject" for a "patient" in that department, 
and losing much time as inspectors along Broad Street, Murphy's and the 
"movies," and while away the instruments will take life and "crawl off." 

(H.) The class rejoices over the amalgamation which must prove a 
success; it is further pleased and strengthened by the repeal of the five year 
course; but the Enabling Act has the "snake bitten bunch" howling, for they 
like to see "two in one." 

(I.) Now with much oil and some "gas" we hope to kill a "10" on the 
finals, and that would make all Seniors. It is said "that the class is the best 
yet, so it is hoped, after being scattered in many States, there will gather on 
our return around the old camp fire the familiar "nineteen." 

G. B. Davidson, Historian. 



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Ci)e I^Eap, 1914 




M\ 



Hope 



'm 



O Love Divine ! 
Make me of that undying love, that [ 
May give to her a life that shall not die. 
I who have dared to breathe her name must be, 
First of all, worthy to be a part of thee. 



Make me as pure as azure skies. 
That when I look in her blue eyes 
Shall bow my soul t'worship and adore 
Her divine virgin beauty, more and more. 

Make me as pure as thee, that I may rest 
With dreaming fragrance on her lilied breast. 
And as chaste as tiptoed dawn, that my 
Soul shall holily wed to her virginity. 



Make me forget the world and all 
Through all the days till my recall, 
That I may see in my love's face 
A part of thee, so full of grace. 
O Love Divine ! 

— J. L YOHANNON. 



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130 



Cl)e J^Hap, 1914 



Freshman Dental Roll 

Alexander, J. A ■ ■ North Carolina 

Ballou, N. T • . • ■ Virginia 

Barr R. F North Carolina 

Barnes, V. M • • North Carolina 

Bingham, L. R • • North CaroHna 

EwELL, B. L • • ■ ■ • .Virginia 

Gates, E. G • • ■ • -Virginia 

Jones, B. P • Virginia 

Lindberg, C. G •■■•■• New York 

MoRELL, P. A • • • ■ ■ Porto Rico 

Neff, J. S ■ • • • .Virginia 

Rangeley, C. H • ■ • Virginia 

Santori, J. P ...Porto Rico 

Wood, G. B., Jr ' Virginia 

Yates, G. N • ■ • North Carolina 



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132 



Cfte I'Eap, 1914 




Freshman Dental Class History 

L'RING the second week of September, last, there appeared 
on the scene at the Medical College of Virginia sixteen am- 
bitious young men for the purpose of studying Dentistry. 
This, according to official report, was the largest Freshman 
Dental class during the entire history of the Institution. 

The first week or two we were exceedingly busy. Several 
things had to be done. We had to learn how to get from 
our room to the college, how to find our way over the im- 
mense college building, and last but not least how to walk up and down Broad 
Street without being the center of attraction. This last problem was a difficult 
one, for be it known that some of our class hails from the country where tall 
buildings, street cars, and automobiles are things heard of but not seen. 

Now that the preliminaries were over, we began to attend classes. 
Here we learned the names of all the fellows. Very soon class spirit gleamed 
forth and each man was a friend to all the others. 

At first we got along with our work very nicely and some of the men 
even declared that Dentistry was a "cinch." Finally one afternoon after a 
lapse of about four weeks one Dr. Jefifreys met us on Prosthetic Technics. 
Here our trouble began ; however, that very afternoon he won the admiration 
of the whole class, for he called each of us "Doc." After calling the roll and 
inspecting our instruments he spoke thusly : "Boys this afternoon I want you 
to take a plaster impression of your upper jaw." Well, every man in the 
class has worked as much as ten hours each week in the laboratory since that 
day and I swear some of the men haven't finished the first requirement yet. 
That afternoon all of us had some awful experiences. Some of the men let 
the plaster get so hard that it had to be cut from their mouths, while others 
used entirely too much plaster and the excess fell into their pharynx. Plaster 
not being palatable caused nausea followed by regurgitation. AMien the 
period was up each of us looked as if we were laborers in a flour factory and 
each of us went away with sore mouths and loose teeth. 

The next thing that happened of importance was the installation of 
officers. In spite of the eloquent speeches and the hot politics of some of 
our class the outcome of the election was never in doubt. Through dire respect 
and courtesy for the aged, the majority of our class voted for N. Talley Ballou. 



imiH|l'IJJJJ-UlLLU-L'J-UL' 





Ci)e I^IRap, 1914 



^33 



for president. For the names of other officers I refer you to the class roll. 

About this time much to our sorrow, one of our men, Mr. Hahn withdrew 
from the class. 

As the weeks passed our work got harder. Nearly every man failed on 
Mr. Rudd's first Chemistry quiz . Dr. Christian announced that he was ready 
to have the practical on bones. All these troubles and the thoughts of having 
to dissect in a short while came near making some of us give up in despair, but 
we held on. 

Finally the time came when we had to dissect. Not a man in the class 
will ever forget the good old days we have spent together in Dr. Broadnax's 
office dissecting. The dissecting hall is the favorite "hanging out" place for 
the class. 

One afternoon our instructor was demonstrating the Sterno-Cleido-Mas- 
toid Muscle, and said that a certain stroke in fencing was a wonderful 
developer of this muscle. The doctor, being a fencer himself, asked our 
Bingham if he fenced. It is evident that Bingham was either asleep on the 
job or he had never heard of fencing, for he spoke thusly: "Yes Doctor, I 
helped my Grandfather fence in a hog pasture once." 





__^^^^^^^ 




Hliil^llil!llii!lili^limi!!ll!li 




134 



mt I^iaap, 1914 



A Modern Soloman 



(i) My son, there is a heaviness about mj' heart too grievous to be lifted by the 
strains of music. 

(2) My brain burneth with the image of a coy woman on the shady side of fifty, 
and fat withal. 

(3) And she is my wife. 

(4) The sheen of pink pearls is on her finger nails ; the blush of the rose doth 
mantle her cheek; the cherry lieth on her lip; her coiffure is builded with raven tresses 
from Cathay; her person is redolent of all the perfumes of Samarkand and Araby. 

(5) But her eyes are as the stars of noon; they twinkle not. 

(6) Beauty weepeth and turnethaway her face. 

(7) Youth is outraged and will not be comforted. 

(8) Cosmetics adorn her without, but Rheumatism and Sciatica reign within; for 
she is young no more, save in her mind. 

(9) Her feet are reluctant in the dance, yet she urgeth them on to folly. 

(10) For lo ! she placeth her' foot on the polished floor and glideth, yea, slideth with 
all the grace of a Hippo that treadeth on bananas. 

(11) The world laugheth, and he that laugheth not is her husband. 

(12) But in her own eyes she is sweet. 

(13) Verily, 'tis the sweetness of sugar on oysters; the stomach revolteth thereat. 

(14) My son, forgive the tears of an old man; I was once as thou until I embarked 
on the Courtship that carried me into the sea of Matrimony. 

(15) Behold me now; I am the work of woman, the great magician that turneth 
into a Lobster the Wise Guy. 

(16) For lo ! I have taken the thirty-third degree; hearken unto the ritual, the com- 
mandments of a wife : 

(17) Thou shalt be strong; yet shall a woman twine thee about her finger. 

(18) Thou shalt be wise; yet must thou agree with a woman and find wisdom in 
her logic. 

(19) Thou shalt be dignified; yet must thy feet follow in the dances of the fatuous. 

(20) Thou shalt be rich ; yet must thou not call a single shekel thine own, and thy 
lunch money shall be doled out to thee. 

(21) Thou shalt worship me; for I am the wife of thy youth; and a jealous wife; 
thou shalt have no other woman before thee. 

(22) Verily, my son, let thy motto be for all women : Get Thee Behind Me. 

(23) And when thou goeth among maidens consider them all ; but be thou as a 
woman that shoppeth all day, yet buyeth not. 

— Selected. 




L 







Junior Pharmacy 



^36 



mt J^Hap, 1914 







1 


ill 



Junior Pharmacy Class Roll 

Bonds, W. E ' • • Virginia 

Booth, Roy • • ■ Virginia 

Brown, B. B • • Virginia 

Cole, W. E • • • Virginia 

Davenport, J. G ■ ■ • Virginia 

Earles, G. W • • • Virginia 

Ellington, G. R. . . : North Carolina 

FisHBURNE, R. T Virginia 

Fray, J. H • • Virginia 

Friddle, a. E West Virginia 

Hale, B. C • • West Virginia 

Hausenflook, S. a • Virginia 

Henderson, D. B • • ■ Virginia 

Henley, L.J Virginia 

HisEY, H. C : Virginia 

Hill, T. C. • • ■ ■ • North Carolina 

Hopkins. W .B Virginia 

Hoover, W. H Virginia 

Kritzer, E. L North Carolina 

Earner, Frank Illinois 

Lewter, J. O Virginia 

Moseley, R. T ■ ■ Virginia 

Murrah, Tom m IE South Carolina 

MuRRiLL, J. K , North Carolina 

Quillen, J. W Virginia 

Saunders, Irving ■ • • Virginia 

Shirkey, H. G Virginia 

Sisson, V. E Virginia 

Thomas, F. W Virginia 

Turner, L. W. ■ Virginia 

Van Pelt, W. T Virginia 

Young, T. L North Carolina 

Zirkle, H. W Virginia 

SPECIAL 

Callis, R. M North Carolina 

Patterson, J. A Virginia 

Sutton, J. L North Carolina 



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138 



Cf)e I^map, 1914 



Jil 





History of Junior Pharmacy Class 

CTuBER the ist, 1913, ushered into the M. C. V. forty-three 
students to take up their work in the Junior Pharmacy class. 
N^LjpffKU yj ^" ^'^^ early part of the year the Medical College of 

n y\~\\Kia'/? AyJi \'irginia and the University College of Medicine consolidated, 
and naturally the Department of Pharmacy has been strength- 
ened and enlarged. 

The Junior class is the largest ever enrolled, there being 
on class roll at present thirty-five, seven having left on ac- 
count of sickness and other reasons, while one member, Mr. M. Watson died in 
the early part of the session. 

Early in the session we met together, organized and elected officers, and 
ever since have pulled together for the best interests of the class. 

Though work has not monopolized all of our interests, for sometimes we 
have laid books on the shelves unstudied to fulfill a social engagement or to 
attend a picture show, knowing full well that on the following day that we 
would be the victims of sarcastic remarks from Mr. Rudd or that Mr. Bolen- 
baugh would not look pleased when we shook our heads at his interrogations. 

In the Pharmaceutical Association, of which about three-fourths of the 
class are members, we have taken an active part in all meetings. Owing to 
the association meeting only twice a month, it is not possible for each member to 
perform duty but once during his Junior year ; but the members have attended 
regurlarly, even though not on the program, and the keenest interest has been 
shown in every meeting. 

\\'e also come in for a share of the honors in athletics, one of our mem- 
bers making a splendid showing on the Varsity Basket Ball team. 

The class relations on the whole have always been of a most pleasant 
and loyal character and we feel ourselves fortunate in being members of the 
class of 191 5. 

We hope to see next year the largest graduating class from the Pharmacy 
Department that has ever gone out from the institution, and feel sure that 
its members will reflect credit, not only upon themselves, but upon their College 
also. 

Historian. 





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Cfte J^map, 1914 



139 



A Century's Progress in Medicine 

HE wonderful progress in Medicine during the past century lias 
been largely due to our improved knowledge of the causes and 
manifestations of disease. This knowledge, due to means 
and methods then unknown, was impossible a hundred years 
ago. Not only have we adopted radically different methods 
of studying and handling disease, but our very conception of 
disease itself has changed. 

The old physician, lacking a true knowledge of the nature 
of disease, and unable to perceive its manifold character, was forced to build 
up "Systems," as that of Brown, which attempted to classify all diseases as 
sthenic or asthenic, and therefore to be treated with depressants or stimulants. 
Of the causes of disease very little was known. There was a disposition to 
ascribe disease to some lack of balance in the body, a position very evidently 
influenced by Calen's doctrine of the Four Humours. This view, while true 
enough, explained nothing. 

It was not until Metchnikoff began his studies in the pathology of the 
cell and Davaine demonstrated the relation of bacterial axtivity to morbid 
conditions that the? physician could altogether throw aside the "Systems" and 
treat each separate disease as an entity. 

Through bacteriology we have gained a vastly increased knowledge of the 
causes of disease and of the best methods of attack. The study of Bacteriology, 
beginning as long ago as 1683 with the discovery by Leeuwenhoek of micro- 
scopic organisms in the mouth, did not arrive at the status of a scientific study 
until Ehrenberg published his treatise "Infusionstierchen" in 1838, and it was 
not until Pasteur in 1854 showed something of the relation of bacteria to man 
that any practical value could be attached to this science. Lister, inspired by 
the startling discoveries of Pasteur, suspected that these organisms might be 
connected with the frightful amount of sepsis associated with hospital work 
in those days. 

Modern surgery really dates from his insistence upon aseptic conditions. 
While even in the Middle Ages and as far back as classic times there were 
surgeons capable of the most delicate work, internal and even cosmetic opera- 
tions such as the replacement of a nose, cut off perhaps for some political 
offense; yet the frequent sepsis, producing a condition much worse than that 
whose remedy was attempted, made surgery a risk not to be undertaken except 





^^^^^^r^^^^ 




140 



Cf)e I^map, 1914 



in the gravest conditions. Now the risk of infection is so small that it can 
practically be discounted altogether. 

Another profound change in surgery was due to the use of anaesthesia, 
introduced somewhat earlier. Like many other discoveries of those wonderful 
mystery-exploring early years of the nineteenth century, several investigators, 
working independently, came upon this new thing almost at the same time. 
It was simply that the march of progress, and the discovery of the need of the 
new thing, made its appearance inevitable. 

Probably the first anaesthetic used was nitrous oxide, "laughing gas." 
Afterward chloroform was found to be safer and more convenient ; and later 
this was, for most operations, superseded by ether. At the present time certain 
qualities and improved methods of administration of nitrous oxide have made 
this again the favorite with some surgeons. Lately we have had the intro- 
duction of orange ether to remove certain unpleasant effects of anesthesia. 
Further development has led to the method of intraspinous anaesthesia by the 
use of stovaine or novocaine in those cases, such as operations upon the face, 
in which general anaesthesia is impossible or unsatisfactory. 

Thus surgery, relieved of much of its pain and danger, has made rapid 
advances. Old operations have been improved and new ones admitted. Anaes- 
thesia permits of a certain deliberate carefulness and thoroughness impossible 
at a time when the only relief for pain had been the merciful numbness of shock. 

After the method had been used some years it was found that the speedier 
surgeon had the lesser mortality, owing to less depression from the anaesthesia 
and to less traumatic shock. So now the object is the greatest speed com- 
mensurate with a successful procedure. 

In the etiology and therapeutics of disease, and in preventive medicine, 
Bacteriology has wrought perhaps an even greater change than in surgery. In 
1876 Robert Koch, by complete isolation, reinoculation, and a more under- 
standing study of the characteristics of the germ, proved a certain rod shaped 
bacillus tO' be solely responsible for anthrax. The cause being known, a suc- 
cessful method of combat was evolved, as has been uniformly the case with 
the long list of pathogenic bacteria whose relation to various diseases has 
been since demonstrated. 

At first these new remedies were the product, directly or indirectly, of 
the activity of the bacterium itself. With some bacteria, however, nothing 
could be accomplished by such means. Ehrlich, developing his receptor theory, 
and noting the selective action of certain dyes upon tissues, began, in a scien- 
tific, thorough way to seek for some chemical which would behave in just the 
same way toward bacteria as do antitoxins. His product, salvarsan, and his 








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Cfte I'Hap, 1914 



- Jii 

141 n=^= 'i 



later product, neosalvarsan, while not fulfilling the extravagant expectations 
their first publication aroused, have a definite place in the physician's armamen- 
tarium, along with mercury and the iodides. 

In preventive medicine real progress has been made. Owing to the 
heroic sacrifice of Lazear and the bold acceptance of danger by those who com- 
pleted his work, the relation of the mosquito to the yellow fever, once the 
cause of such frightful epidemics in the United States, has been demonstrated ; 
and we need never fear another outbreak. 

Other diseases — malaria, smallpox, hydrophobia, hookworm — could be 
quickly wiped out under proper sanitary measures, but sanitation is very diffi- 
cult of enforcement. 

Diagnosis, as at present practised, is almost entirely a product of the past 
century. Modern developments — percussion, auscultation, the clinical ther- 
mometer, the sphygmomanometer, the Xray, all give a wide range on which to 
base conclusions. Infectious diseases are identified by the microscopic and by 
serum reactions. The latter have been so developed as to differentiate con- 
clusively pregnancy or the presence of a tumor. 

In therapeutics the antitoxins and vaccines have worked great changes. 
The Xray and radium have a usefulness that holds promise for the future. 
Man's invasion of unwnown lands has introduced many new drugs, and 
careful test of the physiological action of all drugs has led to a greater pre- 
cision in their use. The physician has gained something even from the charla- 
tan and the quack. The success of Christian Science and other appeals to the 
credulous, has called attention to the power of the psychic element in healing. 

In all it has been a wonderful age and the end is not yet. Possessing as 
we do, knowledge hitherto withheld, we no longer fight blindly. But into the 
future we cannot see. What lines development shall follow, we can only 
guess. But we are facing great possibilities. The work of Ehrlich in chemo- 
therapy and of Carrel in tissue transplanting are suggestive of great future 
progress. The use of radium is only in its beginning. Metchnikoff's sug- 
gestions for staying the ravages of age offer a promising Hne of advance. 

A. T. Ransone^ "16." 

(Prize winning essay.) 




f^^^^^:^^^^^^^ 





Senior Nurses' Roll 

Virginia Lola Henkle, President Virginia 

Inez Alexander, Secretarv Virginia 

o 
Effie Brace Riggs West Virginia 

Lucy Oliver Virginia 

Elizabeth Wyllie Allen Virginia 

Ruby Virginia Parrish Virginia 

Nora Spencer Hamner Virginia 

Mary Thomas Brand Virginia 

Mary Lillian Hudgins West Virginia 

Roberta Walker Flanagan Virginia 

Jessie Roberta MacLean North Carolina 

Martha Boude Fletcher Virginia 

Eugenia Doyle Virginia 

Claudia Lucille Moore Virginia 

Everlyn Elizabeth Cook Georgia 

Virginia Lee Mullins Virginia 

IsABELL Maria Schofield -. Virginia 

Sal-lie Lee Coleman ' Virginia 

Annie Rooney Cropper Virginia 

Lillian Florence Anderson Virginia 

Josephine Copenhaver Virginia 

Cora Ella Beam North Carolina 

Marie Catherine Daly Virginia 

Olivia Montague Driscoll Virginia 




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J 44 



Cfte I^IRap, 1914 



Ode to a Skeleton 

IFouud piiiucd to a skeleton in Westniinster Abbey.] 
"Behold this ruin ! 'Tis a skull, 
Once with the ethereal spirit full. 
This narrow cell was life's retreat; 
This space was thought's mysterious seat. 
What beauteous visions filled this spot ! 
What dreams of pleasure long forgot ! 
Nor hope, nor joy, nor love, nor fear, 
Have left one trace of record here. 



"Beneath this mouldering canopy 
Once shone the lustrous, eager eye. 
But start not at that dismal void 
If social love that eye employed, 
If with no lawless fire it gleamed, 
But through the dews of kindness beamed. 
That eye forever shall be bright 
When stars and sun are sunk in night. 

'Within this silent cavern hung 

The ready, swift, and tuneful tongue. 

If falsehood's honey it disdained, 

And when it could not praise, was chained ; 
If bold in Virtue's cause it spoke, 
Yet never gentle concord broke, 

That silent tongue shall plead for thee. 

When time unveils eternity. 




''Say, did these fingers delve the mine, 
Or with the envied rubies shine? 

To hew the rock or wear the gem 

Can little now avail to them. 
But if the page of truth they sought. 
And comfort to the mourning brought. 

These hands a richer mead shall claim 

Than he who waits on wealth or fame. 

'What matters whether bare or shod 
These feet the path of duty trodV 
If from the bowers of ease they fled 
To seek affliction's humble bed ; 
If grandeur's guilty bribe they spurned 
And home to virtue's cot returned, 
These feet with angel's wings shall vie 
And tread the palace of the sky." 



— — i 



^^^x^^^^^^ 





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r-^g^.^'tg^^e^-ss^p^s-s.^ ^ 



146 



Cfte I*iaap, 1914 



ifraternitp 



at 31 coulb iorite one little toort 

M-pon tfje ijcartji of men, 
31'b bip into tfje fount of lobe 

Hnb torite toitlj golben pen 
d^ne little toorb, anb onlp one, 

Hnb feel m p toorfe on eartlj toell bone, 
W\)tn efaerp teart sjpofee liacfe to me 

Cfjat one gtoeet toorb, iFraternitp. 



'^^^^ 



Cfte J'Hap, 1914 



147 



Pi Mu 

Founded at University of Virginia, Eighteen Hundred and Ninety-Two. 
Beta Chapter established at University College of Medicine, 1893. 
Gamma Chapter estabHshed at Medical College of Virginia, 1896. 
Colors : Crimson and Gold. 
Flower : Crimson Carnation. 

CHAPTERS 

Alpha University of Virginia 

Beta-Gamma Medical College of Virginia 

Delta Epsilon University of Louisville (Louisville, Ky.) 

Theta • Jefferson Medical College 

Kappa • • • • • University of Tennessee 

Lambda Vanderbilt University 

Mu •...-. • ■ . . .Johns Hopkins University 

Nu Columbia University (P. & S.) 



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Ci)e I^Eap, 1914 




ACTIVE MEMBERS PI MU, 1913-1914 



Seniors 



Barber. T. L. 
Byrd, G. B. 
Fitts, J. B. 
Fowlkes, W. B. 



Goodwin, E. LeB. 
Hill, D. H. 
Meares, B. N. 
Martin, J W. 



Parramore, J. O. 
Rudasill, C. L. 
Sinton, A. C, Jr. 



Braswell, J. C. 
Emmett, J. M. 
Foster, J. B. 



Juniors 

Gregory, H. L. 
Kellam, F. 
Peake. R. H. 



Scott, W. W. 
Wood, T. M. 
Trower, W B. 



'M i^ 



Burcher, A. W. 
Dudley, H. H. 
Fitts, F. M. 



Barber, T. M. 
Chenery, A. J. 
Cole, D. B. 



Sophomores 

Justis, L. H. 
Mercer, C. B. 
Phillips, C. 
Tipton, J. W. 

Fresh jfEN 

Colonna, C. W. 
Scott, s: D. 
Suiter, W. G. 
Westcott, H. H. 



Tyler, D. G. 
Vaughan, R. W. 
Watkins, R. E. 



VVhaley, H. E. 
Gilman, S. 
Ames, E. T. 



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Cfte %'Mav, 1014 




J 



Beta-Gamma Chapter, Pi Mu Fraternity 



Anderson, Paul V. 
Baker, Harry B. 
Bassett, H. \V. 
Gary, S. B. 
Gorsline, Isaac T. 
Hobson, E. L. 



Blanton, C. A. 
Bright, J. Fulmer 
Christian, W. G. 
Gray, Alfred L. 
McGavock, E. P. 
McGuire, Stuart 
Newton, McGuire 
Shepherd, W." A. 
Tucker, Beverly R. 
Upshur, Francis W. 
White, Joseph A. 
Baughman, Greer 
Bowen, S. C. 
Brown, A. G. Jr. 



FRATRES IN URBE 

Hundley, G. T. 
Lee, F. H. 
Lorraine, W. B. 
McGowan, W. A. 
Michaux, Jacob 
Moseley, E. J. Jr. 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Grinnan, St. George T. 
Hopkins, E. Guy 
Willis, A. Murat 
Peple, W. Lowndes 
Williams Ennion G. 
Bosher, R. S. Jr. 
Harris, W. T. 
Mann, Herbert 
Nelson J. Garnett 
Michaux Stuart N. 
Wiggs, L. B. 
Willis, B. C. 
Blackwell, Karl S. 
Hoge, M. D. 



Reade, F. M. 
Redwood, F. H. 
Rex, J P. 
Talbott, R. S. 
Talbott, E. B. 
Weisiger, W. R. 



Craig, W. H. 
Broaddus, T. N. 
Brunk, O. C. 
Earnhardt, J. M. 
Ennett, N. Thomas 
Graham, W. T. 
Howie, Paul W. 
Johns, F. S. 
Marsteller, A. A. 
Mercer, C. W. 
Price, Lawrence T. 
Mason, H. Norton 
Rucker, M. Pierce 




Cfte %'Mav, 1914 



151 



Kappa Psi 



Beta Chapter founded U. C. M., 189J 
Founded Columbia University. 1879. 

FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 






Dalton, H. A. 
Caldwell, M. B. 
Bynum, C. M. 
Cata, E. G. 
Bowman, E. L. 



Shelburne, J. T. 
Smith, J. G. 
Childress, C. H. 
Vivar, M. E. 



Rhudy, B. E. 
Rives, J. D. 



Sanders, J. A. 
Sanders, U. O. 
Fox, L. P. 



Seniors. 

Walton. L. E. 
Corns, E. M. 
Willis, C. G. 
Perry, S. B. 



Juniors. 

Thomas, J. G. 
Cox, E. P. 
Moffat, B. H. 
Reese, W, A. 

Sophomores. 

Parson, A. D. 
Dodson, A. I. 

Freshmen. 

Wolfe, H. E. 
Lilly, A. E. S. 
Woodruff, F. G. 



Putnev, L. L 
Ozlin, R. L. 
Wilhoit, S. E. 
Walkup, H. A. 



Davis, R. B. 
Barnette, F. N. 
Spencer. J. R.. 



Barney, O. H. 



Thornhill, R F. 
Large, H. L. 



jyjj - ^^k " -^ - 




152 



Ci)e J'Kap, 1914 




FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

John W. Brodnax, M. D., Ph. G. Bosher W. Miller, M. D., Ph. G. 

John Dunn, M. A., M. D. H. Stuart McLean, M. D. 

William W. Dunn, M D. Virginius Hairison, A. M., M. D. 

J. O Fitzgerald, M. D. 




154 



Cf)e I^iaap, 1914 



Chapters 



Alpha Grand Council, Wilmington, Delaware. 
COLLEGIATE CHAPTERS 



Beta Medical College of Virginia (Richmond, Va. 

Gamma Columbia University (New York, N. Y. 

Delta University of Maryland ( Baltimore, Md. 

Zeta • Georgetown University (Washington. D. C. 

Eta Philadelphia College of Pharmacy ( Philadelphia, Pa. 

Iota • ■ ■ University of Alabama (Mobile, Ala. 

Kappa Birmingham Medical College and Graduate School, University of Alabam 

(Birmingham, Ala.) 

Lambela • • Vanderbilt University (Nashville, Tenn. 

Mu .Massachusetts College of Pharmacy (Boston, Mass. 

Nu Medical College of South Carolina ( Charleston, S. C. 

Xi University of West Virginia (Morgantown, W. Va. 

Pi ■...■■ Tulane University ( New Orleans, La. 

Rho Atlanta Medical College (Atlanta, Ga. 

Sigma • P. & S. (Baltimore, Md. 

Upsilon Louisville College of Pharmacy (Louisville, Ky. 

Phi Northwestern University ( Chicago, 111. 

Chi ■ University of Illinois (Chicago, 111. 

Psi Baylor University (Dallas, Tex. 

Omega Southern Methodist University (Dallas, Tex. 

Beta-Beta ■ • • Western Reserve University (Cleveland, O. 

Beta-Gamma University of California (San Francisco, Cal. 

Beta-Delta • • Union University (Albany, N. Y. 

Beta-Epsilon Rhode Island College of P. & S. (Providence, R. I. 

Beta-Zeta Oregon University (Cowallis, Ore. 

Beta- Eta ••....■. .Jefferson Medical College (Philadelphia, Pa. 

Beta-Theta University of Tennessee (Memphis, Tenn. 

Beta-Iota North Pacific College of Medicine ( Portland, Ore. 

Beta-Kappa University of Pittsburgh ( Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Beta-Xi Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, Md. 

Delta-Delta University of Pennsylvania ( Philadelphia, Pa. 

Beta Mu University of Louisville (Louisville, Ky. 

Phi Rho Medical Department of Cornell (New York, N. Y. 

Epsilon-Xi Harvard (Cambridge, Mass. 



Cf)e I^Eap, 1914 



155 



Phi Beta Pi 

Colors: Green and JVhite. 
Flower: White Carnation. 
Founded 1891. 

Phi Psi Chapter mstalled igoi. 

CHAPTERS 

Eastern Province 

Alpha University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 

Zeta • ■ Baltimore College of Physicians and Surgeons (Baltimore, Md.) 

Eta • Jefferson Medical College (Philadelphia, Pa.) 

Omicron Indiana University School of Medicine (Indianapolis, Ind. ) 

Phi Psi • ■ Medical College of Virginia (Richmond, Va.) 

Chi • ■ Georgetown University (Washington, D. C.) 

Alpha Gamma • Syracuse University (Syracuse, N. Y.) 

Alpha Delta • ■ Medico-Chirurgical College ( Philadelphia, Pa.) 

Alpha Zeta Indiana University School of Medicine (Bloomington, Ind.) 

Alpha Eta • • University of Virginia (Charlottesville, Va.) 

Alpha Xi • • • Harvard University (Boston, Mass.) 

Alpha Omicron Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, Md.) 

Southern Province 

Rho Medical Department, Vanderbilt University (Nashville, Tenn.) 

Sio-ma University of Alabama (Mobile, Ala.) 

Alpha Beta • ■ Tulane University (New Orleans, La.) 

Alpha Kappa • • University of Texas (Galveston, Tex.) 

Alpha Lamboa University of Oklahoma (Norman, Okla.) 

Alpha Mu • • University of Louisville (Louisville, Ky.J 




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Cbe K^map, 1914 




Northern Province 

Beta • • ■ University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, Mich.) 

Delta Rush Medical College (Chicago, 111.) 

Theta Northwestern University Medical School (Chicago, 111.) 

Iota . . , ■ . . . College of P. & S., University of Illinois (Chicago, 111.) 

Kappa • ■ • • Detroit College of Medicine (Detroit, Mich.) 

Chi University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, Minn.) 

Pi ■ ■ University of Iowa (Iowa City, Iowa) 

Alpha Alpha John A. Creighton University (Omaha, Neb.) 

Alpha Epsilon Marquette University (Milwaukee, Wis.) 

Western Province 

Lambda ■ St. Louis University (St. Louis, Mo.) 

Mu Washington University (St. Louis, Mo.) 

Nu University Medical College (Kansas City, Mo.) 

Tau University of Missouri (Columbia, Mo.) 

Omega • ■ . . . .Leland Stanford, Jr., University (San Francisco, Cal.) 

Alpha Iota University of Kansas (Lawrence, Kan.) 

Alpha Nu University of Utah (Salt Lake City, Utah) 




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Cfie I*Eap, 1914 



Phi Psi Chapter Roll 




Cozart, W. S. Jr. 
Urbach, Howard 
Norfleet, E. P. 



Bugh, B. F. 
Bullock, J. H. 
Collier, Tom 
Davis, Paul 



Johnson, M. A. 
Jennings, C. W. Jr. 
Goodwin, A J. Jr. 



Wood, C. L. 
Durham, L. E. 



Seniors. 

Parrish, J 
Putney, R. H. 
Stoneburner, L. T. 

Juniors. 

Iden. C. H. 
Mason, R. L. 
Moore, M. A. 
Phipps, W. M. 

Sophomores. 

Purkes, Ambrose 
Hill, L B. 



Freshmen. 
Ford, R. J. 



Garrett, T. F. 
Glass, R. E. 



Schenk, G. W. 
Stoneburner, R. W. 
Wire, B. O. 
Yarn, W. S. 



Thomas, H. B. 
McAlpine, L. A. 



Turner, N. H. 



^-^f^r?^t?>;>-r^-?S*?'^>-, '■ - 



Cf)e I^map, 1914 



159 



Phi Chi 



Founded 1887 at University of \'ermont. 
Theta-Eta Chapter installed 1900. 

Colors : Green and White. 
Flower: White Carnation. 

CHAPTERS 




Alpha Medical Department of University of Vermont 

Zeta • Medical Department of University of Texas 

Theta-Eta Medical College of Virginia 

Iota ■ • Medical Department of University of Alabama 

Lambda Medical Department of University of Western Pennsylvania 

Mu Medical College of Indiana (Indianapolis) 

Nu Birmingham Medical College (Alabama) 

Omicron • ■ Medical Department of Tulane University 

Xi ■ University of Fort Worth (Texas) 

Pi Starling Ohio Medical University (Columbus, O.) 

Rho • Chicago University 

Sigma Atlanta College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Tau ■ • • • University of South Carolina 

Upsilon • Atlanta Medical College 

Phi Medical Department of George Washington University 

Chi Jefferson Medical College 

Psi University of Michigan 

Alpha-Alpha • Medical Department of University of Louisville 

Alpha-Theta Ohio Wesleyan 

Beta-Beta • • Baltimore Medical College 

Gamma-Gamma ■ • • Medical College of Maine 

Delta-Delta • ■ College of Physicians and Surgeons of Baltimore 




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i6o 



Cf)e I*Eap, 1914 



Theta-Theta ■ Maryland Medical College 

Kappa • ■ Medical Department of Georgetown University 

Pi Sigma ••.... University of Maryland 

Sigma-Theta Medical Department of University of North Carolina 

Sigma Nu Chi Chattanooga Medical College (Tennessee) 

Siomu Mu Chi Alumni Association ( Chattanooga) 

Phi Sigma • ■•.•-.. Chicago College of Medicine and Surgery 

Chi-Tliela Medico-Chirurgical College of Philadelphia 

Kappa-Psi College of Physicians and Surgeons of St. Louis 

Pi Delta Cm • • • University of California 

Kappa-ueua Johns Hopkins University 




FRATRES IN FACULTATE 






Blair, J. R. 
Mercer, W. F. 
Rosebro, B. M. 
Henson, J. W. 
Johnston, Geo. 
Taylor, H. M. 



Winn, J. 1'". 
Hutchison, J. M. 
Jones, W. R. 
Nuckols, M. E. 
Fitzgerald, R. S. 
Gray, B. H. 



Lord, F. K. 
Williamson, W. 
Stryker, R. P. 
Martin, D. D. 
Mason, W. L. 



F. 





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162 



i^ 



Clje I^Hap, 1914 



Active Members of Phi Chi Fraternity 



Carter, H. G. 
Denit, G. B. 
Downing, Sam 
Dudley, W B. 



Gayle, R. F. Jr. 
Irving, C. R. 
Junkin, G. G. 



Ford, P. A. 
Gregory, G. P. 



Seniors. 

Hardy, T G. 
Henkle, H. S. 
Hutton, F. B. Jr. 
Laird, W. R. Jr. 

Juniors. 

Jones, B. N. 
Hoskins, J. H. 



Sophomores. 

Otey, W. M. 
Strickland, E. L 

Freshmen. 



Neblett, H. B. 
Stuart, R. R. 
Tyler, G. B. 
Wiatt, R. G. 



Hobgood, A. J. 
\'aden, M. T. 



Tabb, J. L. 




Derr, 1. M. 
Jones, B. B. 



Royster, J. M. 
Stump, C. E. 



W'ightman, J. H. 




nt i*iaap, 1914 



163 J^ 



Omega Upsilon Phi 

Founded at University of Buffalo, November 15, 1894. 
Nu Chapter established at Medical College of Virginia, March i, 1905. 
Colors : Crimson and Gold. 
Flower: Red Carnation. 
Chapter House, 313 East Grace Street. 






m 



CHAPTERS 



Alpha • • University of Buffalo (Buffalo, N. Y.) 

Beta Onio-Miami Medical College of the University of Cincinnati (Ohio) 

Gamma • ■ Albany Medical College (Albany, N. Y.) 

Delta • • • • .University of Colorado (Denver, Col.) 

Epsilon University and Bellevue Medical College (New York, N. Y.) 

Eta • University of Colorado, Medical Department (Boulder, Col.) 

Iota Leland Stanford, Jr., University (San Francisco, Cal.) 

Nu • . . • • Medical College of Virginia (Richmond, Va.) 

Pi University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, Pa.) 

Rho Jefferson Medical College (Philadelphia, Pa.) 

Tau North Carolina Medical College (Charlotte, N. C.) 

Upsilon Medico-Chirurgical College ( Philadelphia, Pa.) 

Phi Vanderbilt University (Nashville, Tenn.) 

Chi Fordham University (New York City, N. Y.) 

(Psi) Delta Mu University of Maryland (Baltimore, Md.) 




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Barrett, R. C. 
Blankenship, R. C. 
Boisseau, J. G. 
Clarke, E. S. 



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Cf)e J=iaap, 1914 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 
1914 

Flannegan, E. L. 
Hamilton, J. R. 
Herndon, L. S. 



Mercer, W. N. 
Otis, W. J. 
Staton, L. B. 



Mm 



Blackwell, R. B. 
Folkes, C. A. 
Hedgepeth, H. M. 
Lee, J. N. 



Bolderidge, F. M. 
Clark, D. D. 
Middlekauff, H. G. 



Daly, A. R. 
Divers, D. L. 



1915 

Martin, J. A 
McAnaly, W. F. 
Peters, W. A. 



1916 

Miller, J. C. 
Purcell, M. E. 
Ray, A. C. 



1917 

Gilchrist, B. F. 



Vaughan, J. C. 
West, G B. 
Yohannan, J. I. 



Van Pelt, J. F. 
Wyatt. H. B. 



Sumers, T. O. 



1 







Cije t'Mav, 1914 



167 



Phi Rho Sigma 



Founded at Northwestern Medical School, Chicago, 111., October 31, iSqo. 
Upsilon Chapter established April 28, 1905. 
Colors: Old Gold and Crimson. 

CHAPTERS 



Alpha Northwestern University (Chicago, 111. 

Beta University of Illinois (Chicago, 111. 

Gamma Rush Medical College (Chicago 111. 

Delta University of Southern California (Los Angeles, Cal. 

Epsilon Detroit Medical College (Detroit, Mich. 

Zeta University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Theta Tau University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, Minn. 

Eta Creighton University College of Medicine (Omaha, Neb. 

Iota University of Nebraska (Omaha, Neb. 

Kappa Western Reserve University (Cleveland, O. 

Lambda Medico-Chirurgical College ( Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mu -.University of Iowa (Iowa City, la. 

Nu • • Harvard University (Boston, Mass. 

Omicron Wisconsin College of Physicians and Surgeons (Milwaukee, Wis. 

Pi Alpha ■ ■ Indiana L^niversity School of Medicine (Indianapolis, Ind. 

Pi Beta Indiana University School of Medicine (Bloomington, Ind. 

Rho Jefferson Medical College (Philadelphia, Pa. 

Skull and Sceptre • • Yale University (New Haven, Conn. 

L'psilon Medical College of Virginia (Richmond, Va. 

Phi L'uiversity of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, Pa. 

Chi University of Pittsburgh ( Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Psi University of Colorado ( Boulder, Col. 

Alpha Omega Delta University of Buffalo (Buffalo, N. Y. 

Indiana Alumni Association, 308 American Central Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Omega Ohio University Medical Department (Columbus, O. 

Alpha Gamma McGill University (Montreal, Can. 

Alpha Beta College of Physicians and Surgeons (New York 




Broadnax, John W, 
Bullock, H. A. 
Dunn. Join 
Dunn, "W. W. 
Eckles, Beverly 
Fravel, R. C. 



Dutton, Blanton B. 



Geisinger, J. F. 
Gill, W. W. 
Harrison, \^irginius 
Higgins, W. H. 
Hillsman, Blanton L. 
Miller, Roshier W. . 

FRATRES IN URBE 

McLean, Stuart 
Torregroso, M. F. 



Murrell, T. W. 
Pitt, Cullen S. 
Porter, W. B. 
Smith, James H. 
Turm.an, A. E. 
Turman, John W. 



Whitehead, Robt. 






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Cfte X'Mav, 1914 



l^^RATRES IN COLLEGIO 



Jii 



1914 



Carson, V. H. 



Smith, Joe 






Glover, E. T. 
Fletcher, F. P. Jr. 



1915 

Saunders ,A W. 
Ransome, C. B. 



Smith, P. S. 



Cook, S. S. 
Carroll, P. M. 



1916 

Gilmer, W. P. 
Graham, C. F. 



Nelson, Wm. 



1917 
Harwood, John M. Northington, Page 






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Cbe I^map, 1914 



171 



Alpha Kappa Kappa 



Founded, September 29, 1888, IN'Iedical Department, Dartmouth College, 

Hanover, N. H. 
Colors : Myrtle Green and White 



J 



CHAPTERS 

Alpha Medical Department of Dartmouth College (Hanover, N. H.) 

Beta College of Physicians and Surgeons (San Francisco, Cal.) 

Gamma Tufts Medical College (Boston, Mass.) 

Delta Medical Department of University of Vermont (Burlington, Vt.) 

Epsilon Jefferson Medical College (Philadelphia, Pa.) 

Zeta Long Island College Hospital Medical School (Brooklyn, N. Y.) 

Eta College of Medicine, University of Illinois (Chicago, 111.) 

Theta Maine Medical School, Bowdoin College (Portland, Me.) 

Iota Medical Department of University of Syracuse (Syracuse, N. Y.) 

Kappa Marquette University, School of Medicine (Milwaukee, Wis.) 

Lambda Medical Department of Cornell University (Brooklyn, N. Y.) 

Mu Medical Department, University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, Pa.) 

Nu Rush Medical College (Chicago, 111.) 

Xi ; Medical Department of Northwestern University (Chicago, 111.) 

Cmicron Medical Department University of Cincinnati (Cincinnati, O.) 

Pi Starling Ohio Medical University ( Columbus, O. ) 

Rho .Medical Department of University of Colorado (Denver, Col.) 

Sigma Medical Department of University of California (Oakland, Cal.) 

L'psi'.on Medical Department of University of Oregon (Portland, Oregon) 

Chi Medical Department of Vanderbilt University (Nashville, Tenn.) 

Psi Medical Department of University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, Minn.) 

Omega University of Tennessee College of Medicine (Memphis, Tenn.) 

Alpha Beta Medical Department of Tulane University (New Orleans, La.) 

Alpha Gamma ••.••.... Medical Department of University of Georgia 

Alpha Delta Medical Department of McGill University (Montreal, Can.) 

Alpha Epsilon Medical Department of I'niversity of Toronto (Toronto, Can.) 




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172 



Cfte X'Mav, 1014 



Alpha Zeta Medical Dept. George Washington University (Washington, D. C.) 

Alpha Eta Yale Medical College (New Haven, Conn.) 

Alpha Theta ...Medical Department of University of Texas (Galveston, Tex.) 

Alpha Iota University of Michigan, Department of Medicine and Surgery 

(Ann Arbor, Mich.) 

Alpha Kappa Medical College of Virginia (Richmond, Va.) 

Alpha Lambda Medical College of State of South Carolina (Charleston, S. C.) 

Alpha Mu Medical Department, St. Louis University (St. Louis, Mo.) 

Alpha Nu Medical Department, University of Louisville (Louisville, Ky.) 

Alpha Xi Medical Department, Western Reserve University (Cincinnati, O.) 

Alpha Omicron University Medical College (Kansas City, Mo.) 

Alpha Pi Medical Department, University of Pittsburg (Pittsburg, Pa.) 

Alpha Rho Harvard Medical College ( Boston, Mass.) 

Alpha Sigma College of P. S., Medical Department, University of Southern California 

(Los Angeles, Cal.) 



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Arbuckle, L, D. 
Allen, C. D. 
Butler, L. J. 
Boyette, W. I. 
Carr, M. L. 
Cross, R. H. 
Grumpier, L. O 
Cain, J. R. 
Doggett, B. A. 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

Duval, F. F. 

Futrelle, L. M. " 

Flinn, F. 

Granger, W. S. 

Holloway, R. M. 

Harwood, P. C. 

Keel, H. L. 

Parker, C. P. 

Perry, V. P. 



Porterfield, H. 
Redd, I. K. 
Snead, G. H. 
Sales, Judson 
Tucker, W. S. 
Willis, W. M. 
Wilkins, W. W. 
Yates, O. R. 



i 



FRATRES IN URBE 



Bynum, Archie M. 
Boyle, Marshall L. Jr 
Garcin, Ramon D. 
Hord, Benjamin, A. 



Ryder, Ollie A. 
Simmons, Walter D. Jr. 
Kern, Robt. L. 



Traynham, Albert P. 
Woodson, George C. 
Parker, William H. 





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Ci)e xmav, 1014 



175 



Chi Zeta Chi 



Founded, Nineteen Hundred and Three, at the University of Georgia. 
Colors : Purple and Old Gold. 
Flower: White Carnation. 
Chapter installed, 1909. 

CHAPTERS 

Alpha University of Georgia (Augusta, Ga. 

Beta College of Physicians and Surgeons (New York 

Gamma New York Polyclinic Medical College (New York 

Delta University of Maryland (Baltimore, Md. 

Epsilon College of Physicians and Surgeons (Atlanta, Ga. 

Zeta Baltimore Medical College (Baltimore, Md. 

Eta Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, Md. 

Theta Vanderbilt University (Nashville, Tenn. 

Iota Southern Carolina Medical College (Charleston, S. C. 

Kappa Atlanta School of Medicine (Atlanta, Ga. 

Lambda College of Physicians and Surgeons (Memphis, Tenn. 

Mu Tulane University ( New Orleans, La. 

Nu L'niversity of Arkansas (Little Rock, Ark. 

Xi St. Louis University (St. Louis, Mo. 

Omicron Washington University ( St. Louis, Mo. 

Pi College of Physicians and Surgeons (Chicago, 111. 

Rho College of Physicians and Surgeons ( Baltimore, Md. 

Sigma George Washington University (Washington, D. C. 

Tau Jefferson Medical College (Philadelphia, Pa. 

Upsilon ■ ■ .Fordham University (New York 

Phi Lincoln University (Knoxville, Tenn. 

Chi • • Long Island Medical College (Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Psi Medical College of Virginia (Richmond, Va. 

Omeo-a Birmingham Medical College (Birmingham, Ala. 





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^tiz I^Eap, 1914 



FRATRES IX URBE 



P. D. Lipscomb, M. D. 
M, C. Sycle, M. D. 
T. B. Weatherly, M. D. 
T. S. Shelton, M. D. 



J. S. McCarthy, M. D. 
B. Hulcher, M. D. 
E. W.Gee, M. D. 
H. Bernard. M. D. 







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Ayers, Y. W. '14. 

Dwdoin, G. E. '14 
Connell, H. R. '14. 
Gorman, J. R. '14, 



Anderson, J. B. '15. 
Bucalo, H. D. '15, 
Gill, G. B. '15. 
Godwin, Grover C. '15. 



Brigman, W. B. '16. 
Daniels, H. S. '16. 



Foltz, J. D. '17. 
Hughes, C. R. '17. 



Roll of Active Members 

Seniors. 

Hamlin, F. E. '14. 
Hannaljass, J. W. '14. 
Thompson, W. P. '14. 



Timberlake, R. E. '14. 
Torrence, G. A '14. 
Young, C. B. '14 



Juniors. 

Lee, H. E. '15. 
Ligon, J. J. '15. 
Munsey, P. J '15. 



Sophomores. 

Hamner, J. L. '16. 
Hamner, J. E. '16. 



Freshmen. 

Munsey, J. B. '17. 
Pittman, E. E. '17. 



Porter, J. E, '15. 
Sumrell, G. H. '15 
Wood, G. V. '15. 



Johnson, E. G. '16. 
Rolston, G. W. '16. 



Sherrick, W. R. '17. 
Wilkinson, R. W 



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Founded at the University of Michigan, April 4, 1889. 
Xi Chapter established at the University College of Medicine, March 26, 1903. 
Colors : Lavender and Cream. 
Flower : Red Rose. 



CHAPTERS 

Alpha Ann Arbor, Michigan 

Gamma ■ ■ jo. • • • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Delta • Baltimore, Maryland 

Eta • ■ Baltimore, Maryland 

Theta ■ ■ • Indianapolis, Indiana 

Iota ■ • San Francisco, California 

Kappa •...-..... Columbus, Ohio 

Lambda ■ • • • • Chicago, Illinois 

Mu Buffalo, New York 

Xi • Richmond, Virginia 

Omicron Toronto, Ontario 

Pi Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Rho .' • . - ■ Chicago, Illinois 

Tau St. Louis, Missouri 

Phi ■. Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Chi Kansas City, Missouri 

Psi Lincoln, Nebraska 

Omega • '. . . Nashville, Tennessee 

Alpha- Epsilon Portland, Oregon 

Alpha-Zeta , Atlanta, Georgia 

Alpha-Eta Atlanta, Georgia 





i8o 



Cfte %'Mav, 1914 






KRATRES IX COLLEGIO 



R. F. Hamilton 
F. A. Dunford 
J. B. Haller 
W. B. Caldwell 
S. D. Kent 
E. G. Gates 
J. A. Alexander 
J. P. Santori 
B. P. Ewell 



D. F. Keel 

C. G. J.indberg- 

J. B. Williams 

B. P.Jones 
V. M. Barnes 
G. W. Yates 

C. W. Hoae 
P. A. JVTorrell 
H. S. Boatwright 



lI'M 





FRATRES IN FACULTATE 



Dr. T. M. Scales 
]Dr. J. M- Hughes 
Dr. F. R. Kelly 
Dr. R. L. Simpson 



Dr. R. H. Jeffries 
Dr. W. J. Cowardin 
Dr. H. G. Russell 
Dr. R. I. Pusey 



Dr. H. L. Mears 
Dr. M. D. Rudd 
Dr. J. L. Mears 
Dr. B. T. Blackwell 



FRATRES IN URBE 



Dr. W. E. Broaddus 



Dr. R. C. Walden 
Dr. M. G. Carnell 
Dr. B. J. Bloxton 
Dr. B. V. McCray 




Cfte I^map, 1914 



183 



Psi Omega 



Founded, Eighteen Hundred and Xinety-two, 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. 

Colors : Blue and JVIiite. 

Flowers: Jlolets and Roses. 

Gamma Omicron Chapter installed, November, i( 

CHAPTERS 



(fk 



Alpha Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 

Beta • • New York College of Dentistry 

Gamma Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery (Philadelphia) 

Delta Tufts Dental College (Boston, Mass.) 

Epsilon • -Western Reserve University (Cleveland, Ohio) 

Zeta University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia) 

Eta • ■ . . . Philadelphia Dental College 

Theta University of Buffalo (Buffalo, N. Y.) 

Iota • • ■..-■.. Northwestern University (Chicago, 111.) 

Kappa Chicago College of Dental Surgery (Chicago, 111.) 

Lambda University of Minnesota (Minnesota, Minn.) 

Mu University of Denver (Denver, Col.) 

Nu Pittsburg Dental College ( Pittsburg, Pa. ) 

Xi • Marquette University (Milwaukee, Wis.) 

Mu Delta Harvard University Dental School 

Omicron Louisville College of Dental Surgery 

Pi Baltimore Medical College, Dental Department 

Beta Sigma College of Physicians and Surgeons, Dental Department 

(San Francisco, Cal.) 

Rho Ohio College of Dental Surgery (Cincinnati, O.) 

Sigma Medico-Chirurgical College ( Philadelphia) 

Tau Atlanta Dental College (Atlanta, Ga.) 

Upsilon University of Southern California (Los Angeles, Cal.) 

Phi University of Maryland (Baltimore) 



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184 



Cl)e I^Hap, 1914 



Chi North Pacific Dental College ( Portland, Ore. ) 

Psi Starling Ohio Medical University ( Columbus, O. ) 

Omega • • Indiana Dental College (Indianapolis, Ind.) 

Beta Alpha • • University of Illinois (Chicago) 

Beta Gamma George Washington University (Washington, D. C.) 

Beta Delta ITniversity of California (San Francisco, Cal.) 

Beta Epsilon New Orleans College of Dentistry 

Beta Zeta St. Louis Dental College (St. Louis, Mo.) 

Beta Theta Georgetown University (Washington, D. C.) 

Gamma Iota • • Southern Dental College (Atlanta, Ga.) 

Gamma Kappa • University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) 

Gamma Lambda ■ • College of Dental and Oral Surgery of New York 

Gamma Mu University of Iowa (Iowa City) 

Gamma Nu • • Vanderbilt University (Nashville, Tenn.) 

Gamma Omicron Medical College of Virginia (Richmond, Va.) 

Gamma Pi Washington University, Dental Dept. (St. Louis, Mo.) 

Delta Rho Kansas City Dental College 

Delta Tau Wisconsin College of P. & S. (Milwaukee, Wis.) 

Delta Upsilon Texas Dental College (Houston, Tex.) 

Delta Phi • • Western Dental College (Kansas City, Mo.) 





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Cf)e I*iaap, X914 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

Seniors 
Chandler, W. M. Gillum, V. V. 



Baldwin, W. W. 
Brown, J. W. Jr. 



Juniors 

Campbell, T. A. 
Dudley, A. D. 



Kramer, C. S. 
O'Keefe, C. S. 



Nefif, J. S 



Freshmen 

Wood, G. B. Jr. 





Cfte X'Mav, 1914 



187 



Pi Theta Sigma 

Founded 1902. 

Colors : Red and White. 
Flower : Red Rose. 

CHAPTERS 

Alpha Philadelphia College of Pharmacy (Philadelphia Pa.) 

Beta Medical College of Virginia (Richmond, Va.) 

Gamma • • Brooklyn College of Pharmacy (Brooklyn, N. Y.) 

Delta University of Kansas (Lawrence, Kan.) 



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HONORARY MEMBERS 




Wortley F. Rudd, M. A. Ph. B. 
Roshier W. Miller, M. D. Ph. G. 
George E. Barksdale, M. D. Ph. G. 



T. Ashby Miller, Ph. G. 

A.. Bolenbough, B. Sc. in Pharmacy 





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Morrow, E. W. 
Ray, C. W. 
Irwin, W. L. 



Ci)e I^Hap, 1914 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 



Smith, W. R. 
Cocke. G. B. 
Fray, J. H. 



Resident Members 



Zirkle, H. W. 
Shirley, W. G. 



Bolenbaugh, A. B. 
Barksdale, Geo. E. 
Brandis. E. L. 
Ligon. J. A. 



Williams J. B. 
Woolfork, H. 
Whitehead, H. G. 
Johanus, E. 



Miller, T. A. 
Crumpton, E. D. 
Wightman, Jno. 




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I Q I It 



Zeta Delta Chi 

Founded, Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, Nineteen Hundred and Two. 
Installed Medical College of Virginia, Nineteen Hundred and Eleven. 
Colors : Gold and Black. 
Flower : Daffodil. 

CHAPTERS 

Alpha Philadelphia College of Pharmacy 

Beta • Baylor University (Texas) 

Gamma Medical College of Virginia 

Delta Southern Methodist University (Texas) 

F.psilon Medico-Chirurgical College (Philadelphia) 





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Cije I=Hap, 1914 






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HONORARY MEMBERS 

Frank H. Beadles, Ph. G., M. D. Aubry A. Houser, M. D. 

N. Thomas Ennett, Ph. G., M. D. H. G. Latimer, Ph. G., M. D. 

Frank M. Reade, Ph. G., M. D. 



■f'M ! 



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FRATRES IN URBE 



Guy R. Harrison, Ph. G., D. D. S. 
R. E. Mitchell, Ph. G., M. D. 

W. A. Smith 
R. H. Southworth 
W. J. Adamson 
Macon Ware 



J. N. Elder, Ph. G., M. D. 
T. B. Cauthorne 
C. A. Cleveland 
J. S. Patterson 
T. W. McCrary 
L. G. Bolton 
S. Beaton 



riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



D. W. Paulette 
L. A. Johnson 



^ W. T. Van Pelt 

S. A. Housenflook 
W. E. Bonds 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 



Seniors 

R. M. Hawthorne 
H. T. Haley 

Juniors 

W. E. Cole 
L. J. Henley 
W. H. Hoover 



W. A. Homes 

L. W. Armentroiit 



J. A. Patterson 
R. P. Booth 
R. T. Moseley 



/A 





Theta Nu Epsilon 

Founded at Wesleyan University, 1877. 
Sigma Sigma Chapter established 1899. 
Reorganized 1909. 

Colors: Green and Black. 

CHAPTERS 



Alpha ■ • • • • Wesleyan University 

Beta • Syracuse University 

Gamma ■ • • • • Union College 

Zeta University of California 

Eta • • . ■ • • ■ Colgate University 

Theta Kenyon College 

Iota ■ • • • • • Western Reserve Medical College 

Lambda Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

Mu Stevens' Institute of Technology 

Nu Lafayette College 

Sigma ■ • • ■ New York University 

Tau Wooster University 

Upsilon ■■...■ University of Michigan 

Phi • ■ Rutgers College 

Psi Ohio State College 

Alpha-Zeta University of Vermont 

Alpha-Iota Harvard University 

Alpha-Omega Columbia University 

Beta-Beta Ohio Wesleyan University 

Beta-Omicron Colby University 

Gamma-Beta Jefferson Medical College 

Delta-Delta University of Maine 

Delta- Kappa Bowdoin College 

Delta-Rho Northwestern University 

Delta-Sigma Kansas University 

Epsilon-Epsilon - Case School of Applied Science 

Delta- Phi Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Kappa- Rho Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 

Lambda-Sigma • ■ • Yale University 

Omicron-Omega ■ St. Lawrence University 

Sigma-Tau University of Maryland 

Omega-Kappa Baltimore Medical College 





196 



^U I^Eap, 1914 



Omicron-Omicron • • ". Ohio Northern University- 
Alpha- Alpha Purdue University 

Zeta-Zeta ■ • • • • . . University of Wyoming 

Eta-Eta Massachusetts Agricultural College 

AIpha-Theta University of Missouri 

Theta-Theta University of West Virginia 

Kappa-Kappa • • •...•• University of Texas 

Mu-Mu Leland Stanford, Jr., University 

Xi-Xi • • • ■ ■ • University of Louisville 

Nu-Nu • • • Marquette University 

Rho-Rho • ■ Norwich University 

Epsilon-Deuteron Graduate Chapter, University of Rochester 

Alumni Association of Alpha Iota • • Boston, Mass. 

Sigma-Sigma • Medical College of Virginia 

Tau-Tau - ■ Baker University 



Budd, S. C. 
Brunk, O. C. 
Baughman, Greer 
Bryan, R. C. 
Bosher, L. C. 
Hoggan, J. A. C. 
Harrison, G. R. 
Hillsman, B. L. 
Hutchinson, H. M. 
Marsteller, A. A. 
Miller, C. M. 
Preston, R. S. 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Terrell, E. H. 
Robins, C. R. 
Wiggs, L. B 
Willis, A. M. 
Johnston, Geo. B. 
Price, L. T. 
McGuire, Stuart 
Gray, A. L. 
La Roque, G. Paul 
Michaux, Stuart 
Nelson, J. G. 
Murrell, T. W. 



Upshur, F. W. 
Lewis, C. H. 
Gill, W. W. 
Williamson, W. F. 
Newton, McGuire 
Porter, W. B. 
Hopkin,s, W. B. 
Trice, E. T. 
Geisinger, J. F. 
Hodges, Fred 
Mason, H. N. 
Johns, F. S. 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 
Seniors. 



Chandler, W. M. 
Denit, G. B. 



Braswell, J. C. 
Dudley, A. D. 
Folkes, C. H. 



Fowlkes, W. B. 
Gillam, V. V. 

Juniors. 

Foster, J. B. 
Gayle, R. F. Jr. 
Hardin, E. M. 



Hill. D. H. 

Hut ton, F. B. Jr. 



Hedgepeth, H M. 
Hollenbeck, L. L. 
Peake, R. H. 




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The Passing of Time, or Life in the Desert 

A PLAYLET— IN ONE ACT. 

Dramatis Personae. 

A Wizard Dr. E. G. H. 

A Dermatologist Dr. Mac. 

A Neurologist Dr. Bev. T. 

Scene — A darkened laboratory, with tall test-tubes and stomach-pumps grow- 
ing round about. 

Act L Scene i. 

Wizard: "Ninhydrin glucozone, indicanuria !" 

Neurol ( with ptosis of left lid) : "Brachialgia nystagmus, Burdach and 



Goll." 



Wizard (drawing a sterile pipette from his boot) 
They hide behind a capillary tube. 
Enter Dermatol showing a "risorius sardonicus." 
Dermatol (sings while accompanying himself on a bulla) : 
"Erythema maculata, 
Nodulosa indurata. 
Lichen planus. Impetigo 
Dermatitis intertrigo." 
Wizard and Neurologist spring into view. 
Wizard: "Spirocheta Pallida, refringens dentium!" 
Neurol: "Myopathic facies, paraplegia neuresthenia !" 
Dermatol (picking scale on his bulla) : 
"Annularis scarletina 
Idiopathic oedema, 
Herpes zoster. Trichorrhexis 
Rodent ulcer, monilethrix. 



"Allantoin !" 




Neurol (showing alopecia with lacrimation) : "O syringomyelia! O 
spinal gliosis!"' (Turns to Wizard): "Tabes thrombosis, ankle clonus with 
coma?" 

Wizard (completing an Abderhalden) : "Eosinophilia myelocyte A^ernier 
spleno-myelogenous index." 

Neurologist and Dermatologist retire behind some normal flora, singing 
"Urticaria pigmentosa 
Paraphasia psychesthenia. 
Varacella pustulosa 
Hydrocephalic tic ischemia." 



Scene II. 
(Wizard, discovered alone squatting on a stool.) 

Wizard : Hematozoon f alci parium hyperglycemia inoscopy, achroodextrin 
catharallis." (Takes blood from pseudopod of amoeba coH for Wasserman 
test) : "Ishgabibble." 

Curtain. 

LS. Z. D. 




Cfte J=Eap, 1914 



Essay on Blood Pressure 




RIOR to the period between 1900 and 1910, very little was 
known by the general practitioner of the value of sphygmo- 
manometry. Pharmacologists and a few pioneer physicians, 
however, had recognized the importance of this adjunct in 
diagnosis, treatment and prognosis, and it was during this 
period between 1900 and 1910 that, through the efforts of 
such men as Janeway, Erlanger, Faught and many others 
that sphygmomanometry came into prominence and its value 
recognized by the profession. 

In order to get a clear conception of what is meant by blood-pressure, it 
is necessary to mention briefly a few of the essential facts concerning the 
physiology of the circulation. The heart and blood vessels constitute a closed 
system containing a certain amount of blood. By the rhythmic contraction 
of the heart the blood is kept flowing continously through the system of vessels. 
It is evident, however, that there is another important factor necessary to main- 
tain this continous flow, and this factor is pressure. 

The mechanism of the blood pressure is a most delicately adjusted one. 
It depends principally upon three factors, namely, the beating heart, the elas- 
ticity of the arterial walls, and the peripheral resistance. An increase of either 
of these factors raises blood pressure, while a decrease of either of them will 
cause a fall in pressure, other factors being equal. A failing heart naturally 
means a lowering blood pressure, while a strong and rapid heart tends to in- 
crease blood pressure. Diminished tone in the arterial wall lowers blood pres- 
sure, while increased tone raises the pressure. 

The peripheral resistance, or capillary system, is largely under the direct 
control of the vasomotor system. An increased peripheral resistance at once 
raises pressure on the arterial side and lowers pressure on the venous side of 
the system, while a lessened periphral rsistance has exactly the opposite effect. 
So great may be this lessened resistance, or dilatation of the capillaries, that 
the patient hterally is "bled into his own vessels." 

Blood pressure in the aorta is higher than at any other point in the cir- 
culation, and is lowest in the superior vena cava, where it is almost nil. Pres- 



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Cl)e t'Mav, 1914 



20I 





sure upon the blood, therefore, greatly decreases as it makes the circuit from 
the heart through the aorta, the smaller arteries, capillaries and veins, and is 
emptied into the heart by the superior vena cava. 

Venous pressure, especially when high, has much significance. The dilated 
veins are easily seen and indicate either obstruction to the flow, or lack of 
pressure from behind. Recently much importance is being attached to venous 
pressure, and this will doubtless result in more attention to this part ofi blood 
pressure work. Capillary pressure, when low, is an important diagnostic sign 
in aortic regurgitation. Arterial pressure is, at present, of the most importance 
to the clinician, and has a wide and varying field of usefulness. There are 
two phases of arterial pressure, namely ; systolic and diastolic. By systolic 
pressure is meant the pressure within a given artery when the maximum force 
is exerted within it during ventricular systole, and diastolic; pressure represents 
the lowest pressure occuring in the artery during cardiac diastole. Normally 
diastolic pressvire is between twenty-five and forty millimeters of mercury 
lower than systolic pressure. By adding systolic and diastolic pressure, and 
dividing this sum by two, we obtain the mean blood pressure. By subtracting 
diastolic pressure from systolic pressure, we obtain the pulse pressure, which 
recently has been found to have an important bearing upon the patient's con- 
dition. Unless otherwise specified, however, the term blood pressure refers 
to systolic pressure. 

There are several methods of obtaining blood pressure, both systolic and 
diastolic. For clinical purposes the brachial artery is used. Any one of the 
many varieties of modern instruments having a cuff twelve centimeters in 
width is quite satisfactory and accurate, and renders the operation a com- 
paratively sirriple one. 

Blood pressure varies a little under normal conditions, and it is necessary 
to know these variations in order to tell whether they are pathologic or not. 
It is well to remember that a little excitement or interest incident to the opera- 
tion on the part of the patient will cause a slight increase in pressure. Females 
normally have a pressure about ten millimeters lower than males, while in 
different races there is practically no variation. An altitude of six thousand 
feet has been found not to affect a normal individual's pressure but does cause 
a slight increase in a tuberculous individual, which doubtless is beneficial to 
such a patient. Moderate amounts of alcohol or tobacco do not materially in- 
fluence blood pressure. Muscular exercise causes a rise in pressure of five ro 






Doubtless the most important of the normal variations occurs with age. 
At five years of age a pressure of ninety millimeters has been found to be 
normal. A gradual increase occurs with age, and at twenty years one hundred 
and twenty millimeters is generally considered normal. For each year above 
twenty one-half millimeter is added to one hundred and twenty, so that a man 
sixty-five years of age will normally have a pressure of one hundred and 
forty-five millimeters. These figures are obviously more of less approximate, 
a few millimeters above or below having no pathologic significance, but should 
be borne in mind in taking blood pressure. 

The pathologic conditions in which there may occur a variation of twenty- 
five millimeters or more above or below the normal, and a correct interpre- 
tation of these variations is what chiefly concerns the clinician in applying 
sphygmomanometry. Likewise a steadily rising or falling pressure has much 
clinical significance, often being a guide to the patient's condition, especially 
in the chronic disease. 

Sphygmomanometry perhaps is not yet of much diagnostic value in the 
acute infections but has some significance in treatment and prognosis. Thus, 
a gradually falling pressure in pneumonia means beginning vasomotor paralysis 
from toxemia and, should the pressure in millimeters of mercury fall below 
the pulse rate per minute, the prognosis becomes very unfavorable. In typhoid 
fever low blood pressure is characteristic. If perforation takesi place a slight 
rise in pressure followed by a gradual fall is a sign of diagnostic value. If 
hemorrhage occurs a sudden fall in pressure without the initial rise points at 
once to the patient's condition. 

A person having a persistent low pressure, without other definite symptoms, 
ought to have a careful examination for the chronic wasting diseases, notably 
tuberculosis. A large per cent of these individuals are said, sooner or later, to 
develop this dreaded infection. A gradual rise in pressure, extending over a 
few weeks or a month in a tuberculous patient, is a very favorable sign. The 
persistent high tension of chronic nephritis is an important point in diagnosis, 
and a valuable guide in treatment of these difficult and long continued cases. 
These chronic conditions and the various cardio-vaseular diseases give sphyg- 
momanometry a wide field of usefulness in life insurance work. 

In cerebral hemorrhage a very high blood pressure is seen, which dif- 
ferentiates this condition from cerebral embolism in which condition pres- 




sure is low. A steadily increasing pressure in cerebral hemorrhage, moreover, 
means that the hemorrhage has not stopped. A hypotension after a surgical 
^^ operation or an accident indicates shock, or beginning shock, and treatment 

for this condition must be given. 

Sphygmomanometr}', when done as a routine, ranks with urinalysis in 
obstetrics. A toxemia from faulty metabolism will often manifest itself by a 
hyper-tension even before any changes occur in the urine. As the toxemia in- 
creases, the blood pressure rises, being almost an index to the toxicity of the 
patient. However, in the fulminant toxemias of pregnancy a very low pres- 
sure, as a result of an overwhelming toxicity, is often seen and points to a 
fatal termination. 

These are only a few of the well-known and everyday conditions in which 
blood pressure works an unquestionably an important place. Time and ex- 
perience will surely increase our knowledge of this comparatively new addi- 
tion to clinical medicine, and it is to be hoped that its range of usefulness will 
continue to increase. DiastoHc pressure, for instance, has only within the 
past few years been found to be of importance, and more attention to this 
phase of blood pressure will surely reveal important truths. Many clinicians 
have) already declared that the sphygmomanometer is equal in importance with 
the thermometer, and it is probable that within a reasonable time it will prove 
worthy of such an important place in medicine. 

C. I. Sease, '15. 

Prize AVinning Essay. • 



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Ci)e 3E'iaap, 1914 



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"Fuzzy" in the Pit 

Once there was a young medico, 
His name was "Bouquet Bill,' 

But as Bill wore a female gown — 
He couldn't hold a "dill." 




When Bill his table had to move — 
Behind he left his bucket, 

So, just to even up "dill' 'scores — 
Deane walked up and took it ! 



— W. N. M., '14. 



aL 



I 




ATHLEnCS 





Review of the 19 13 Football Season 





O the casual observer, the past year is one of blank defeat but 
in review of the facts of the different games modifications 
of this view-point must be made. 

Starting with Washington & Lee University, a peer of 
any team in the South, the Medicos lined up on the 27th of 
September, untrained and unpracticed, and lacking that most 
essential quality — teamwork. These facts are sufficient to 
account for the final score, 28 to o. 

On the 14th of October, the team journeyed to Chapel Hill to line up 
against a team coached by a staff secured from one of the best universities, and 
on reaching the field, in a fatigued condition, were forced to play thirteen 
minute quarters. Fumbles at critical moments played an im'portant part in 
our defeat and gave to Carolina, the ball within easy striking of our goals. 
The game resulted in a score of 15 to o. 

October the nth, saw the contest on a muddy field between M. C. V. 
and A. & M. in Raleigh, N. C. Injuries of the previous week as well as those 
during the game, resulted in the loss of Tyler at center and necessitated the 
placing of men into positions to which they were unaccustomed, but the boys 
fought gamely and held the score to 13 to 7. 

On the 15th of October, after a rest of only four days from the battle 
with the South Atlantic champions, the team met the University of Mississippi, 
at Richmond. That Mississippi was clearly outclassed, was evident to all who 
witnessed the contest, they having made only three first downs during the 
game. However the fickle Goddess of Fortune elected to smile upon our 
opponents ,and a forward pass and goal in the last quarter resulted in our 
defeat again, by a score of 7 to 6. 

Georgetown University was our next opponent. The whole story of our 
defeat may be summed up on one name — Costello, and yet a critic writing in 
the Washington Post, declared that "the worst M. C. V. deserved in Saturday's 
game was a o to o score." With this remark by one who knows football, nothing 
further need be said concerning the game, which resulted in a score of 20 to o. 



Much honor is due to the coaching staff of the past season, composed as 
it was of graduates and players of the combined schools, and yet Httle friction 
existed between coaches and players compared to what might have been ex- 
pected, owing to the fact that heretofore the schools had been bitter rivals for 
athletic honors. The welding of these two bodies of men, presented a difficult 
problem, but past differences were forgotten, and every man exerted himself 
towards the formation of a frictionless football machine. 

Mention must be made of those students who forfeited time (which thev 
knew could never be made up before the end of a course over-full of workj 
and to those who formed the scrub team. 



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208 



CI)e J:=Kap, 1914 







Dr. Wiggs 



Athletic Association 

President L. T. Stoneburner 

Vice-President Keel 

Secretary Hardin 

Treasurer W. N. Willis 

Coach, Johns 

Assistant Manager Football Team Braswell 

Manager Football Team Paramore 

Captain Football Team J. C. Walker 

Manager Baiseball Team Kellam 

Advisory Board . .Drs Wiggs. Baughman and Willis 



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Cfte I*Elap, 1914 



mi 




Assistant Manager Braswell 



209 1^ 





Manager Paramore 







"Jim" was the heaviest man on the team 
last year, but his chief trouble was laziness, 
yet when playing with the University of 
Minnesota he was chosen by Walter Camp 
in igio for All-American honors. This is 
his last year in College and in football, and 
the only sorrow he has is that he will be 
unable to line up against the University of 
North Carolina again. 



Johns • • Coach 

In whipping into shape a team out of 
former rivals, handicapped by lack of time, 
and heavy school duties on the part of his 
men. Coach Johns has won our respect and 
admiration as a coach and as a man. 




"Babe" was married last year, and it was 
only after much argument that he would 
agree to come out to practice, but after 
making his decision he exhibited that dash 
and vim which have won him honors be- 
fore on many a gridiron. "Babe" is a third 
year man, and we hope that he will be with 
us again next year to help us defeat his old 
Alma Mater, the University of North 
Carolina. 




Brock WELL Center 

Age 23, height 5 ft. 9 in., weight 185 lbs. 

"Brock" is an all-round man, playing 
equally as well at guard as at center. He 
is surprisingly active for a man of his 
chunky build, and equal to any occasion, 
having been used in the backfield in emer- 
gency. He secured his previous training at 
William and Mary College, having played 
on the team there for two successive years. 
He is a third year man, and great things 
are expected of him next year. 



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Cl)e I^Hap, 1914 








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OzLix Right Guard 

Age 22. height 5 ft. ii in., weight 175 lbs. 

Ozlin is the most dependable on the 
squad. Regardless of weather conditions, 
he was always "on the job" and ready for 
work. Ozlin is a Senior, and next year's 
team will surely miss this sturdy guard. 



Stafford -Left Guard 

Age 23, height 6 ft., weight 170 lbs. 

Stafiford exhibits at all times that quality 
which makes a dangerous line-man — ag- 
gressiveness. No one could have seen him 
playing with blood and grin equally dis- 
tributed over his freckled face without 
"warming up to him." Stafford is a Sopho- 
more, and his services to tl e team for the 
next two vcars will be invaluable. 



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Cfte X'-n^v, 1914 



213 







Foster -Left End 

Age 21, height 5 ft. 8 in., weight 165 lbs. 

"Mike" insists that he is not Irish, yet no 
one from "the Ould Sod" could delight 
more in a mix-up than he. He is always 
under every play, smashing interferences 
and getting his man ; wonderfully fast, and 
his ability in handling forward passes is 
well recognized. This is "Mike's" third 
year, and he is counted upon to do great 
things for the 1914 team. 




Robertson Right End 

Age 20, height 5 ft. 11 in., weight 160 lbs. 

"Robbie" is of that type of men who talk 
little and do much. His brilliant playing 
at right end has made him an invaluable 
asset to the team. His ability to get down 
the field under punts, his deadly tackling, 
and his unerring accuracy in handling for- 
ward passes will assure him a position on 
the team for the next two years. 



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7A 




ScHENCK Quarterback Hardin • - • Tackle 

Age 22,, height 5 ft. 7 in., weight 150 lbs. Age 21, height 6 ft. i in., weight 180 lbs. 



This mild-eyed boy becomes a demon of 
energy when he dons his padless gray pants 
and cavorts around from his station at 
quarterback. He is a genius at picking out 
the weakest spots in the defense, and as a 
team general is unsurpassed. His long ex- 
perience both at William and Mary and at 
M. C. V. will make him indispensable to 
next year's team. 



Hardin is a pharmacist, but the opiates 
he mixes do not affect to the slightest de- 
gree his activity on the gridiron. This is 
his first year on the team and his Senior 
year at College, and his brilliant playing 
in the line, both in smashing plays and 
opening up holes for his backs, was a most 
valuable asset to the team. 





HoLLENBECK Left Halfback 

Age 22, height 5 ft. 11 in., weight 165 lbs. 

This was "Beck's" first year on the team 
as a regular .and despite the extra weight 
he carried in the form of a mammoth nose- 
guard, he certainly could keep his head and 
feet working in a manner bewildering to 
his opponents. This is "the Yankee's" third 
year ,and he should be one of the main- 
stays in the backfield of the 1914 team. 



FuTRELLE • • . . .Right Halfback 

Age 24, height 5 ft. 10 in., weight 165 lbs. 

"Lokie" plays a most brilliant game in 
the backfield. His ability to diagnose the 
attack and prevent gain in his territory is 
only equalled by his speed and rare judg- 
ment in picking holes in the defense and 
making long gains. He is another mem- 
ber of the Senior class, and his loss will 
be keenly felt by next year's team. 



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CI)e I=Clap, 1914 





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JusTis • Halfback 

Age 23, height 5 ft. g in., weight 160 lbs. 

Leon has had much experience at Rich- 
mond College and plays like a veteran in 
the backfield. He is naturally modest and 
shy, but he loses this shyness when he dons 
his moleskins, and the harder the game the 
harder he fights. For the next two years 
he may be regarded as a fixture in the 
backfield. 



.Fullback 



Hardy ......•• 

Age 24, height 6 ft. 4 in., weight 190 lbs. 

"Tom," being a Senior, has played his 
last game for M. C. V., and it is with 
deep regret that we lose him. A veritable 
giant at both offensive and defensive tac- 
tics, and a man feared by his opponents at 
all staegs of the game. Tom is also a 
punter of no mean ability ,and his loss will 
be felt by the team in years to come. 






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mc I^Hlap, 1914 




M. C. V. Basket-ball Team 

LTHOUGH from the standpoint of games won, the record of 
the basket-ball team was not a marked success, yet since all 
things must have a beginning we believe that in the intro- 
duction of basket-ball at the Medical College of Virginia and 
in the prospects for next season, our work has been worth 
while. 

When in November a city basket-ball league was or- 
ganized under the name of Federation League of Richmond, 
the Medical College of Mrginia was invited through Dr. Murrel, chairman 
of the athletic committee, to enter as a member of class A league. Other 
teams were : Richmond Howitzers, Union Theological Seminary, Richmond 
Light Infantry Blues, John Marshall Athletic Club, and Richmond College. 
Believing this would be a step for the betterment of sports and initiate this 
game into college, a team was organized with Meyers as Manager. 

The team was handicapped by a lack of men, due to the demands of 
studies, in this the year of adjustment of the combined schools and by an 
almost total loss of practice on account of the need of a court. However the 
team stuck to its schedule winning some games and fighting all to a finish. 
The quintet thatiought the season through were: Meyers (Mgr.), Ransone, 
Moseley, Remine and Hamner. This husky little bunch was... never defeated 
until the whistle blew the last time. At stationary guard Ransone put up the 
chief defense of the team. For the offense, Hamner at stationary forward 
furnished many spectacular shots, especially when he was apparently covered. 
Meyers was noted for his long shots, attempting shots from all points of the 
floor. Moseley and Remine were credited with work in all departments, 
figuring chiefly in the scoring, but work in other departments was equally 
creditable. Moseley at center, though not so tall, jumped the tallest to a 
standstill, and Remine at guard was always equal to his man. 
M.C. v., 19; Blues, 16. 
M. C. v., 23; Richmond College, 29. 
M. C. v., 21 ; Howitzers, 37. 
M. C. v., 21 ; Union Theological Seminary, 39. 
M. C. v., 16; Fredericksburg Y. M. C. A., 15. 
M. C. v., II ; Randolph-Macon, 21. 
M. C. v., 25 ; John Marshall Club, 40. 
M. C. v., 23; Blues, II. 
M. C. v., 19; Howitzers, 40. 




I 



^ 



1. "Fitts" lead but to "Graves." 

2. Tis so because "Hern-don" it and "Boisseau" it. 

3. If "Parrott", steps on "Henkel's" "Corns" and his "Lipshutz" out "Walk- 
up" and "Tucker" in. 

4. "Carter" is a "Duke," not a "Mer-cer." 

5. When the "Bowman" went out and shot "Byrds," "Ravens," "Parrots," 
"Martins" and "Turkeys" came down in "Torrence." 

6. "Rats" do- not seem to like the "'Penoid" bone. 

7. The village "Smith" looked "Stern" when he tried to "Ben-nett." 

8. If you cannot get vasaline, use "Dil-lard." 

9. While sailing in a "Blanken-ship" on a "Timber-lake" in "Holland" "Con- 
nell" caught a "Hanni-bass." 

19. As the child had "Redd" eyes and "Cata," the mother asked "Wil- 
son" live? 

11. "Dalton" brought "Ur-bach" when he returned from the marriage. 

12. Some "Fowlkes" are "Good-win-ners." 

13. If in need of a "Barber" just "C. H. Scott." 

14. "Wi-att" 10 P. M., whether boy or girl. 

15. Which is the "Gorman" "Skinny Carson" or "Fats Mears"? 

16. This man has "Redd" hair, a "Glass" eye, a "Cross" expression, "Corns" 
on his feet, walks "Parrott" toed, and has "Cata;" Now "Stat-on" paper 
your diagnosis. — Dr. Call. 

17. We are not "Danish" but "Irish." — "(Flinn" and "Flannigan)." 

18. Nelson is "Bowden" at the "Parrish?" 

19. "0-tis" a "Hamilton" watch ! 

20. "Johnny's" horse is neither slow "Nor-fleet." 

21. See "Wiggington" for Autos. 

22. Make "Hayes" where the "Winn" blows. 

23. It takes a "Young" and "Hardy" "Laird" to climb the "Hill" to medicine. 

24. "Mike Sinton" sounds Hke the lost chord when he tries to sing. 
■ 25. "Barret" said, "I will do dis, 'Den-it.' " 

26. "Thompson" saw that "Cozart" was fuzzed up when he got some of 
"Dean's" dills. 

27. "Floyd" and "Hutton" are some "Walkers" when they get a "Call." 

28. Stephen "Putney's" shoes "V/il-hoit." 

29. If a prof, quizzes you "Pickyourwits." 

30. Miscellaneous— "Simmon's" LIVER regulator, "Dudley's" slippers, 
"Stuart" Hall for girls, "Stoneburner's" roll books. Sears "Roebuck" & Co. 



The Satchel With the Strange Device m 




A medico lay on his downy couch, and his snores rose loud and clear; 
And a cherubic smile was on his face, for he dreamed he'd passed Senior year. 
Suddenly a telephone's jangling tune broke in on his dream so fine, 
And faintly he heard o'er the midnight wire the message "Q St. 2099." 
Then forth to the hospital went he, though the night wind bit like ice, 
For a satchel with that strange device : 
"Mem. Hosp." 

Wondrous late the hour was and the night was wondrous cold. 
When our hero with two others followed the Stork so old. 
A lonely "cop" on a dark side street looked on with suspicious eye. 
As like phantoms from the nether world three figures flitted by. 
But a smile came to the officer's face when they passed a lighted door. 
And he saw the sign the satchel bore : 
"Mem. Hosp." 

Old Sol with his slanting eastern beams was proclaiming another day. 
When forth from Richmond's devious streets came three medicos worn and gray. 
Their legs were stiff and tired and their eyes were heavy with sleep, 
And they wondered how at today's roll call they could manage awake to keep. 
And with them went that satchel red, though it shone with a coating of ice; 
That satchel with the strange device : 
"Mem. Hosp." 

Years afterward a gray-haired doctor sat musing in the evening glow ; 
And as memory's pages slowly turned a vision began to grow — 
He saw again the student trio, and his face was one of the three. 
And in his hand he held a satchel and it's legend he could see. 
Though dimmed by the mists of years, a message from the past it bore 
Of student life in the days of yore: 

"Mem. Hosp." — R. E. G. 



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Ye Battle of Crapton Halle 

RULY it hath been saide, that of ye makinge of bookes there 
is no ende. But I think it wise that some recorde be made 
of ye battle of Crapton Halle. Ande this that those genera- 
tions whiche are 3'ete to come maye knowe of ye proweresse 
and valiancy of theire forebeareres. 

It wase of a winter's morn. In the amphi-theatre or 
belowe Crapton Halle muche goode rede blood was being 
being sliede. Bute the heroes ande men of miglite were 
hegathered in a circle or ringe. 

Billie wase there, withe his partner-in-arms, Yclept David ; Marye, Knights 
of ye House of Stuarte, with Sir Bugge ; Mike ye Celt withe Guttes the 
Kedde; Izzy the Jew withe Croak the White-haired; while frome ye Northe 
wase come Bigge, the Giante. Tubbe ye Fatte wasei also in armour, with Slip- 
pers. Ande ye bardie sonne of ye Easte, Thomase, was with ye Duke. 
Finallie Windie, the page, withe muche blustering ande boasting. 

Heare nowe, ye crye of this troupe, as ye pee-wee, signifyeth theire posi- 
tions. Ye shouts of ye Duke as boxe cars roll up, withe the dire curses of 
ye David as Younge Joe doth appeare. Bute at laste ye Duke openethe up 
ye conflicte. Twentye ande five goode men ande. true he sendethe out. Withe 
mutterings ande defiances doth Billie meete him, while Guttes ye Redde ande 
Izzy ye Jewe dothe struggle on ye side. Billie at firste showethe fighte, ande 
delayethe ye conflicte, but at ye latter ende is utterly vanquished. 

Butte why telle of all ye strife? H9we Bigge ye Giant did demolish^ 
aye, even break Slippers, ande of howe Mike ye Celt did squeeze righte bravely 
and valiantlie on the arena floore to save his half hundred men. Of howe 
Phoebus, ande Elizabeth of ye ruffled breechen and Bigge Dickie did come 
and go. What artificer coulde depict ye race of eighty mile, alonge which 
many did persue Thomas ye Silente, or ye bitter struggle of Tubbe ye F'atte 
and Croak ye White-haired, or showe ye howe ye Bugge did silence Windie 
^^ ye page? At least not such a one am I. 

At laste ye struggle ceased. Ye sunne was about to sinke redde in ye 
western sky, and over alle ye plaine below wase silence. Only ye tinkling 
of little streamlets broke ye quiete of whate had so little time before beene 
cries of ye wounded, and shouts of ye victors. Slowly ye heroes depart, 
neither jibing at ye vanquished, nor railing at ye roughness of theire lucke. 

B. L. D. 



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A fly and a flea, a mosquito and a louse, 

All lived together in a very dirty house ; 
The flea spread the plague, the mosquito spread chills. 

And they all worked together to make doctors' bills. 

Dr. Pitt: "Mr. Cain, what is the oflice of the gastric juice?" 
Mr. Cain (sweetly) : "The stomach." 

IN THE EXTRACTING ROOM. 

Wagner (examining a few roots doomed for extraction) : "Will you 
have gas?" 

Miss X. : "Why certainly ; you don't suppose I am going to stay in this 
dark room alone with you." 

Dr. Moon : "Mr. Freeman, give me another name for Jaundice." 
Mr. Freeman : "Yellow Janders." 

Dr. Upshur: "Mr. Courtney, what is stomotitis?" 
Mr. Courtney: "Inflammation of the stomach." 

If Greer Baughman were to lose his position, would Johnny \A'in(n) ? 

Dr. Gray, lecturing to Sophmore Class, says : "I am afraid I'll omit some- 
thing, I am going so fast." 

Smith (to Hardin, who has been faithfully trying to raise a mustache ) : 
"Say, why don't you dye it?" 

Hardin : "I thought about that, but I don't think it necessary. It seems 
to be dying of its own accord." 

Goodwin (at Tragle's annual cut rate sale) : "Clerk what's the price of 
two cent stamps?" 

Dr. Henson : "What is the treatment of an abscess?" 
Williams (second dental) : "Artificial respiration." 

Did Freshman Brooks get excused from class the day he followed a street 
sprinkler nine blocks to tell the driver his barrel was leaking? 



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Cf)e J^map, 19X4 



Dr. M. : "What is lowered resistance?" 

Senior W. : "It is the same thing as muscular spasm." 

SUGGESTIONS FOR U. S. P. 

To add to the list of diaphoretics (at the suggestion of Mr. Carson) 
Dr. Can. 

As a cure for blues in the female sex : Dessicated extract of Tom Hardy. 




Dr. Call: "Mr. Carter, how do you spell your name?" 
The Honorable Duke: "Ca — Cat — No, sir; Cart — I don't beheve I 
know how." 




Fats Mears, coming from an opthomologist's office, sees a young lady 
waiting for a car and hastens to get closer. Alas ! he realizes that his accom- 
modation has been paralyzed. 

Consultation beside the cot of a patient: "I believe," said one surgeon, 
"that we should wait until he is stronger before cutting into him." 
Patient (feebly) : "W'hat do you take me for — a cheese?" 

IN TPIE DISSECTING HALL 

J. G. Smith : "Doctor, what disease caused this man's ankle to be eaten 
away ?" ; 

Dr. Christian : "Rats !" 

(F'reshmen should stop bringing cheese for lunch while in dissecting hall. 
It attracts too many germs.) 



Dr. Pitt: "What is a harmone?" 
. Freshman Porterfield : "Food passing through the intestinal tract caus- 
ing harmonious sounds."' 

If you have a new hat, don't put it on Dr. Winn's desk. You may have 
to get another after one of his demonstrations with it. 



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Ci)e I^map, 1914 



225 



Mr. BoLENBAUGH (discussing a prescription containing an overdose of 
morphia): "Hardin! Could you dispense this prescription and sleep well 
that night?" 

Hardin : "Not as well as the one who took it." 

If the Medical College was moved up to the Life Insurance Company 
of Virginia, maybe Laird and Nelson would attend classes more regularly. 



Ife 



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QuES. Why does Roebuck stand up during Dr. Dunn's class? 
Ans. Because of improper Fit(t)s. 

W'ARNING TO MIDDLE WEIGHT WRESTLERS. 
Mike Suiton and Nasty (does not refer to his friends in wrestling) have 
entered the ring. 



Five Hundred Dollars Reward to anyone devising an instrument for ex- 
tracting the grouch from Gloomy Gus Henkle. 

Nurse B. (who has just received a cake from a grateful patient) : "This 
cake contains fifty eggs." 

"Fuzzy" Thompson (who is pretty "fizzy") : "Why don't you borrow 
an incubator and set it?" 



Cozart has almost hit upon a plan for keeping the boys' feet off the 
amphitheatre railing. Many useful suggestions have been given by Dr. 
Johnston. 



Dr. Peple: "Mr. L., how is your patient getting on?" 

Mr. L. : "Fine; temperature, respiration and pulse normal." 

Dr. P.: "When was the last time you saw her?" 

Mr. L. : "Yesterday." 

Dr. P. : "That's strange — your patient died two days ago." 

Does anybody know the function of the Publication Board? 




Guess 



Who, when he lectures in the pit, 
To drive his point in harder, 

Refers with vim and jest sometimes, 
To "a case I had with my father"? 

Who uses English pure as gold — 

Who could talk a week on "nothing," 

Then says, "If you only knew a little, 
I could teach you something"? 

Who brags that the doors of M. C. V. 

Were not shut during the war. 
Which "turned out surgeons for the Army, 

The noblest the world ever saw"? 

Who talks with speed for minutes three 

About Arteriosclerosis, 
Says, "Nnow you know what ails this man. 

So write out your diagnosis"? 

Who bends and bows so politely 

That your eyes and ears may ache. 

But all the same he believes — 
"You are absent if you're late"? 

Who knows how to feed and treat 

The corning generation, 
Who gives Castor Oil and Calomel 

For almost every condition? 

Who is our human phagocyte 

For diseases of woman-kind, 
Who asks his patients to try 

Their doctor's face to find? 




Who can place beside his name 
A half dozen degrees worth while. 

While as a teacher of Pathology 
He lectures with modest smile? 

Who waves his glasses in, the air, 
Quotes Astley Cooper in his sleep; 

"As carcinoma is benign at first — 
Cut early, cut wide, cut deep"? 

Who combs his hair, and shuts his eyes, 

And stands upon a stool; 
"Gentleman, take your time, 

Or else you'll play the fool"? 

Who likes to loiter in the paths 

Of intricate skin affections — 
Then tells about his experiences 

In New York hospital reflections? 

Who can look into your eyes 

And find therein sheer joy — 
For did he not see a cataract 

Which makes him like a boy? 

Who knows the action of each drug 

In all its different phases — 
But when incompatibles are given 

He makes you see blue blazes? 

— W. N. Mercer, '14. 




Dr. Baughman : Feed the baby boiled water. 

Dr. Winn : Imitate Nature, gentlemen, take your time. 

Dr. Brown : I don't want to say anything over your heads. Look out 
for oedema and anasarca. 

Dr. Vanderhoof : Call the roll, please. 

Dr. Hodges : Don't forget to remember what I tell you, and you can 
make brilliant diagnose-es. 

Dr. Newton : From beginning to end give Castor Oil. 

Dr. Gordon : I have never seen the case before, but we'll ask him a few 
questions. 

Dr. LaRoque: "Feeble, rapid, running pulse; cold, clammy skin; dilated 
pupils ; subnormal temperature ; low blood pressure. Gentlemen, Shock !" 

Dr. McGavock : "A good book, an excellent book. When I was a resi- 
dent at the New York Skin and Cancer Hospital." 

Dr. Robins : "Lizzie, did you ever see these gentlemen before ? 

Dr. Brodnax : Gentlemen, you'll find it all in Gray. We'll now call the 
second roll. 

Dr. Hopkins: What's your name? What are you doing over there? 
Examine this. 

Dr. Wiggs : Gentlemen, I havq the floor. 

Dr. Shephard : Don't shave the time. 

Dr. Clifton Miller: Gentlemen, try to gather the pearls which fall from 
my lips. 

Prof. Rudd : This is the most important chapter in the book. Fight 
it out. 

Dr. Pitt: We'll put off the quiz till after the football game. 

Dr. Christian : Chris, bring me a knife and forceps. 

Dr. Call : Gentlemen, this is a case of cardio-vascular-renal disease. 

Dr. Henson : For heavens sake ! don't use a probe. 

Dr. White : Gill ! Where the h — is my roll book ? 

Dr. John Dunn: Come to order, please; knowledge comes, but wisdom 
lingers. 

Dr. Johnston : Put out that cigarette and keep your feet off the railing ! 

Dr. Whitfield : Yes ! you can answer it in two words — just put down 
"don't know." 




228 



CJjc I^Eap, 1914 



J 



Dr. Nelson : Bring out that percussion note better. Your technique 
is rotten. 

Dr. Tucker: Don't sa}' when you come to examination, "I never heard 
of that d — thing before. 

E. C. L. Miller : Diaminotrihydroxydodecanoic acid. 

Dr. Matthews : Now it's ship shape. Pay your money and take your 
choice. 

Dr. Bryan : Gentlemen, a long bone, and like other long bones, presents 
for examination a shaft and two extremities. 

Dr. Taylor: Primarily local, primarily curable. Cut early, cut wide, 
cut deep, cut through healthy tissue, cut on the ebb tide of the lymphatics. 

Dr. Upshur: If you combine calomel and soda in a prescription you 
flunk Materia Medica. 

Dr. Jones : Give him bicarbonate of soda and Vichy water — as a matter 
of fact, he'll get well anyway. 

Mr. McCracken : Ladies and gentlemen — a dextrosazon. 

Mr. Bolenbaugh: "Now, Class, we'll make a sirup." (Kiss your con- 
tingent fee good-bye.; 




:^^^5^^^^ 



Cl)e X'-nav, 1914 



'.zg 



A Trip Through the Human Body 




T W'AS a fine day in summer. Bili Rubin and Bili A'erdin 
closed up the Ol-factory and invited their ladv friends, Ethel 
Alcohol and Bella Donna to accompany them to the Islands 
of Langherhans to hear the great Trochanter speak on the 
Xavel question. Bili Rubin had procured before Hand a 
bundle of Eats, neatly tied with Spinal Cord, costing three 
Bones. Pso-as to get there quickly, they sailed down the 
Alimentary Canal to McBurney's Point in a Blood A^essel. 
On the way down Bili Rubin tried to make Bella Donna believe she was as 
Cutis Vera, but in \^ein. She told him he had too much Nerve and Gall, 
and to be careful or the Recurrent Tibial would swamp them. Tym-panic 
had sailed there before, and the Recurrent Tibial had Rectum on the shores 
of Gall. Poor Sole! They went from the Alimentary Canal into Hunter's 
Canal. Ethyl Alcohol was reading a very Humerus book entitled "On the 
Trail of the Lonesome Spine," by Mic-Robe. Bili A'erdin remarked that he 
was Green at sailing, but was not as Yellow as Bili Rubin. At the end of 
Hunter's Canal the "bunch" left the Vessel in the hands of Art-ery to get 
some Col-on board. They crossed to the Islands of Langherhans on Foot 
via the Pons Varolii. Within a Radius of half a mile they could see flocks 
of Ducts. The Ducts of Lieberklilin, floating on Peristaltic Waves. On 
reaching the island, lunch was served beneath a Shed of Tears, away from 
the Solar Rays. Here was served Cold Shoulder and Plot Tongue on Flatlets 
of Wharton's Jelly, the \\"hite Substance of Swan, with Heart Beat salad. 

After lunch Bili Rubin strolled off to get some of Adam's Apples, while 
tlie rest of the Body picked Berries in Peyer's Patches. They thought they 
could hear the Eye-ball and the Verte-brae and were much frightened. How- 
ever, by taking a Glisson's Capsule they became quite Sternum. The noise 
they heard, however, was the music from the Ilio-Tibial Band marching along 
the Spiral Line to Meat the great Trochanter, who was coming to the island 
in a Lymph Vessel, decorated with Two-lips, and propelled by the Oculo- 
motor. The great Trochanter, having pointed out the \'as Deferens between 
the two Navel policies, told about his Tryps-in the Teres Minor, with Sar- 
torius ; he also told about the Pacchionian Bodies buried in the Pyramids of 



m 








Malpighi and the Temple built in the region of Gluteus Maximus. The proceed- 
ings were much interrupted by Rolando and Sylvius, Fissures by trade, who 
had been down to Glen-oid, a tough Joint, and got "stewed." They had their 
Cheek all right. 

The Nerve of Bell was shown when he looped the Loops of Henle. 
Some Feet, I assure you. Some of the people rode Bronchi up and down 
the race Tracts of Goll and Burdach; others watched the Ce-cum in on the 
shore. The children enjoyed the Cytes (Leuko and Lymplio) and made their 
Pa-tell-a story to them. After consulting the Auricles of the Heart they 
all went home. At present Bili Verdin is in the Central Acini Cells, break- 
ing Gall Stones for insulting the Great Omentum. Now, concerning poor 
Bili Rubin — alas ! alas ! he Tryps-in the Ol-factory and loses his Toes. It 
must be terrible to Lac-tose. Amen. 

— Selected. 




^^^^^^^ 




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232 



Ci)e J^Eap, 1914 



^^ 




Hospital Corps 

First Regiment Infantry, Virginia Volunteers 

HE Hospital Corps of the First Regiment, Infantry, Virginia 
Volunteers, consisting entirely of men engaged in the prac- 
tice or study, of medicine, is the only one of its kind in the 
United States. 

Its officers are connected with the teaching staff, and 
the enlisted men with the student body of the Medical College 
of Virginia. Major J. Fulmer Bright, the commanding officer, 
— j " holds an honorable position as Emeritus Professor of Anat- 
omy. Captain Giles B. Cook, instructor in medicine, is at present engaged 
in forming the most important adjunct of the State militia — the first field 
hospital in Virginia, a well equipped, complete and transportable hospital 
under canvas. Captain A. A. MarsteUer, instructor in Neurology and Psychi- 
atry, and First Lieutenant Harry F. White, of Staunton, complete the staif. 
The prerequisite for enlistment in the corps is competency on the part of the 
student in his medical studies. The character of the men is well demon- 
strated by the fact that, at the last United States Government inspection a 
record of 1 00 per cent was attained. ■ 

,vn'--=:r'l Thanks to the ceaseless eft'orts of Major Lawrence T. Price, the com- 

0!}jp=^ mand is now quartered in the most complete and modern armory in the 
South. At present the corps is up to its maximum strength with a waiting list. 



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Cbe J'JRap, 1914 



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Roster of Hospital Corps 

Major J. Fulmer Bright Richmond, Va. 

Captain Giles B. Cook Richmond, Va. 

Captain Alepfar A. Marsteller Richmond, Va. 

First Lieutenant Harry F. White Fishersville, Va. 

Sergeant (First Class) William B. Trower Eastville, Va. 

Sergeant and Quartermaster W. Nelson Mercer Richmond, Va. 

Sergeant James B. Anderson Roseland, Va. 

First Corporal Eugene P. Cox Ward, Va. 

Second Corporal James W. Hannabass Kennett, Va. 

Private Edwin M. Corns Gate City, Va. 

Private Paul Davis Roanoke, Va. 

Priavte Elmore S. Deane Fletchers, Va. 

Private Grover B. Gill Avalon, Va. 

Private John H. Hoskins Dennisville, Va. 

Private James L. Hamner Amelia, Va, 

Private John E. Hamner Amelia, Va, 

Private Carroll H. Iden , Bluemont, Va, 

Private Earl G. Johnson Narrows, Va, 

Private Marcellus A. Johnson Roanoke, Va, 

Private Harry E. Lee Hanover, Va, 

Private Vance P. Peery Glade Springs, Va, 

Private Wayne M. Phipps Independence, Va 

Private W. O. Poindexter Goode, Va 

Private G. Garland Rhudy Wytheville, Va 

Private J. Thomas P. Sharpley Franklin City, Va 

Private Stuart D. Scott Monroe, Va 

Private Marshall W. Sinclair Hampton, Va 

Private William T. Varn Walkerton, Va 





The Pharmaceutical Association 



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HE Pharmaceutical Association of the Medical College of 
Virginia has the proud distinction of being the only student 
association in the college organized for the purpose of in- 
creasing interest in the work of the College and creating a 
bond of closer fellowship among the members of the student 
body. 

The Association has been in existence for five years. 
During the session 1908-9, a small group of students of the 
Department of Pharmacy of the University College of Medicine met together 
and formed the nucleus of the present body. The merger of the two' schools 
gave to the present institution no more worthy heritage than the Pharma- 
ceutical Association. 

The Association is strictly a student affair. Members of the Faculty 
have mentbership, but no special privileges are accorded them. 

The meetings are held bi-monthly during the session. The program is 
made up of papers, reviews, discussions, quizzes and debates on subjects of 
general interest to pharmacists. The meetings offer opportunity for acquainl^- 
ance with the many problems of ethical and commercial character incident 
to the practice of pharmacy. No training in the college curriculum is com- 
parable to that received by those who take active part in these meetings, 
where the spirit of organization is emphasized, and the essentials of leader- 
ship developed. 

Members having a good record of attendance and activity receive, at the 
close of the session, a certificate of distinction. 

The membership has planned to visit the manufacturers of pharmaceuti- 
cals in Baltimore during the latter part of the session. It is hoped that side 
trips of this character may be made an annual feature. 




236 



Cl)e laiap, 1914 



Pharmaceutical Association Officers 

Hardin, E. M President 

Harlow, C. B First Vice-President 

Hoover, W. H., Jr Second Vice-President 

Fray, J- H. Secretary and Treasurer 

ROLL. 



Seniors. 



Armentrout, L. W Virginia 

Berlin, E. P Virginia 

Chung, C. P China 

Haley, H. T Virginia 

Hardin, E. M. North Carolina 

Harlow, C. B Virginia 

Hawkins, R. K Virginia 

Holland J. B Virginia 



Jackson, C. G Virginia 

Miller, R. L North Carolina 

Morrow, E West Virginia 

Parkins, S. H Virginia 

Smith. F. B Oklahoma 

Smith. W. R Virginia 

Strole, W. E Virginia 

Whitley. J. H. North Carolina 



Juniors. 






Brown, B. B Virginia 

Booth, R. P Virginia 

Cole, W. E Virginia 

Davenport, J. G Virginia 

Earles, G. W Virginia 

Ellington, G. R North Carolina 

Fray, J. H Virginia 

Friddle, A. E West Virginia 

Hale, B. C West Virginia 

Henderson, D. B North Carolina 

Henly, L. J Virginia 

Hisey, H. C Virginia 

Hoover, W. H.. Jr Virginia 

Hopkins, W. B Virginia 

Kritzer, E. L North Carolina 



Tarner. F Illinois 

Lewter. J. O Virginia 

Moseley. R. T., Jr Virginia 

Murrah, T. A South Carolina 

Murrill, J. K North Carolina 

Quillen. J. W Virginia 

Saunders, E. I Virginia 

Shirkey. H. G Virginia 

Sisstm, V. E Virginia 

Sutton, J. L North Carolina 

Thomas, F. W Virginia 

Turner. L. W Virginia 

Van Pelt, W. T Virginia 

Young, T. L North Carolina 

Zirkle, H. W Mrginia 






^ 



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Deeree Men's Club 

OFFICERS. 

President H. G. Carter 

Vice-President C. B. Ransone 

Secretary S. S. Cook 

Treasurer R. E. Watkins 

MOTTO : Mens sana in corpore sano. 

MEMBERS. 

Seniors. 

Stoneburner, L. T B. S., Washington and Lee 

Polices, W. B • • B. A., Washington and Lee 

Dudley, W. B • • • B. A., Washington and Lee 

Sinton, A. C B. A., Richmond College 

Fitz, Blair • • • B. A., Hampden Sidney 

Cata, E. G • • B. A., University of Michigan 

Goodwin, E. LeB , B. S., WilHam and Mary 

Glass, R. E B. S., Stetson University, and B. S., University of Chicago 

Walkup, H. A B. S., University of West Virginia 

Carter, H. G • A. B., William and Mary 

Juniors. 

Yohannon, J. I B. A., Davidson College 

Ransone, C. B B. A., William and Mary 

Stoneburner, R. W B. A., Randolph-Macon 

Brugh, B. F B. A., Roanoke College 

McGuire, John • • B. A., Emory and Henry 

Cox, E. P B. A., Emory and Henry 

Moore, M. A B. A., Washington and Lee 

Junkins, G. G ■. B. A., Hampden-Sidney 




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Cf)e ^e^Eap, 1914 



^39 



Sophomores. 

Flinchman, H B. A., Rock Hill College 

Smith, P. S B. A., Fredericksburg College 

Watkins, R. E B. S., Davidson 

Cook, S. S • ■ . • • B. A., Richmond College 

Philips, Chas B. A., Richmond College 

Ransone, A. T B. A., Richmond College 

Ralston, G. H • • . • • B. A., Washington and Lee 

Clark, D. D B. S., Davidson 

Fitts, F. M M. A., B. A., Hampden-Sidney 

Graham, C. F" B. A., Hampden-Sidney 

Gilmer, W. P B. A., Hampden-Sidney 

Robertson, P. A • • . ■ • Ph. B., Virginia Christian College 

Hughston, C. F B. A., Wofford College 




Freshmen. 

Wine, J. E B. E., Bridgewater College 

Royster, J. H M. A., B. A., University of North Carolina 

Coffindaffer, C. C B. Ped., Salem College 

Turner, H. C B .A., Fredericksburg College 

Harwood, J. M B. A., Richmond College 

Suiter, W. G B. A., Trinity College (N. C.) 

Williams, S. D B. A., Fredericksburg College 

Northington, P. O B. A., Hampden-Sidney 

Whaley, H. E B. A., Hampden-Sidney 




t40 



&t X'Mav, 1914 



^^•' 



Masonic Club 

President S. B. Perry 

J'ke-President J. W. Hannabass 

Secretary and Treasurer F. X. Schuler 

Seniors. 

R. C. Barrett K- F. Hamilton 

E. L. Deane J- W. Hannabass 

M. P. Dillard J. C. Walker 

S. B. Perry J. B. Walker 
E. L. Flannagan 

Juniors. 
L. L. Hollenbeck W. B. Trower 

R. H. Peake F. X. Schuler 

C. B. Parker 

Sophomores. 
C. D. Allen E. S. Barr 

J'^RESHMEN. 

E. S. Brake PL L- Large 

W. A. Morgan ' F. O. Summers 

R. F. Thornhill 

Dental. 
J. A. Alexander R. F. Barr 

N. T. Ballou 

Pl-IARM.NCY. 
H. T. Halley E. W. Morrow 



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Cfte J^map, 1914 



^ 



North Carolina Club History 

N February nth a crowd of we "Tarheel" boys 
got together and reorganized, for the year 1914, 

^LJSwKn W/ '•^^^ North CaroHna Club. 

W\~\Gra/r /Mi 'pi^g election of officers came up. Hamlin 

was chosen to be our guide; Bynum to be our 
Vice-President; Wilson to keep the records and 
to hold the "wallet" ; Martin as Poet, and Parker 
Historian. 

We are proud of our club, but still prouder of the State 
it represents. In our club we have some of the most promi- 
nent men of the Medical College of Virginia. The presidents of 
the student body and Senior class are Tarheels. We are also 
|)roud to see the names of Doctors Baughman, Hodges, Tucker, 
Wiggs, and LaRoque, all of whom are among the foremost in 
the profession, as membefs of our Faculty, who hail formerly 
from the Old North State. 

Historian. 




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Cl)e I'laap, 1914 



243 



Roll of North Carolina Club 

F. E. Hamlin President 

T. H. Wilson Secretary-Treasurer 



Alexander, J. A. 
Barnes, V. M. 
Barr, R. F. 
Bell, B. J. 
Bingham 
Blalock, J. A. 
Bowdoin, G. E. 
Bowman, E. L. 
Boyette, W. T. 
Braswell, J. C. 
Brooks, H. E. 
Brower, J. W. 
Bullock, J. H. 
Butler, L. J. 
Bynum, C. M. 
Clark, D. D. 
Cozart, W. S. 
Grumpier, L. O. 
Grutchfield, J. G. 
Davis, R. B. 
Dixon, G. G. 
Duvall, T. F. 
Edwards, C. J. 
Emmette, J. M. 
Freeman, J. D. 



Futrelle, L. M. 
Gaskins, V. B. 
Granger, W. S. 
Hamlin, F. E. 
Hardin, E. M. 
Harward, P. C. 
Hedgepeth, H. M. 
Henderson, J. P. 
Hester, J. R. 
Jennings, C. W. 
Jones, B. N. 
Keel, D. F. 
Keel, H. L. 
Kritzer, E. L. 
Martin, J. A. 
Meyer, W. 
Moore, B. D. 
Morgan, W. A. 
McAnnally, W. T. 
McCleese, E. C. 
McCleese, J. E. 
McCuiston, C. M. 
Murrill, J. K. 
Norfleet, E. P. 



Parker, C. P. 
Perry, S. B. 
Pitman, E. E. 
Porter, G. E. 
Ray, C. W. 
Ray, R. C. 
Roebuck, C. T. 
Royster, J. H. 
Smith, Joe 
Spencer, J. S. 
Suiter, W. G. 
Sutton, J. L. 
Taylor, J. C. 
Thomas, J. G. 
Thomas, W. C. 
Thompson, W. 
Wagoner, W. G. 
Walker, J. B. 
Wilkinson, R. W 
Willis, W. M. 
Wilson, T. H. 
Wolfe, H. C. 
Woodard, G. B. 
Wyatt, H. L. 
Yates, O. R. 



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246 



Cf)e I=lRap, 1914 




The South Carolina Club 

"These tropic veins still oivn their kindred heat, 
And thoughts of thee my cherished State are siveet." 
— Paul Hamilton Hayne. 

HE South Carolina Club was organized in February, 1914, 
and the following officers were elected: Mr. J. G. Smith, 
President; Mr. W. B. Brigman, Vice-President; Mr. G. F. 
Hughston, Secretary and Treasurer, and Mr. C. I. Sease, 
Historian. 

The purpose of our organization is to afford a closer 
fellowship with each other ; to promote the spirit of endeavor, 
and of good feeling among our fellow-students and the 
Faculty, and to win an honorable place in their esteem. Moreover, it is our 
desire to make and maintain a good record as students of the Medical College 
of Virginia. 

We represent ten diiiferent counties of the Palmetto State — coming from 
the rolling, fertile plains of Anderson, Chester and Spartanburg, and the 
sunny dales and shady brooks of Richmond, Newberry and Barnwell ; we come 
from Lancaster, the home of the great gynecologist, J. Marion Sims, and from 
the broad and level plantations of Marlboro ; from the miniature lakes of 
Aiken, where the peaceful solitude is broken only by the sirens of the cotton 
mills, and the occasional firing of the duck hunter's gun; from old historic 
Charleston, bearing proudly the battle scars of '76 and '61, caressed by the 
gentle breeze of the Atlantic laden with the fragrance of the sweet magnolia. 
To these peaceful scenes we hope soon to return, for though among 
friends in old Virginia, we are drawn toward our native State, where loved 
ones loyal and true are waiting to greet us, and there 

"A little while we fain would linger yet, 
A little while till night and twilight meet." 
Faculty Members. 

C. C. Haskell, B. A., M. D Columbia 

Robert F. McCrackan, B. S., A. M Langley 

Junior Class. 

Smith Williston C. I. Sease Prosperity 

Sophomore Class. 

Boldridge Lancaster H. ■ B. Thomas Chester 

B. Brigman Bennettsville W. B. Williams Kershaw 

G. F. Hughston Spartanburg J. J. Spencer Charleston 

W. V. Kay Anderson 



J. G. 

F. M 
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Ci)e X'Mav, 1914 






Southwest Virginia Club 

"A zvorld of strife shut out, 
And a zvorld of love shut in." 

^UR CLUB need offer no excuse for its existence — justification 
lies in the fact that there is a kindly sympathetic chord in 
the heart of all who hail from the Blue Ridge Mountains 
of \'irginia. Perhaps we did not meet on "The Trail of the 
Lonesome Pine," but as time and again we have climbed that 
trail and the trails of the mill-folk stories and on beyond 
to the sunset and the dizzy horizon, we have felt the throb 
that makes us brothers at heart. What more natural than 
an outward manifestation of that which Nature has previously created. 
Nature has branded us as mountaineers, and mountaineers we will always be 
when in the melting pot. 

In the session of '13 our club was formed at the Medical College of 
\''irginia, and has this year been reorganized with unbounded enthusiasm. 
C. V. Cox was chosen President, and with the help of our genial friend, 
T. B. Williams, is leading us amiably. Our tall Hillsvillian, J. W. Tipton, 
was elected Secretary, while W. M. Phipps, from Independence, was elected 
as Treasurer. When it developed that a Sergeant-at-Arms was needed, there 
was no question but that Mr. Fred Sutherland was the proper man. Mr. 
Remine, on account of his decorous behavior, was chosen as Chaplain, while 
Mr. J. B. Haller's work as Artist need not be lauded by us since several of 
his cartoons appear in this volume. And ,if you will pardon the club for its 
selection of M. A. Johnson as Historian, we may tell you that we are right- 
fully proud of our leaders. 

: Among our members we can claim class officers, those who are prominent 
in the politics of our student body and in social affairs. We are well repre- 
sented on the gridiron and diamond, and have made a good showing in every 
pkrt of college life. 

Our life profession has been chosen to serve the world in the greatest 
^yay — so we are content to abide our time here at M. C. Y., but there is a 
ceaseless longing and calling for the quiet happiness of our native mountains 
that a busy city life cannot satisfy. We see the orchards and fields loom up 
in their unsurpassed beauty and productiveness ,and we see the cherished 
farm place again. " 'Tis distance lends enchantment to the view." 

Historian. 






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250 



Ci)e I*map, 1914 



The Southwest Virginia Club 



Officers. 

E. P. Cox Presiden 

J. B. Williams • Vice-President 

J. W. Tipton .■ • ■ • ■ ■ Secretary 

W. M. Phipps • . . • ■ Treasurer 

M. A. Johnson, Je Historian 

W. H. Remine Chaplain 

F. P. Sutherland ■ ■ Sergeant at Arms 

J. B. Haller • ■ • Artist 






Members. 




C. D. Allen 


J. B. Haller 


J. W. Quillen 


C. S. Anderson 


R. K. Hawkins 


C. H. Rangeley 


E. R. Altizer 


F. B. Hutton, Jr. 


M. G. Rock 


B. B. Brown 


H. T. Haley 


W. H. Remine 


B. F. Brugh 


E. C. Harper 


A. B. Rucker 


W. W. Baldwin 


M. A. Johnson, Jr. 


G. G. Rhtidy 


E. P. Cox 


G. B. Kenny 


B. E. Rhndy 


J. E. Clark 


H. Lee Large 


F. B. Stafford 


G. 0. Crank 


W. L Laughon' 


F. P. Sutherland 


D. B. Cole 


B. B. Jones 


E. S. Sheppard 


W. P. Davis 


J. B. Muncy 


C. E. Stump 


G. B. Davidson 


P. J. Muncy 


J. T. Shelburne 


Paul Davis 


W. W. McChesney 


V. E. Sissow 


C. F. Graham 


J. T. Neel 


J. W. Tipton 


W. P. Gilmer 


W. 0. Poindexter 


F. W. Thomas 


A. J. Goodwin 


J. C. Phipps 


J. B. Williams 


E. A. Hoge, Jr. 


W. M. Phipps 


Glenn Weiss 


J. W. Hannabass 


H. B. Poterfield 






Cl)e I^map, 1914 



251 



Dill Pickers Club 





Grand Mogul ■ • • Thompson 

Past Grand Master • ••...". Deane 

Holder of the Royal Basket ■ ■ • Roebuck 

Chief Ringer and Registrar • Urbach 

Would-Be Ringer ■ • • Bennett 

Shaker of the Royal Bush ■ • • "Babe" Parker 

Gatherer of the Ripe Ones- ■ Brooks 

Picker of the Little Ones. . . ■ ■ • ■ • Byrd 

Collector of Beautiful Specimens • • Hardin 

Chief Hai'vester • • Stearne 

Them As Wants 'Em ■ • Student Body 



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Cfte I^iaap, 1914 




History of Married Men's Club 

O XOT expect too much information from the Club History, 
as we cannot allow all the particulars regarding its organi- 
zation to be known. However, one of the principal reasons 
for its organization was to have an ever ready excuse for 
the members to give to their wives. We no longer fear 
meeting rolling pins upon our return home at night, nor do 
we take off our shoes and creep in, for a smiling wife awaits 
our return. The reason for this, and you must promise 
never to tell a soul, is that we have let it be known that we receive lectures 
on "Domestic Science" at our meetings, with the intention of applying our 
knowledge later on. 

AVe also expect to organize a "Baby Carriage Brigade" for the fathers 
later on, as it will be such nice exercise these Spring and Summer afternoons 
and evenings. 

As a matter of fact, our membership is somewhat limited, as only real 
"bona fide" married men are eligible, but we have prospects for a larger 
membership next year, judging from that "far away expression" we see on 
some faces about College. 

The Club is supposed to hold meetings any night that one of its mem- 
bers wishes to go "up town" with the boys. 

[Signed] W. S. Granger, Historian. 




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''The Tied" 



253 





OFFICERS. 

President Dalton 

J'ice President Urbach 

Secretary Mason 

Treasurer Allen 

Historian Granger 

Chaplain Long 

Prophet Hamilton 

Sergeant at Anns Horton 

AIembers. 

Geo. Wm. Parrott, Charlottesville, Va. G. A. Smith, Dothan, W. Va. 

Emmie Lucile Watkins, Richmond, Va. Corda E. Hickel, Ripley, W. Va. 

Married. Richmond, Va,. Aug. 17. 1909. Married, Cafleftsburg. Ky.. Sept. 3. 1912. 

J. R. Hamilton, Los Angeles, Gal. R. Lawrence Mason, Bridgewater, Va. 

Lola Cox, Meldrin, Ga. M. Ethel Morris, San Marcos, Tex. 

Married, Richmond, Va.. Jan. 19, 191 1. Married. San Marcos, Tex.. Jan. 4, 1914- 

Howard Urbach, Richmond, Va. R. F. J. Hamilton, Portsmouth, Va. 

Rosalind Jennings, Richmond, Va. Lillian L. Altecamp, Portsmouth, Va. 

Married, Grace Episcopal Church, Married, Trinity Church, 

Richmond, Va., March 9, 1910. Portsmouth, Va., June 5, 1909. 

Luigi D. Di Stefino, Baltimore, Md. Gary D. Allen, White Gate, Va. 

Sadie Maggio, Baltimore, Md. Winnie Ray Burkhalter, Kennett, Mo. 

Married, St. Leo Church. Married, Virginia Intermont College, 

Baltimore, Md., July 3, 1910. Bristol, Va., August 27, 1913- 

Heath A. Dalton, Hillsville, Va. Howard M. Horton, Wakefield, N. C. 

Hattie B. Burnette, Willis, Va. Ethel Augusta Leftwich, Roanoke, Va. 

Married. Washington, D. C, Sept. 27, '13. Married, Roanoke, Va.. Dec. 28, 1912. 

. Mason B. Caldwell, Athens, W. Va. Clyde W. Irvin, Fall Branch, Tenn. 

Elsie E. White,- Oaknole, W. Va. Lelia E. Broach, Broach, Va. 

Married. Bristol, Tenn.. Sept. 3, 1910. Married. Richmond. Va.. July 12, 1913- 

G P. Parker, Jackson, N. C. Clavius Clyde Coffindaffer, 

Bertha Joyner, Jackson, N. C. Jane Lew, W. \ a. 

Married. Conway. N. C. Sept. 5, 1913- Bessie Ethel Law, Jane Lew, W. \ a. _ 

William Spicer Granger, Goldsboro, N. C. Married. Jane Lew. W. Va.. June 16, 09. 

Myrtle Hiati Blaylock, Greensboro, N. C. John C. Phipps, Independence, \ a. 

Married, Greensboro, N. C. Feb. 7. 1912. Ethel Lee Moore, Pulaski, \ a. 

W. Harry Long, Covington, Va. Married, Pulaski, Va., Dee. 31, 1908. 

L. Josephine Fix, Greenville, Va. Lewis T. Stoneburner, Edmburg, Va. 

Married. Staunton, Va., Dec. 21, 1913. Clara Gresham Smith, Kmg and Queen, \' a. 

Nathaniel Talley Ballou, Houston, Va. Married, Newport News, Va., 

Annie John Ballou, Houston, Va. -^""^ 12, 1912. 
Married, Houston, Va., Sept. 24, 1902. 







p^^^^^?^^^^ 



254 



Ci)e J^map, 1914 



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Our Orchestra 



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N ORCHESTRA is an organization for making a 
fuss by putting the air into a more or less liar- 
nionious series of waves. It consists of many 
parts, eacli part being presided over by a young 
Doc. 

The leader is Tubby Herndon, presiding at 
the piano, but he deserves no more blame than 
the rest. Pussy and Ralston blow the cornet at 
intervals, while Moylan Fitts and Hoag, aided and abetted by 
Tucker and Sease, worry the violins. Hoge and Blair Fitts hold 
down the base end, the former with a trombone ,the latter with 
what is technically known as a cello, though better known by a 
more familiar name in our musical circle. 

The story that Dr. Winn handed in a birth certificate after 
passing 313 East Grace during practice hours has never been 
authenticated. 

After a few hours' practice and much encouragement from 
innocent bystanders, the orchestra can really play quite well, so 
that most of the pieces can be recognized, even if the names 
have not been previously announced. 

At present the orchestra is hard at work on "The Dead 
March" from "Saul," which will be feelingly rendered on gradu- 
ation night. May our Orchestra live long and flourish ! 



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Cf)e I*map, 1914 



255 



Gray's Anatomy 

(Any Edition) 

Mister Freshman, in your glory 
Hacking stiffs, all wet and gory. 

Listen, pray, to what an old man has to say — 
While it's ligaments and such 
Don't roll the bones too much; 

Sit on your os innom, and study Gray. 

You conceited little Soph, 
Knowing more than any Prof, 

It's hardly possible that this advice will stay. 
For tho' you're awfully bright, 
And have your dills all sewed up tight, 

You'd better cut the booze, and bone old Gray. 



Il^:^^- 




Poor old Junior, they will work you. 
Not a man amongst them shirk you, 

While they pile the work upon you night and day. 
Don't you let them get your goat, 
Just shuffle off your old blue coat, 

And when in doubt — just look it up in Gray. 

Yes, Senior, with your tremors 
And oscillating femurs 

Does a blank and yawning flunk your dream portray; 
Doc, take a hunch from me 
And p. c, t. i. d. 

Get down your good old friend, and study Gray. 

Brother Big Man, when your cases 
In your hair have left their traces. 

And at last one comes to fill you with dismay ; 
When your experts all have failed you. 
And the fears of Death assailed you. 

Cheer up. Reach up. You'll find it all in Gray. 




L'Envoi. 
So when before the Pearly Gates we stand 

And wonder what the right thing is to say 
To pass those Golden Bars — think hard. 
Then pass, for it is somewhere writ in Gray. 

— B. 



Z. D. 



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Ci)e I:=iaap, 1914 



The Family Doctor 




A sound of galloping hoofs by night, 
A message from those in pain ; 

A hurried hitching by lantern light, 
And a wild dash through the rain. 



No matter if the journey be rough 

And thy tired body longs for rest ; 
There are those who need thee — that's enough. 

Thou must needs do thy best. 

For anguished eyes are watching for thee 

When pain racks those most dear. 
How unbounded is their faith in thee ! 

And what confidence when you're near ! 

Fighting, amid bad surrounding, mankind's deadlj' foe, 
Ministering at Life's dawning and at its close ; 

Working, unassisted, as the life spark flickers low. 
Vigilant, always, till the dread Angel goes. 

Adviser to thy people, counsellor unafraid. 
Bearer of secrets that only thou must know 

Better and saner living, than has made 

For Posterity, wlien thy time has coir.e to go. 

— R. F. G. 



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Cfje J=Ilap, 1914 



Cfje f aap 



"'CftiS f =l!lap macfjine is! a marbcl,, 
^aib a JPcbical man to i)i& fricnti; 

3lt is! s!f)otoins up manp a tnonbcr. 
Mnh sicrbing a migfjtp goob cnb. 

Hasit toecfe 3 cxamineb a puppp — 

gou fenotD ftoto tf)cp bang out tijeir tongucsi. 
JuBit a plain cbcrpbap feinb of boggic; 

31 took a goob look at fjisi lungsi. 

Hnb bjfjcn J bcbelopcb tlje picture — 

^oto bon't tell pour sisters! anb aunts 

ifor it sounbs juSt a little bit sljocking— 
31 biscobcreb tlje seat of fjis pants!" 



n 




K^CvpfefjAa^-, 



Medical College 
Of Virmnia 



(State Institution) 



Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy 



New buildings ; well-equipped laboratories under the direction of 
full time competent teachers. 

The Memorial Hospital, with 150 beds, is owned and controlled 
by the Medical College of Virginia, and offers every facility for 
thorough clinical teaching. 

Staff composed of the Faculty of the College. 

Additional clinical facilities in other institutions of the City of 
Richmond. ' 



For full information and catalogue^ address 

J. R. McCAULEY, Secretary, 

Richmond, Virginia. 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 U 1 1 1 i.m,| H ! 



The 



JOHNSTON- WILLIS 

SANATORIUM 



Wmi 





Richmond, Virginia 

Geo. Ben Johnston, M. D. A. Murat Willis, M. D. 

A New and Thoroughly Equipped Private Institution 

For the treatment of 

Surgical and Medical Diseases 

No Contagious Nor Colored Patients 



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Stuart Circle Hospital 

Moni/me/U A -venue and LoTnhardy Street 




Fireproof Construction. 

Enclosed and Open Roof Gardens. 

Quiet Residential Location. 

Large Number Front Rooms. 

Magniticent View Monument Avenue. 



Staff : 



Surgery — ■ 

Lewis C. Bosher, M. D. 
Chas. R. Robins, M. D. 

Medicine — • 

Ro. S. Bosher, Jr., M. D. 
Manford Call, M. D. 

Ear, Eye. Nose and Throat — 
Clifton M. Miller, M. D. 
R. H. Wright, M. D. 



Obstetrics — '■ 

Greer Baughman, M. D. 

Department of Roentgeology — 
A. L. Gray, M. D., Director 

Department of Pathology — ■ 
A. C. Broders, Director 
.W. A. Shepherd, Consultant 

Superintendent — ■ 

R. Z. Van Nort, R. N. 



U,, 





St Luke's Hospital 



Owned and personally conducted by Dr. Stuart McGuire for the ex- 
clusive use of his private patients. 

Building erected for the purpose to which it is devoted, and combines 
the comforts of a home with the conveniences of a modern hospital. 

Located in the residential section, convenient to all parts of the city by 
means of the street car service. 




DR. STUART McGUIRE'S PRIVATE 
SANITORIUM 

Capacity for eighty patients. Single and double bedrooms, with or with- 
out bath. No wards. 

Designed for surgical and gynecological cases. No contagious diseases, 
insane or colored patients received. 

Cost of board and nursing and other information may be obtained by 
addressing the Secretary. 



r RICHMOND, VIRGINIA ^ 



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St. Elizabeth's Hospital 

61;^ W. GRACE STREET 
Richmond, Virginia 




A thoroughly equipped and modern private hospital for surgical and 
gynecological patients. Absolutely fireproof — a desirable requirement in any 
building, but a necessity in a surgical hospital. Constructed of tapestry brick, 
Pennsylvania brown stone, and reinforced concrete. Location is excellent, 
very quiet but accessible. The building is half a block from the Franklin 
Street side of Monroe Park. Ventilation perfect — due to general design of 
architect who is an authority on ventilation, and also to the patent Austral 
windows, which direct the air current towards the ceiling and not on the 
patient. 

Only graduate nurses are employed. 

All modern conveniences, such as silent electric light signals for patients, 
vacuum cleaners built in the wall and long distance telephone connections in 
every room. 

Two large and complete operating rooms with northern light are on the 
top floor, where they are practically free from dust. The hospital is open 
the entire year. No wards, only single or double rooms, with or without 
private bath. Rates, $2.50 per day and up. 

A limited number of graduate nurses received for post-graduate instruction. 

SUPERINTENDENT 
MISS JOSEPHINE McLEOD, A. B. 

Graduate Nttrse of John Hopkin's Hospital. 

J. SH ELTON HORSLEY M. D. 

SURGEON IN CHARGE 







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UJV'JiliVllJUJ^: 



401-5 West Grace Street 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



GRACE HOSPITAL i 



A Modern Fire-Proof Surgical Hospital for the Pri\)ate Patients of 
N DR. H. STUART MacLEAN - DR. BOBERT C. BRYAN 





The building is of Stone, briclc, concrete and steel construction. Has sound-proof walls, 
inside, fire-proof stairway, silent electric nurses' signals, long distance telephone, hot and cold 
water in every room. Perfect ventilation and the building completely furnished with weather 
stripping, double shades, wire screens and awnings. Every convenience for the comfort of 
patients. Single and double rooms and private rooms with bath. Rates: $2.00 per day and 
upward. 

For further information, app^ to eitner of the above, or 

MISS W. W. ATKINSON, R. N. 



Wsi 





mm B3?rd Press 

(Incorporated) 

10 S. 14th St., Richmonci, Va. 









WE are prepared to execute orders for 
Artistic Printing whicK will command 
attention b}? its striking and original 
Advertising Features. Our greatest efforts are 
al^^a37s made to maintain tKe printer's KigKest 
and best standards of excellence. 

COur select TYPE EQUIPMENT is being constantly) 
augmented Lj) tke new and latest faces. If you desire 
color combinations and arrangements of tKe most attract- 
vOe character, our services are alwa3)s at 3)our instant dis- 
posal. We will be pleased to call upon request. 



Professional Stationery) for Professional Men 



We Printed tKis, tKe ad issue of 

"The X-Raj)" 

It is a Fair Specimen of Our Work 





JAS. K. Hall, M. D. Paul V. Anderson, M. D. E. M. Gayle, M. D. 

t©e^ttiroDfe .Sanatorium 



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The magnificent suburban home of the late Major Ginter, by alterations 
and extensive additions, has been transformed into a private institution for the 
treatment of nervous diseases, mild mental cases, and select alcoholic and 
drug habitues. 

The grounds are ample, quiet is assured, and a new building for men 
makes easy the separation of the sexes. A number of cottages make possible 
satisfactory and congenial grouping. 

Rooms, single or en suite, with or without private baths. 

Hot water heat, electric lights, artesian water. 

Bowling, tennis, croquet, billiards, and a gymnasium afford recreation. 

Electrical and hydrotheraphy equipment. 

Nurses and attendants trained for this special work. 

Two of the physicians reside in the institution and devote their entire 
time to the patients. 



RICHMOND, 



VIRGINIA 



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Minor Operating Pocket Case 

AS SELECTED AND ARRANGED BY 

Dr. Geo. Ben Johnston 

CASE CONTAINS : 

One Scalpel; one Hernia Knife; one straight Sharp-Pointed Bistoury, or Finger 
Knife; one Curved Sharp-Pointed Bistoury; one Curved Probe-Pointed Bistoury; one 
Tenaculum; one Matthieu's Needle Holder; one Pair s-inch Straight Scissors, with 
Asceptic Locks; one Pair Dressing Forceps; three Pairs Halstead's Special Fine- Point 
HEemostatic Forceps, with Aseptic Locks; one Ear Spoon and Eye Spud; Silver-Plated 
Male and Female Catheter combined; one Director and Aneurism Needle; two Silver 
Probes; one-half dozen Needles, assorted; two Sterilizable Tablets of Silk, white and 
black. In neat and compact Seal Grained Leather Case. 



Price Tivelve Dollars Net 




POWERS & ANDERSON 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS and HOSPITAL SUPPLIES 



603 East Main Street 



Richmond, Virginia 




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FAUGHT POCKET 



BLOOD 

PRESSURE 
APPARATUS 

For Sale by all Surgical Dealers 

Built like a watch on the Aneroid principle, not a 
Spring Instrument. Can be carried in the pocket. 
Simple, accurate and easy to use. Always reliable. 
Adjusted in a moment. Just like taking a pulse. 

Price, complete, with arm band and in- 
flating pump, in durable morocco case. .$22.50 net 



NOT A 
SPRING INSTRUMENT 





ACTUAL SIZE 



ALSO 



Faught Standard Mercury $20.00 net 

Pilling Special Xo. i Mercury 15.00 net 

Pilling Special No. 2 Mercury 12.00 net 

Faught's Primer on Blood Pressure. . 25 cts 

SIGNED CERTIFICATE BY DR. FAUGHT 
WITH EVERY INSTRUMENT 

Faught's Primer on Blood Pressure Free 
With Every Apparatus 

Made only by 

G. P. PILLING & SON CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

For Sale by 

POWERS & ANDERSON, Richmond, Va. 








The Secret Behind 

FLOWERS 

OF GUARANTEED 
FRESHNESS 

Each day we cut flowers from under a vast expanse of 
240,000 feet of glass. These are the choice blooms which are 
used in making up your orders. Artistic Corsages, etc., packed 
by Hammond are guaranteed to arrive in perfect condition. 

Corsages--Cut Flowers— Decorations 
WE DELIVER ANYWHERE 

When flowers are to be sent, the best are none too good. 
The assurance that your flowers' wiU prove unusually lasting 
is worth much to you. Yet this quality is yours without extra 
charge. Hammond flowers are always moderately priced. 

ASK FOR ESTIMATES 

HAMMOND 

"'The South' s Largest Florist'' 

Telephone Madison 630 

log E, Broad Street, Richmond, Va. 



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Murphy's Hotel 



Richmond, Va. 




This new fireproof Hotel is now open to the pub- 
lic, giving Richmond the Largest and most Modern 
Hotel in the South 

Murphy's Hotel is famous for its location, being 
on direct car lines to all Railroad Depots 

European Plan $i.oo up 

Railroad Ticket Office in Lobby and Baggage 
checked to destination, also Postal and Telegraph Of- 
fices, and every service unsurpassed 



JAMES T. DISNEY, MANAGER 



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PKone Monroe 3877 




802 East Main Street ~ 



The Baer Tailoring Co, 

"We Fit 'Em All" 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 




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ExclusiA)e Custom Tailors to Young 
Men and Men who ^^ant to look 
3)oung. 

SUITS $18.00 to $40.00 

TROUSERS . . $5.ooto$ia.oo 

10 Per Cent. Discount to Students 




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We Are Alwa3)s First With the Latest" 




Staff of Eight Physicians and Specialists in Internal 
Medicine, Neurology, Gynecology, Surgery and Obstetrics 

RECENTLY ENLARGED FOR FIFTH TIME, AND REORGANIZED ON LATEST 
APPROVED SCIENTIFIC LINES 



HOSPITAL 
METHODS 



ACUTE 
CASES 



SANATORIUM CHRONIC 

for 
FACILITIES CASES 



THE EQUIPMENT FOR DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT IS UNUSUALLY EXTENSIVE 
AND COMPLETE, AND INCLUDES 

Enlarged Special Pathological Laboratories; Modern Operating and Treatment Rooms; 
Most improved Snook- Rcentgen X-Ray and Vertical Fluoroscopic Apparatus; 
Complete equipment and trained attendants in the Departments of Hydrotherapy, Electro- 
therapy, Massage, and otlier therapeutic and diagnostic specialties. 

The Staff is composed of Specialists in each Department who direct the treatment of each patient. 
The Training School for Nurses provides regular and special courses. 
Two Resident Physicians- are in constant attendance in the building. 
Rates are the same as in the other hospitals in the City. 

NO DRUG NOR INSANE CASES RECEIVED OPEN THE ENTIRE YEAR 



Established 1872 



Excelled by None 




E. A. WRIGHT 

1 108 Chestnut Street Philadelphia 

Cngratier=#rinter===^tationcr 

Manufacturer of 

CLASS AND SOCIETY PINS, MEDALS 

Exclusive Designs in 
Stationery Calling Cards 

{Fraternity and Class) Invitations 

Dance Programs Shingles 

Menus Certificates 

Leather Souvenirs 

ENGROSSING CERTIFICATES MEMOIRS TESTIMONIALS 




J. i 1 1 1 1 1 1 mUjlUiaUlLULLLIXLUllil I 



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The Neurological Sanatorium, Inc. 



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PRIVATE SANATORIUM 

OF 
Dr. Beverly R. Tucker 

Dr. Meade C. Edmunds, 
Associate 

A private institution for the 
treatment of Nervous Diseases. 
Equipped for Hydrotherapy, 
Medical Electricity, the Rest 
Treatment, Exercises and Mas- 
sage. Nurses trained in the care 
of nervous patients 



I02 and 104 East Grace Street 



Richmond, Va. 



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Doctors I 



Make Your Headquarters M^ith Us 



GRANT DRUG CO 



TWO STORES 



Main and 12th Streets 



Broad and 7th Streets 



BROAD STREET STORE 
OPEN ALL NIGHT 





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The JEFFERSON 

Richmond, Virginia 
European Plan 

Ideally situated in the most desirable section of Rich- 
mond, and within tive minutes' walk of the business center 
and shopping district. 

400 Rooms — 300 Baths 

Every comfort for the tourist. Every convenience for 
the traveling man. Rooms single and en suite. Turkish 
and Roman Baths. Spacious sample rooms. 



Rates 



$1-50 



Per Day and 

Upwards 



O. F. WEISIGER, MANAGER 






All PhotograpKic Work in TKis Book 



BY 



W. W. FOSTER 

High Class PhotograpKer 
112 NORTH NINTH ST. 

RicKmond, Virginia 




E. T. ^^'EYMOUTH 



O. A. Meister 



Wey month, Miester ^Smithie 

BOOKBINDERS 

MEDICAL AND LAW BOOKS 

MAGAZINES 

EDITION BINDING 

Paper Rulers :: Blank Book Manufacturers :: Badge Stampers 

Good Work, Fair Prices Give Us a Trial 

Phone Madison 3414 

105-107 Governor Street RICHMOND, VA. 



GLYCO-THYMOLINE 

(Trade Mark) 

THE 

ALKALINE 

ANTISEPTIC 

Indicated in the treatment of congestion and inflam- 
mation of mucous membrane in all parts of the body. 

Relieves congestion by exomosis. Stimulates the local capillary circu- 
lation to renewed activity, thus restoring normality. 

SAMPLES ON REQUEST 

KRESS ef OWEN COMPANY 

361-363 Pearl Street 





New York Life Insurance Compan)) 

The New York Life Insurance Company solicits your patronage. It has an honor- 
able record of sixty-nine years. 

Its policies protect nearly one million families. 

It has over 748 million dollars in assets. Its legal reserves amount to $642,598,782.00. 
' Surplus, $105,898,958.00. 

It will pay in dividends in 1914 over 17 million dollars. 

It is purely mutual. It has no capital stock. All of its assets, surplus and earnings 
belong to its policy-holders. 

Its poHcies are free of restrictions as to travel, residence and occupation, contain 
liberal guarantees, and the Company's record for the prompt settlement of claims is 
second to no other company. 

It has $18,615,000 insurance in force in Virginia. 

It has $11,589,000 invested in Virginia. 

It paid over $566,000 to Virginia policy-holders in 1913, including $113,000 in 

dividends. 

HEAD OFFICE SOUTHERN DEPARTMENT, 

MUTU.A.L Building, Richmond, Va. 
Thad. C. Bell, 
Inspector of Agencies. 
W. B. Freeman & Son, General Agents, 
M. T. Abel, Agency Organiser, 
C. H. Woodward, Cashier, 

Richmond Branch. 



WE ARE INDEBTED TO 

R. LOVENSTEIKf & SONS 

FOR THEIR 
KINDNESS AND COURTESIES 




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Hycosangaul 
Globules 



Jt Hy-oscyamus Ext Gr ss 

Co-pabia Balsam (Pure) Gtt v 

San-tal Oil (East India) Gtt v 

Gaul-theria Oil (True) Gtt iii 

(M. F. T. Cap. No. i) 

Advertised Only to Physicians 

Supplied by All Druggists 

Guaranteed under the Pure Food and 
Drugs /^ct, June 30, 1906, Serial No. 
52207. 

CHAS. S. TURNER 

REGISTERED PHARMACIST 
RICHMOND, VA. 



S. G. & S, Co, 
with Uritropin 

Advertised to Physicians Only 

Uritropin (About) Gr. i 

Santal Oil (Opt) Gtt. iiii 

Salol (Usi) Gr. ii 

Gaultheria Oil (True) Gtt. ii 

M. F. T. Soft Elastic Capsule No. i 



The Bodeker Drug 
Company 

IMPORTERS 
.". .". and .". .'. 
WHOLESALE 
DRUGGISTS 

1414-1416 E. Main St. 

Richmond, Virginia 

BROKEN 
LENSES 

Duplicated Promptly and 
• A ccurately 



Oculists' prescriptions filled, and every 
kind of Optical work skilfully attended 
to. Special discount to students. 





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The S. Galeski 
Optical Co. 

LEADING AND LARGEST 
OPTICAL HOUSE SOUTH 




High Class Prescription 
Work a Specialty 

Kodakerv in All Its Branches 



W. G. BURNETTE 



F. V. Berry 



Richmond 
Pharmacy 

DRUGGISTS 
Both Homoepathic and Allopathic 

Agents for 

Allegrette Chocolates 
Raven Brand Olive Oil 




Mad. 293 



Mad. 9622 



Tarrant Drug 
Company 

PHONE US 
For the Prompt Delivery of 

Prescriptions, Drugs 
and Chemicals 



A 7ititoxins and all Vaccifies 

Antitoxin Vaccines and Milk Ferment 
Preparations Kept on Ice 



Broadway 

National 

Bank 

First and Broad Streets 



Accounts of Medical 

Students Will Be 

Welcomed 

Til 





DPDDnn 



Sal Cassatta 

Richmond's Leading Barber 



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Lady Manicurist in Attendance 



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909 E. Broad Street 



We wish to thank all Adver- 
tisers for their generous support, 
and urge the student-body to pat- 
ronize the firms who have contrib- 
uted to the success of this issue of 

" rhe X-Ray" 



9 



Watch this space next year 



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